Verdict from 5.7 hours of research from the internet

10 reasons to buy

  • Several skaters say that the New Balance Numeric 379 is a cleanly deconstructed silhouette.
  • It’s budget-friendly but has quite more high-tech features and premium materials than most skate shoes within its price range, according to an expert.
  • Various testers say it’s comfortable and flexible right out of the box, like it was already broken in.
  • The dual-density gum outsole delivers a good package of arch support, shock absorption, grip, and board feel, a few reviewers have remarked.
  • A technical skater digs its rounded toe shape, which makes the flips feel more “predictive.”
  • Its rubberized heel cup is supportive and nicely locks in the heel, which a couple of users like.
  • The little perforations in the tongue add bits of breathability, a user points out.
  • Some customers are so pleased with their NM379 purchase that they consider getting another pair soon.
  • Quite a few shoppers also mention that the NM379’s smooth, cool colorways look nice for the spring season.
  • The Numeric 379 from New Balance runs true to size, per most reviews.

3 reasons not to buy

  • A few narrow-footed users express that the NM379 fits a bit wide.
  • The heel counter feels almost too soft, according to a reviewer.
  • A skater points out that insole feels pretty stiff underfoot.

Bottom line

The New Balance Numeric oeuvre gets deeper with the Numeric 379, a handsome update to the popular 345 model. The NM379 strikes with a minimalist low profile. It features an unseamed, one-piece toe for an even wear-and-tear, and a lower ankle cut with canvas perimeter piping for extended mobility.

Rather evolved than paired down, the NM379 retains what is essential, sheds off what is not. It settles atop a supportive ABZORB+ midsole. Underneath, an NDurance outsole with a herringbone tread promises a grip that lasts. The NM379 sits friendly at $80.

User reviews:

This NB model has a low-profile, which lets the ankles exercise full mobility. It also uses a traditional lace-up closure, along with an elastic gusseted tongue. The two work together to give the feet a slip-on feel with a customizable fit.

Lastly, these NM379 vulc shoes are available in men’s sizing, which ranges from 6 to 13 and set in standard (D) width.

In and out the skate park, the NM379 looks splendid with its polished silhouette decked in muted colors, befitting the New Balance’s simple, quiet personality. That said, casual and laid-back clothing goes perfect with this kind of kick. It looks at home with staples such as denims, pants, khakis, chinos, pants, tees, flannel, hoodie, etc.

Moreover, NM379 colorways include sea salt with grey, black with grey, yellow with white, green with white, brown with gum, wheat with sea salt, and olive with yellow.

The NM379’s bare design is misleading. This sneaker is not a simple as it looks. Hidden from sight are a few components that make this model stand out and endure harsh skating. It has an elastic band under a laser-perforated tongue and internally reinforced toe area. Also inside is a PU (polyurethane) insole that absorbs impact and doesn’t pack out throughout the shoe’s lifespan.   

In 2013, the century-old New Balance launched their skate-focused Numeric range, the brand’s entry into the skate industry. While taking inspiration from their classic running models, New Balance treated the skate shoes with the same level of craftiness as they did their athletic footwear. That resulted in the New Balance becoming a powerhouse in producing performance skate shoes.

New Balance stuck to their hundred-year-old minimalist roots, always stripping the sneakers down to the essentials, which became the brand’s unmistakable trademark. That much is seen in the Numeric range, especially in one of its newest additions, the Numeric 379, which looks ready to shred in the streets and parks.     

  • The lace-up closure is comprised of a flat lace running through six metal eyelets, for a stylish, durable construction. 
Author
Danny McLoughlin
Danny McLoughlin

Danny McLoughlin is a researcher for RunRepeat covering football, sneakers and running. After graduating with a degree in computer science from The University of Strathclyde, Danny makes sure never to miss a game of his beloved Glasgow Rangers or the Scotland national football team. He has been featured in prestigious publications such as The Washington Post, The Irish Times, Footwear News and the like.

daniel@runrepeat.com