Our verdict

Altra's Lone Peak Hiker 2 is a hiking boot that rides more like a trail shoe on steroids. Its cushy midsole makes each mile marker on our test hikes feel as comfy as the last while being responsive enough to support a light jog. We also appreciate the boot's roomy and generously padded upper which gently pampers our feet as we trudge along. While it may not be the strongest on technical terrains, its barely-there build and good looks make the Lone Peak Hiker 2 an excellent city-to-trail boot.

Pros

  • Exceptionally comfortable
  • Astonishingly lightweight
  • Gives strides a boost
  • Performs consistently in cold conditions
  • Superb durability
  • Supportive around the ankle
  • Excellent attention to detail
  • Decent moisture resistance
  • Dries quickly

Cons

  • Subpar grip on technical terrain
  • Underwhelming stability
  • Quite hard to put on and off

Audience verdict

73
Bad!

Who should buy

We recommend the Altra Lone Peak Hiker 2 as an excellent hiking companion for:

  • Hikers in the market for an incredibly comfy zero-drop hiking boot for less challenging terrains
  • Speedy hikers looking for a nimble and lightweight boot that feels more like a trail runner underfoot
  • Year-round adventurers who need a boot that performs consistently from blustering summer treks to frigid winter hauls. 
  • Casual hikers looking for a boot that's good for long hauls as well as quick strolls through the park or around town
  • Those with broad feet prone to hotspots and blisters in need of a snug but accommodating toebox 

Altra Lone Peak Hiker 2 gkghk

Who should NOT buy

While the Lone Peak Hiker 2 provides excellent traction on dirt trails, we felt decidedly less surefooted on gravelly or rocky trails. For advanced hikers who frequently traverse more technical trails, we recommend the more aggressive La Sportiva Ultra Raptor II Mid GTX instead. 

The Lone Peak Hiker 2 is weatherproof, but not waterproof. So while the boot will keep our feet relatively dry during rainfall, it won't help much when wading through riverbeds or streams. For those who need to keep their feet dry, especially in the colder months, we recommend the Hoka Trail Code GTX instead. 

The flexibility of the Lone Peak Hiker 2 certainly contributes to its comfy, trail-shoe vibe, but also detracts from its stability. Especially as the mile markers wear on and foot fatigue sets in. Backpackers looking to schlep heavy loads across vast distances will be better served by a more stable boot like the much heavier but supportive Salomon Quest 4 GTX.

Altra Lone Peak Hiker 2 cu

The instability of the Lone Peak Hiker 2 will feel even more pronounced for those with narrow feet who will have to put in more effort to stabilize their landings as their feet swim around in the toebox. For a more snug alternative, we recommend looking into the also lightweight Hoka Anacapa Mid GTX instead. 

Breathability

To see how breathable the Lone Peak Hiker 2 is, we pumped it full of smoke and observed how easily it was able to vent from the boot. As we can see from the footage, the smoke was only able to escape through the Lone Peak Hiker 2's porous, semi-gusseted tongue while the rest of the upper remains relatively airtight. This leads us to give the Lone Peak Hiker 2 a breathability score of 2 out of 5. This means that the boot will certainly feel stuffy during hikes on sweltering summer days but still has some level of airflow to keep it from becoming a stinky foot sauna. 

The Merrel Moab 3, on the other hand, lets the smoke dissipate rather evenly throughout the shoe, making it much more suited for hikes on hot, dry days. 

Inspecting a cross-section of the mostly mesh upper, we see that it entirely blocks out the backlight, thus confirming the insular, weatherproof nature of the shoe. Just as light isn't able to peak through any pores of the upper, water is similarly repelled unless the boot gets drenched. 

To see how the mech is able to repel water so efficiently, we took a look at it under the microscope which reveals an incredibly uniform and dense weave pattern with almost no gaps between the braids.  

