Our verdict

We think the On Cloudeclipse is a commendable response from On to the fierce competition in the maximalist daily trainer segment. We were really impressed with its high-quality build, unique ride, and protective stack height. However, it does come up short in aspects like energy return and overall value. Indeed, with a price tag of £180, it might not be the go-to option for those open to any brand; but for loyal fans of On, especially those focusing on easy or long runs, it's a perfect addition to their rotation. In summary, we found it to be a great shoe that delivers in many areas, yet it still lacks that extra spark we've seen in some competitors.

Pros

  • Most cushioned On model to date
  • New CloudTec Phase technology enhances speed
  • Improved upper with better durability and breathability
  • Extremely long-lasting outsole and upper
  • Effective heel lock
  • Good stability considering its stack height
  • Comfortably smooth ride
  • Excellent lockdown for regular-width feet

Cons

  • Helion foam lacks energy return
  • Seems overpriced, like other On models
  • Actual drop significantly varies from the stated measurement

Audience verdict

91
Superb!

Who should buy

Following our series of tests in the lab, we've determined that the On Cloudeclipse is a good choice for:

  • On loyal fans in search of a max-cushion daily trainer capable of handling multiple paces.
  • Runners who favour firmer yet responsive midsoles and don't mind splurging on a £180 shoe.
  • Anyone looking for a high-stack, maximalist running shoe that combines premium-quality materials with an unique design and ride.

On Cloudeclipse

Who should NOT buy

If you're hunting for an ultra-plush, marshmallow-soft running experience, the Cloudeclipse isn't for you. It's pretty much the opposite. Instead, we suggest checking out softer, high-stack options like the ASICS Nimbus 25 or New Balance SC Trainer v2.

Also, the Cloudeclipse isn't top-notch in terms of energy return. The Helion foam performs well but doesn't quite match the best on the market. For a better boost and quicker propulsion, we recommend shoes like the ASICS Superblast or the Hoka Mach X, which are equipped with PEBA-based foams.

On Cloudeclipse

Breathability

On shoes have often faced complaints about breathability from our team, with each pair seeming to lack airflow for those scorching summer days. But that's history now.

The Cloudeclipse has hit an amazing balance in terms of breathability, earning a fantastic 4 out of 5 in our tests. While some might wish for a perfect 5, we think differently—this is an all-year shoe, so retaining some warmth in winter is crucial.

Shining a light through the shoe confirmed our findings from the smoke test—the toebox is the star of the shoe. It's equipped with dozens of large ventilation holes, providing a refreshing airflow to your feet, complemented by thinner sections in the tongue.

On Cloudeclipse microscope

Driven by curiosity, we zoomed in under the microscope to get a closer look at these holes. They are impressively large but lined with an inner fabric for added comfort.

On Cloudeclipse holes

It's rare to find a double-layer upper with such impressive breathability, and a major credit goes to that inner fabric. It's incredibly thin and doesn't hinder airflow in the slightest.

Test results
Cloudeclipse 4
Average 3.8
Compared to 234 running shoes
Number of shoes
1
Breathability
5

Durability

Toebox durability

Despite the fact that uppers with high breathability scores often perform poorly in durability tests, we had high expectations for the Cloudeclipse, especially considering its £180 price tag.

Fortunately, On came through with an exceptionally durable engineered mesh that withstood our Dremel test impressively.

After spinning at 5K RPM (3.2N of force), the tool couldn't create a full hole in the upper. The minor damage we observed earns a solid 3 out of 5 from us, surpassing the performance of most shoes on the market.

On Cloudeclipse Toebox durability
Test results
Cloudeclipse 3
Average 2.4
Compared to 168 running shoes
Number of shoes
1
Toebox durability
5

Heel padding durability

Yet, while the toebox impressed, the heel was a letdown.

Using the same force, duration, and RPM, the outcome was drastically worse. In fact, it was the lowest possible, scoring a disappointing 1 out of 5.

On Cloudeclipse Heel padding durability
Test results
Cloudeclipse 1
Average 3.2
Compared to 164 running shoes
Number of shoes
1
Heel padding durability
5

Outsole hardness

We used the Shore C durometer to measure the hardness of the outsole. We found that On really focused on durability, using an extremely hard rubber that registered at 87.4 HC.

