6 Best Weightlifting Shoes For Women in 2023

Nicholas Rizzo
Nicholas Rizzo on
6 Best Weightlifting Shoes For Women in 2023

Though weightlifting is incorporated in a lot of workout programs such as CrossFit and HIIT, it is still a discpline that stands on its own. It has unique demands such as maintaining an upright posture and a deeply and securely rooted stance. A good weightlifting shoe for the ladies is going to be helpful in meeting these demands.

Even if it is already a specialized discipline, the number of weightlifting shoes available for women can still be overwhelming. Hence, we made a list of the most worthwhile ones, and made it available to you here. Reebok and Adidas are among the brands that dominate this list. 

How we test weightlifting shoes

Ranking shoes is an exercise in futility if we cannot maintain our objectivity and credibility. Hence, we make sure of the following:

  • We appreciate freebies but we don't just accept them especially if it's a shoe that we are going to review.
  • We write reviews only AFTER we've used the shoe in actual weightlifting sessions for at least two weeks.
  • We have our own opinions, as we check others' (reviewers from outside RunRepeat) as well before we finalize our review. 

In addition to our qualitative assessments, we also calculate the Corescore of each women's weightlifting shoe. This figure is technically the weighted average of all the individual ratings from experts, avid weightlifters, and hobbyists from all over the web.

Best women's weightlifting shoes overall

Xero Shoes 360
Xero Shoes 360

CoreScore

93
Superb!
4.9 / 5 from 1,091 users
95 / 100 from 2 experts

Pros

  • Amazing trainer overall
  • Functional versatility
  • Dependable grip
  • Allowance for toe splays
  • Flat and highly stable for lifting
  • Incredibly light
  • Super comfortable
  • Fairly durable

Cons

  • Not for narrow feet
  • Has to be broken in

Verdict

The Xero Shoes 360 is not to be discounted when it comes to minimalist barefoot-feel shoes. This trainer just provides all that's important to a typical gymgoer. What's even more amazing is that it is not limiting at all! It can be used in a wide range of sports and even mundane activities. Getting this trainer is like paying for only one but enjoying the performance of many.
Xero Shoes 360 full review

Best Nike weightlifting shoes for women

Nike Savaleos
Nike Savaleos

CoreScore

83
Great!
4.0 / 5 from 182 users
87 / 100 from 13 experts

Pros

  • Versatile for a lifting shoe
  • Superb stability
  • Reasonably priced
  • Secure lockdown
  • Velcro doesn’t damage laces
  • Excellent grip
  • Visually appealing
  • Great for beginners

Cons

  • Not for heavy weightlifting
  • Not for wide feet

Verdict

It's clear that the Savaleos from Nike is designed to adequately perform in both lifting and working out. If you're looking for footwear that can switch between these two endeavors, this shoe could be the answer. In a nutshell, the Nike Savaleos is a versatile, entry-level lifting shoe that could double as a workout buddy.
Nike Savaleos full review

Best Reebok weightlifting shoes for women

Reebok Lifter PR II
Reebok Lifter PR II

CoreScore

92
Superb!
4.6 / 5 from 1,334 users
90 / 100 from 5 experts

Pros

  • Comfortable
  • Great value for money
  • Supportive during workouts
  • Stable platform
  • Impressive construction
  • Appealing design

Cons

  • Flimsy strap

Verdict

If you want an excellent entry-level lifting shoe, then the Reebok Lifter PR II is the one to check out. It is an updated iteration of Reebok's original PR weightlifting shoe that highlights stability on the platform. Most recommended for newbies who need more assistance for ankle mobility while lifting and squatting.
Reebok Lifter PR II full review

Best Adidas weightlifting shoes for women

Adidas The Total
Adidas The Total

CoreScore

90
Superb!
4.7 / 5 from 526 users
93 / 100 from 2 experts

Pros

  • Great for strength training
  • Good traction
  • Quite stable ride
  • A lot of ground feel
  • Lightweight and comfortable
  • Functionally spacious toebox
  • Accommodates wide feet
  • Fairly priced
  • Streamlined look

Cons

  • Has to be broken in
  • Not versatile enough for non-strength exercises

Verdict

Hands down, the Adidas The Total is a well-built shoe that does what it's intended to do: make lifting safer and more efficient. Reviewers can't find any serious flaws in it, so it's safe to say that you will get your money's worth, and perhaps even more, when you buy this.
Adidas The Total full review

Best weightlifting medium toebox training shoes for women

Inov-8 Fastlift 360
Inov-8 Fastlift 360

CoreScore

84
Great!
4.5 / 5 from 1,307 users
N/A

Pros

  • Excellent stability
  • Reliable outsole grip
  • Durable
  • Great breathability
  • Appealing design

Cons

  • Too tight
  • Stiff

Verdict

For many weightlifters, the stability the Inov-8 FastLift 360 delivers is worthy of their commendations. Its dependable traction on gym surfaces and durability didn't go unnoticed too. On the flip side, some were not happy with how tight the shoe fits. Overall, athletes who are serious about weight training will surely enjoy the benefits this trainer brings.
Inov-8 Fastlift 360 full review

Best value weightlifting shoes for women

Adidas Adipower 3
Adidas Adipower 3

CoreScore

87
Great!
4.5 / 5 from 951 users
87 / 100 from 4 experts

Pros

  • A good overall performer
  • Accommodating toe box
  • Feels durable
  • Fairly breathable upper
  • Nice stability
  • Nice heel height
  • Dependable grip
  • Attractively streamlined look

Cons

  • Too expensive
  • Not for wide-footers

Verdict

With all the right boxes ticked, the Adidas Adipower 3 is a dependable partner for casual to heavy weightlifting. It brings back fond memories of the original Adipower, which was a very well-received shoe, and still offers some more. Beginners and more experienced lifters alike are going to enjoy training in this model.
Adidas Adipower 3 full review
Author
Nicholas Rizzo
Nicholas Rizzo

Nick combines 10+ years of experience in the health and fitness industry and a background in the sciences in his role as the Fitness Research Director. During his competitive powerlifting years his PRs have him sitting in the top 2% of bench presses (395 lbs), top 3% of squats (485 lbs) and top 6% of deadlifts (515 lbs) for his weight and age. His work has been featured on Bodybuilding.com, LiveStrong, Healthline, WebMD, WashingtonPost, and many more. Along the way, collaborating with industry leaders like Michael Yessis, Mark Rippetoe, Carlo Buzzichelli, Dave Tate, Ray Williams, and Joel Seedman.