Altra Lone Peak Hiker 2 Breathability

Altra Lone Peak Hiker 2 kekj
Test results
Lone Peak Hiker 2 2
Average 1.7
Compared to 21 hiking boots
Number of shoes
1
Breathability
5

Durability

Toebox durability

To simulate extreme wear and tear, we subjected the Lone Peak Hiker 2 to a series of Dremel tests, starting with the toebox. Spinning at 5K RPM, we set the tool's abrasive element to an unreinforced section of mesh with 3.2N of force.

While we were able to pierce through the mesh by the end of the twelve-second test, the hole left doesn't span the entire point of contact and the overall integrity of the toebox wasn't greatly affected, so we give the Lone Peak Hiker 2 a middle-of-the-road toebox durability score of 3 out of 5. 

Altra Lone Peak Hiker 2 Toebox durability
Test results
Lone Peak Hiker 2 3
Average 4.4
Compared to 17 hiking boots
Number of shoes
1
Toebox durability
5

Heel padding durability

The heel counter proved to be an even better adversary to our Dremel which merely skated off the lining material and left the padding beneath intact. 

This stellar performance leads us to give the Lone Peak Hiker 2 a perfect 5 out of 5 for heel padding durability. 

Altra Lone Peak Hiker 2 Heel padding durability
Test results
Lone Peak Hiker 2 5
Average 3.8
Compared to 17 hiking boots
Number of shoes
1
Heel padding durability
5

Outsole hardness

The MaxTrac rubber compound that makes up the outsole gave us a durometer reading of 85.5 HC which is right around our current lab average. This usually denotes a good mix of grip and durability, the latter of which will be tested in the next section. 

Altra Lone Peak Hiker 2 Outsole hardness
Test results
Lone Peak Hiker 2 85.5 HC
Average 87.3 HC
We use an average of four tests. The photo shows one of those tests.
Compared to 21 hiking boots
Number of shoes
81.0 HC
Outsole hardness
92.0 HC

Outsole durability

This time spinning at 10K RPM, we set the Dremel against one of the lugs which immediately kicked up a flurry of rubber particles. Not a promising sign. 

After twenty-two seconds of grinding, we measured the indentation left behind with a tire tread gauge and found that 1.2 mm of material was lost to the test. This makes the Lone Peak Hiker 2's outsole less durable than the average hiking boot which loses less under similar circumstances. This further confirms that this boot isn't well-suited for harsh, gravelly trails which will erode the lugs at a much faster rate than softer dirt trails. The Adidas Terrex Free Hiker 2 sports a much more durable outsole with a similarly light trail shoe-esque frame. 

Altra Lone Peak Hiker 2 Outsole durability
Test results
Lone Peak Hiker 2 1.2 mm
Average 0.7 mm
Compared to 14 hiking boots
Number of shoes
0.0 mm
Outsole wear
2.0 mm

Outsole thickness

The Lone Peak Hiker 2's outsole boasts less rubber than average at only 2.1 mm thick according to our caliper measurements. While this doesn't do the boot any favors in terms of durability, it does contribute to its lightweight frame. 

Test results
Lone Peak Hiker 2 2.1 mm
Average 3.1 mm
Compared to 21 hiking boots
Number of shoes
1.8 mm
Outsole thickness
5.6 mm

Weight

The Lone Peak Hiker 2 is a lean, mean, trail-crushing machine that tips our scale at only 12 oz (339g). 

Altra Lone Peak Hiker 2 Weight

As such, the Lone Peak Hiker 2 feels incredibly feathery underfoot which not only makes it great for long hikes with lots of ascents and descents, but also unburdensome enough to support light jogs for whenever the need for speed kicks in. 

Altra Lone Peak Hiker 2 Weight
Test results
Lone Peak Hiker 2 11.96 oz (339g)
Average 17.92 oz (508g)
Compared to 21 hiking boots
Number of shoes
11.71 oz (332g)
Weight
26.00 oz (737g)

Cushioning

Heel stack

We measured the Lone Peak Hiker 2's stack to be 26.4 mm thick at the heel.