On Cloudeclipse

The outsole consists of rubber, the X-shaped Speedboard plate, and some exposed foam that is smartly bevelled to resist quick wear.

However, the grip is still good on roads and buffed trails.

On Cloudeclipse Outsole hardness
Test results
Cloudeclipse 87.4 HC
Average 80.5 HC
We use an average of four tests. The photo shows one of those tests.
Compared to 285 running shoes
Number of shoes
52.1 HC
Outsole hardness
93.0 HC

Outsole durability

To see if the high outsole hardness does its job, we fired up the Dremel one last time, this time at 10K RPM with the same 3.2N of force.

After the test, we measured an impressively small indentation of only 0.5 mm, confirming the outsole's fantastic durability. We can confidently say this shoe is built to last!

On Cloudeclipse Outsole durability
Test results
Cloudeclipse 0.5 mm
Average 0.9 mm
Compared to 146 running shoes
Number of shoes
0.0 mm
Outsole wear
2.0 mm

Outsole thickness

The outsole thickness is a tad below the average at 2.9 mm, but that's no worry, considering the amazing results from our previous durability test.

On Cloudeclipse outsole

All looks great here, let's move forward!

On Cloudeclipse Outsole thickness
Test results
Cloudeclipse 2.9 mm
Average 3.2 mm
Compared to 304 running shoes
Number of shoes
0.0 mm
Outsole thickness
6.6 mm

Weight

Weighing just 9.6 oz (272g), On has done a good job keeping the Cloudeclipse below the 10-oz benchmark for a maximalist, high-stack shoe.

This lightness also makes the shoe suitable for faster sessions, like tempo runs or long workouts with marathon-pace blocks. However, if you're looking for something even lighter, On has the Cloudsurfer 7, which features the same CloudTec Phase technology but with a lower stack height.

On Cloudeclipse Weight
Test results
Cloudeclipse 9.59 oz (272g)
Average 9.38 oz (266g)
Compared to 305 running shoes
Number of shoes
5.26 oz (149g)
Weight
12.56 oz (356g)

Cushioning

Heel stack

We're certain that On aimed to place the Cloudeclipse in the "max stack" category, and they've succeeded. At 39.9 mm, it's just below the World Athletics race-day legal regulation, and it really feels high on every run.

This makes it a fantastic option for heel strikers who need plenty of cushion underfoot, as well as for those looking for a reliable, set-and-forget shoe for long runs. However, we can also confirm that due to the massive stack, it's not the best shoe for tackling corners.

On Cloudeclipse Heel stack
Test results
Cloudeclipse 39.9 mm
Average 33.7 mm
Compared to 304 running shoes
Number of shoes
7.6 mm
Heel stack
45.7 mm

Forefoot stack

The forefoot is also heavily stacked at 30.5 mm, so our previous comments about heel strikers also apply to midfoot and forefoot strikers.

Overall, it's exactly what you'd expect from a maximalist, cushioned shoe.

On Cloudeclipse Forefoot stack
Test results
Cloudeclipse 30.5 mm
Average 25.0 mm
Compared to 304 running shoes
Number of shoes
7.6 mm
Forefoot stack
36.9 mm

Drop

However, we noticed a significant discrepancy with the brand regarding the Drop. On claims a 6-mm offset, but our measurements, done multiple times following World Athletics regulations, consistently showed a 9.4-mm heel-to-toe drop.

What does this mean? With nearly a 10-mm drop, the shoe is more suited for rearfoot strikers or anyone looking to ease the strain on their calves and Achilles tendons, though it's still versatile enough for anyone to use.

Overall, the 8-to-10-mm range is a common sweet spot for brands aiming to appeal to a wide range of runners.

On Cloudeclipse Drop
Test results
Cloudeclipse 9.4 mm
Average 8.7 mm
Compared to 304 running shoes
Number of shoes
-0.8 mm
Drop
16.1 mm

Insole thickness

At 4.1 mm thick, the insole is pretty much average. It didn't give us any issues, and we found it to be comfortable.

On Cloudeclipse Insole thickness
Test results
Cloudeclipse 4.1 mm
Average 4.5 mm
Compared to 300 running shoes
Number of shoes
1.5 mm
Insole thickness
7.3 mm

Midsole softness

Note: a low durometer measurement equals a soft material, whereas a high measurement means it's firm.

So, what about the midsole? At £180, we're expecting something really great, and this is... kinda great.

On has utilised its all-new CloudTec Phase technology. Here, the signature clouds are more precisely angled to collapse in a sequential manner. This happens based on their shape and size, in the direction of travel, with varied sizing on the lateral and medial sides.

The angled design enhances forward motion, giving it an edge over other On shoes like the Cloudmonster. However, the foam used is still Helion, a mix of EVA and OBC, which we measured at a firm 27.3 HA.

What does this mean? Well, the Cloudeclipse it's not super soft, but it feels more plush than other On shoes due to this new geometry. But there's more to the midsole—it also features an updated X-shaped TPU Speedboard plate, aiding in stability and propulsion.

In summary, it feels softer and bouncier compared to other On shoes, but it's still on the firmer side.

On Cloudeclipse Midsole softness
Test results
Cloudeclipse 27.3 HA
Average 21.4 HA
We use an average of four tests. The photo shows one of those tests.
Compared to 232 running shoes
Number of shoes
8.5 HA
Midsole softness (soft to firm)
41.5 HA

Midsole softness in cold

Note: a low durometer measurement equals a soft material, whereas a high measurement means it's firm.

To check how the Cloudeclipse performs in extremely cold conditions, we froze it for 20 minutes. Once done, we tested it again and discovered that the softness changed to 32.3 HA.

On Cloudeclipse Midsole softness in cold
Test results
Cloudeclipse 32.3 HA
Average 26.5 HA
Compared to 231 running shoes
Number of shoes
12.4 HA
Midsole softness in cold (soft to firm)
51.3 HA

Difference in midsole softness in cold

It's only an 18.3% increase, but since this shoe is already firm, it will feel even firmer.

Test results
Cloudeclipse 18.3%
Average 25.5%
Compared to 231 running shoes
Number of shoes
0%
Difference in midsole softness in cold
100%

Stability

Lateral stability test

Just before, when we discussed the midsole softness, we briefly mentioned the X-shaped TPU Speedboard plate. Looking at the dimensions of the shoe, it seems clear to us that it's On's main feature to enhance stability. But does it work?

Well, it does. With its massive stack height and lack of support elements, we found it decently stable, but only for neutral runners. However, we don't think it's a good option for those who need extra stability. If that's you, check out something like the Hoka Gaviota 5.

Torsional rigidity

With a TPU plate, the torsional rigidity can't be as low as 2 or 3. In fact, we rated it at 4 out of 5. It does a good job keeping the shoe flat and stable during every landing.

Test results
Cloudeclipse 4
Average 3.2
Compared to 283 running shoes
Number of shoes
1
Torsional rigidity
5

Heel counter stiffness

The heel counter appeared pretty average to us, providing enough flexibility to be comfortable for any runner. We gave it a 3 out of 5, which is in line with most road running shoes.

Test results
Cloudeclipse 3
Average 2.8
Compared to 267 running shoes
Number of shoes
1
Heel counter stiffness
5

Midsole width in the forefoot

At just 112.4 mm wide, the shoe is surprisingly narrow considering its massive stack height.

This has its upsides—it doesn't feel clunky at all—and its downsides—it slightly hinders stability. But the cool part is that it stays true to On's DNA, and that's always a good thing.

On Cloudeclipse Midsole width in the forefoot
Test results
Cloudeclipse 112.4 mm
Average 113.7 mm
Compared to 305 running shoes
Number of shoes
100.5 mm
Midsole width in the forefoot
126.5 mm

Midsole width in the heel

In the heel, it's wider than average, measuring 92.0 mm with our callipers.

While this is mostly average, it's good news for heel strikers, especially when combined with the previously mentioned 9.0-mm drop of the shoe.