Altra Lone Peak Hiker 2 Heel stack

This is significantly shorter than average but still has plenty of foam underfoot for us to enjoy well-cushioned landings over the course of testing this boot. 

Test results
Lone Peak Hiker 2 26.4 mm
Average 35.9 mm
Compared to 21 hiking boots
Number of shoes
26.2 mm
Heel stack
46.9 mm

Forefoot stack

Naturally, we expect the forefoot stack to match the heel but there's a bit of a discrepancy with the Lone Peak Hiker 2. Using the measuring guidelines set by World Athletics, we measured the Lone Peak Hiker 2's forefoot stack to actually be 23.8 mm thick. So, technically, it's not a true zero-drop boot. 

Altra Lone Peak Hiker 2 Forefoot stack

This amount of foam underfoot is on par with our current lab average and is enough to effectively mute out the harsh terrain below. 

Test results
Lone Peak Hiker 2 23.8 mm
Average 22.5 mm
Compared to 21 hiking boots
Number of shoes
17.0 mm
Forefoot stack
30.7 mm

Drop

The difference in our stack measurements means that the Lone Peak Hiker 2 actually sports a 2.6 mm heel drop. This is still a more parallel-to-the-ground experience than most hiking boots offer and will only be noticeable to true zero-drop purists. 

Altra Lone Peak Hiker 2 Drop
Test results
Lone Peak Hiker 2 2.6 mm
Average 13.4 mm
Compared to 21 hiking boots
Number of shoes
2.6 mm
Drop
20.9 mm

Midsole softness

Note: a low durometer measurement equals a soft material, whereas a high measurement means it's firm.

Pressing our durometer against the midsole yields a reading of 22 HA. This level of softness provides a balanced level of cushioning 

Altra Lone Peak Hiker 2 hjev

Apart from providing good impact dampening, the midsole is also quite responsive. It has a springy rebound that feels more like a trail running shoe that gives us a little extra pep in our step while hiking in this boot. What's more, it means that we could break out into a jog at a moment's notice and comfortably scamper along the trails like a breeze. 

Test results
Lone Peak Hiker 2 22.0 HA
Average 25.4 HA
We use an average of four tests. The photo shows one of those tests.
Compared to 21 hiking boots
Number of shoes
15.4 HA
Midsole softness (soft to firm)
53.3 HA

Midsole softness in cold

Note: a low durometer measurement equals a soft material, whereas a high measurement means it's firm.
Altra Lone Peak Hiker 2 Midsole softness in cold

Difference in midsole softness in cold

We placed the Lone Peak Hiker 2 in our freezer for twenty minutes to see the effects of cold conditions on the midsole. Once appropriately chilled, we pressed our durometer against it once more and got a much softer-than-average reading of 25.3 HA. This 14.8% increase in firmness means that the Lone Peak Hiker 2 performs very consistently no matter how frosty it gets and will provide balanced cushioning all year round. 

Test results
Lone Peak Hiker 2 14.8%
Average 21.5%
Compared to 21 hiking boots
Number of shoes
0%
Difference in midsole softness in cold
100%

Insole thickness

We measured the insole to be 7.4 mm thick which is quite a bit thicker than our current lab average. This provided us with great arch support and a cushy footbed to sink into that really elevated our levels of comfort while testing this boot. 

Altra Lone Peak Hiker 2 Insole thickness
Test results
Lone Peak Hiker 2 7.4 mm
Average 6.0 mm
Compared to 21 hiking boots
Number of shoes
3.7 mm
Insole thickness
10.7 mm

Stability

Lateral stability test

The Lone Peak Hiker 2, for all its comfort, isn't a very stable shoe as demonstrated by how much lateral movement it allows as we shift our weight from side to side. This made traversing uneven terrains a little more challenging as we had to be more mindful of our steps and make lots of foot adjustments for balance. While this is fine when it comes to day hikes, we would recommend a more stable shoe like the Keen Pyrenees for long-haul backpacking adventures that involve carrying heavy loads. 

Torsional rigidity

The Lone Peak Hiker 2 put up a fair amount of resistance as we bent and twisted the shoe in our hands during our manual assessment, leading us to give it a somewhat stiff torsional rigidity score of 4 out of 5. This allows the boot to maintain a relatively level base underfoot that promotes stable landings while hiking along. 

Test results
Lone Peak Hiker 2 4
Average 4.2
Compared to 21 hiking boots
Number of shoes
1
Torsional rigidity
5

Heel counter stiffness

The Lone Peak Hiker 2's heel counter is somewhat flexible and earns a middle-of-the-road stiffness score of 3 out of 5. So while it does provide a secure lockdown that comfortably holds our heel in place, it doesn't do much to mitigate the rearfoot from rolling laterally. 

Test results
Lone Peak Hiker 2 3
Average 3.4
Compared to 21 hiking boots
Number of shoes
1
Heel counter stiffness
5

Midsole width in the forefoot

The Lone Peak Hiker 2's midsole is about as wide as our current lab average at 110 mm according to our caliper measurements. This gives us a good amount of platform for relatively stable landings. 

Altra Lone Peak Hiker 2 Midsole width in the forefoot
Test results
Lone Peak Hiker 2 110.0 mm
Average 112.2 mm
Compared to 21 hiking boots
Number of shoes
96.3 mm
Midsole width in the forefoot
124.6 mm

Midsole width in the heel

Back at the heel, we found the Lone Peak Hiker 2's midsole to be narrower than average at only 84.4 mm wide. This didn't really present us with any issues while testing, but those more accustomed to a wider base at the heel should look into the Timberland Sprint Trekker instead. 

Altra Lone Peak Hiker 2 Midsole width in the heel
Test results
Lone Peak Hiker 2 84.4 mm
Average 88.3 mm
Compared to 21 hiking boots
Number of shoes
71.7 mm
Midsole width in the heel
106.1 mm

Flexibility

Stiffness

We secured the Lone Peak Hiker 2 to our workbench and found that 29.9N of force is needed to bend it 90 degrees, making it more flexible than the average hiking boot. 

The flexibility of the Lone Peak Hiker 2 is thanks in part to the configuration of its lugs which are designed to line up with the bones of our foot, allowing the shoe to bend along with the natural flexion of our foot with relative ease. 

Altra Lone Peak Hiker 2 hjvhjkvkuv

This certainly plays a role in how comfy and forgiving the Lone Peak Hiker 2 feels underfoot, however it does come at the expense of stability, especially when carrying a heavy pack.

Altra Lone Peak Hiker 2 Stiffness
Test results
Lone Peak Hiker 2 29.9N
Average 40.2N
We use an average of four tests. The video shows one of those tests.
Compared to 21 hiking boots
Number of shoes
16.6N
Stiffness
84.7N

Difference in stiffness in cold

We also repeated the flex test after leaving the Lone Peak Hiker 2 in the freezer for twenty minutes and found that it only became 13.9% stiffer when exposed to the cold. In fact, with a post-freezer requirement of 34.1N to bend the boot to the desired point, the chilled Lone Peak Hiker 2 is more flexible than the average boot at room temperature. This incredibly consistent performance means that the boot should be just as pliable and forgiving on the foot during frigid winter hikes. That said, we still wouldn't recommend trudging through heavy snow or ice in this boot. 

Altra Lone Peak Hiker 2 Difference in stiffness in cold
Test results
Lone Peak Hiker 2 13.9%
Average 29%
Compared to 21 hiking boots
Number of shoes
0%
Difference in stiffness in cold
100%

Grip / Traction

Lug depth

The Lone Peak Hiker 2's lugs are 4 mm thick according to our caliper measurements, putting them on par with our current lab average. 