On Cloudeclipse Midsole width in the heel
Test results
Cloudeclipse 92.0 mm
Average 90.5 mm
Compared to 305 running shoes
Number of shoes
74.9 mm
Midsole width in the heel
106.6 mm

Flexibility

We're certain that On aimed to place the Cloudeclipse in the "max stack" category, and they've succeeded. At 39.9 mm, it's just below the World Athletics race-day legal regulation, and it really feels high on every run.

This makes it a fantastic option for heel strikers who need plenty of cushion underfoot, as well as for those looking for a reliable, set-and-forget shoe for long runs. However, we can also confirm that due to the massive stack, it's not the best shoe for tackling corners.

Stiffness

As a versatile shoe that needs to handle a wide range of paces, it's important for it to be somewhat flexible from a longitudinal standpoint. Fortunately, it is.

With 28.0N of force required for flexibility, it's just average, similar to your reliable daily trainer.

Test results
Cloudeclipse 28.0N
Average 29.2N
We use an average of four tests. The video shows one of those tests.
Compared to 287 running shoes
Number of shoes
2.2N
Stiffness
94.4N

Stiffness in cold

We repeated the 20-minute freezing test to see how stiff the shoe gets in harsh winter conditions. Afterward, it took us 37.7N of force to bend the shoe. That's not as flexible anymore!

Test results
Cloudeclipse 37.7N
Average 38.3N
Compared to 287 running shoes
Number of shoes
2.5N
Stiffness in cold
110.2N

Difference in stiffness in cold

The jump between the two tests is 34.6%, and although it's below average, the difference is definitely significant and hard to ignore.

Test results
Cloudeclipse 34.6%
Average 35.9%
Compared to 287 running shoes
Number of shoes
0%
Difference in stiffness in cold
148%

Size and fit

Toebox width at the widest part

In our lab tests, we noticed that On often leans towards narrow designs. However, with the Cloudeclipse, they've pleasantly surprised us with an average-sized toebox.

On Cloudeclipse

Our measurements show it's 98.6 mm wide, offering ample room for most feet. This ensures comfort during even the longest training runs.

On Cloudeclipse Toebox width at the widest part
Test results
Cloudeclipse 98.6 mm
Average 98.4 mm
Compared to 305 running shoes
Number of shoes
89.5 mm
Toebox width at the widest part
109.1 mm

Toebox width at the big toe

The big toe area is impressively wider than average at 79.7 mm, featuring a subtle taper. We really love this design—it allows the shoe to become a mainstay in any rotation for the long stuff.

On Cloudeclipse Toebox width at the big toe
Test results
Cloudeclipse 79.7 mm
Average 78.2 mm
Compared to 179 running shoes
Number of shoes
60.4 mm
Toebox width at the big toe
92.5 mm

Tongue: gusset type

The tongue is fully gusseted to the sides of the shoe, ensuring a proper lockdown. This is exactly what we expect from a premium-priced shoe at £180.

On Cloudeclipse Tongue: gusset type
Test results
Cloudeclipse Both sides (full)

Comfort

Tongue padding

We found the tongue to be sufficiently padded, and our measurement of 4.8 mm confirms this, even though it's below the average.

On Cloudeclipse tongue

It's extremely unlikely that anyone will have issues with the instep from tightening the laces too hard. This is important, considering this shoe is designed for long endurance runs.

On Cloudeclipse Tongue padding
Test results
Cloudeclipse 4.8 mm
Average 5.6 mm
Compared to 302 running shoes
Number of shoes
0.5 mm
Tongue padding
14.2 mm

Heel tab

In our experience, this shoe doesn't really need it from a practical standpoint, but adding a heel tab would've been a nice touch for looks...

On Cloudeclipse Heel tab
Test results
Cloudeclipse None

Removable insole

The insole in the On Cloudeclipse is removable, and we easily fitted other insoles into the shoe.

On Cloudeclipse Removable insole
Test results
Cloudeclipse Yes

Misc

Reflective elements

One of the easiest and coolest ways to add reflective elements to a running shoe is by using a reflective brand logo. That's exactly what On did. Doesn't it look super cool?

Test results
Cloudeclipse Yes