Altra Lone Peak Hiker 2 Lug depth

These multi-directional, chevron-shaped lugs provided us with excellent traction during our test hikes on dirt trails and well-manicured park trails. 

Altra Lone Peak Hiker 2 Lug depth

However, the boot did let us down when we tested it on more technical, gravelly trails where we felt decidedly less surefooted in our strides. We also recommend avoiding slick or muddy surfaces in this boot. 

Altra Lone Peak Hiker 2 Lug depth
Test results
Lone Peak Hiker 2 4.0 mm
Average 4.1 mm
Compared to 21 hiking boots
Number of shoes
3.0 mm
Lug depth
5.7 mm

Size and fit

Toebox width at the widest part

At 97.8 mm wide at its widest point according to our caliper measurements, the Lone Peak Hiker 2's toebox is narrower than our current lab average. This is out of the norm for Altra which has come to be known for their roomy and accommodating toeboxes. This will feel a little snug for those with broad feet, but should still be somewhat comfortable while providing a secure lockdown. 

Altra Lone Peak Hiker 2 Toebox width at the widest part
Test results
Lone Peak Hiker 2 97.8 mm
Average 102.1 mm
Compared to 21 hiking boots
Number of shoes
95.5 mm
Toebox width at the widest part
110.2 mm

Toebox width at the big toe

The Lone Peak Hiker 2 does still achieve that natural foot-shaped silhouette we've come to love from Altra footwear by barely tapering towards the toes. 

Altra Lone Peak Hiker 2 erer

Measuring 91.1 mm wide around the big toe, the Lone Peak Hiker 2 gives us plenty of room to splay out comfortably whether walking or jogging in this boot. Conversely, having so much internal real estate isn't ideal for those with narrow feet as they will likely shift around within the boot when traversing uneven terrains, which takes a toll on stability and can exacerbate foot fatigue. 

Altra Lone Peak Hiker 2 Toebox width at the big toe
Test results
Lone Peak Hiker 2 91.1 mm
Average 79.0 mm
Compared to 21 hiking boots
Number of shoes
67.6 mm
Toebox width at the big toe
91.1 mm

Tongue: gusset type

Unlike many other hiking boots we've tested so far, the Lone Peak Hiker 2's tongue is only semi-gusseted. While this might help in shaving off a few grams from the overall weight, it does mean that little bits of grit and debris did occasionally make their way into the boot during our test hikes. 

Altra Lone Peak Hiker 2 Tongue: gusset type
Test results
Lone Peak Hiker 2 Both sides (semi)

Comfort

Tongue padding

At 9 mm thick according to our caliper measurements, the Lone Peak Hiker 2's tongue is slightly less padded than our current lab average. It's still cushy enough to feel incredibly comfortable across the instep and effectively protects us from lace bite while testing this boot. 

Altra Lone Peak Hiker 2 Tongue padding
Test results
Lone Peak Hiker 2 9.0 mm
Average 11.2 mm
Compared to 21 hiking boots
Number of shoes
5.9 mm
Tongue padding
22.3 mm

Heel tab

There's a cord-like finger loop at the heel of the Lone Peak Hiker 2 to help pull the boot on.

Altra Lone Peak Hiker 2 Heel tab

However, despite this feature, we still found the boot difficult to squeeze into without loosening up the laces significantly. 

Altra Lone Peak Hiker 2 Heel tab
Test results
Lone Peak Hiker 2 Finger loop

Removable insole

The Lone Peak Hiker 2's insole isn't glued in so it can easily be replaced with a custom orthotic if necessary. 

Altra Lone Peak Hiker 2 Removable insole
Test results
Lone Peak Hiker 2 Yes

Misc

Reflective elements

The Lone Peak Hiker 2 doesn't feature any reflective elements, so we don't recommend walking along dimly lit roads at night without additional high-vis gear. 

Altra Lone Peak Hiker 2 Reflective elements
Test results
Lone Peak Hiker 2 No