Updates to Danner Mountain Pass

  • The Danner Mountain Pass is equipped for day-long trail adventures yet versatile enough for urban strolls and city walks. It borrows the design of the brand’s Mountain Light hiker.
  • This boot has different upper variants. Select models are made for hot-weather hikes while the others are watertight. The stitch down construction gives it a wider base.
  • This boot has its midsole, shank, and lasting board molded into a single construction called Bi-Fit board. By unifying all three components, Danner engineers have made the footgear’s weight significantly lighter.
  • It is part of Danner’s collection of recraftable shoes. This means owners can have its worn-out outsole replaced for a fee.

Size and fit

The Mountain Pass is a mid-cut, generally true-to-size boot for both male and female hikers. Its sizing selection consists of a combination of full and half sizes. The men’s version is offered in 2E – wide, while the women’s gear may be had in B – standard. Its quick lacing system grants wearers the ability to customize the footwear’s fit.

The men’s version is built on Danner’s 503 last which is wide at the forefoot and has a bit of additional space in the toe box, granting the wearer a casual fit. On the other hand, the women’s Mountain Pass has a low-profile fit created by the 329 last.

Outsole

Day hikers are promised terrain security with Vibram’s Kletterlift Thin outsole. Its slip-resistant surface is laden with long-wearing lugs arranged in such a way that helps users cover miles with adequate grip performance. It has been constructed with a lower profile (thus the “Thin” part in its name) to lessen the boot’s weight further, allowing users to hike with agility in improved comfort.

Midsole

Danner’s Mountain Pass has a slim yet sturdy midsole for cushioning, shock absorption, and stability. It comes integrated with a sturdy shank, bolstering the boot’s underfoot support around the arch zone. Its tapered construction leaves the boot with a rather slender silhouette.

Contributing to the comfort offered by the midsole is the Mountain Pass’ Ortholite insole. This removable footbed is comprised of three multi-density layers made of polyurethane (PU) for improved support and cushioning.

Upper

The Danner Mountain Pass is available in four variants for men and three for women. All models come with an upper made of full-grain leather, a material known for its durability. The others are combined with Horween leather that creates a distinct aesthetic. Select models are infused with a leather-lined collar to grant extra padding and shorten the break-in time.

There are variants best suited for hikes under warm weather. These are lined with a breathable, quick-drying, and odor-resistant liner called Dri-Lex. Others have a GTX membrane, rendering them suitable for adventures with water encounters.

Responsible for giving users a firm lockdown with a dialed-in fit is the Mountain Pass’ speed lacing system. Its metallic hardware consists of combination eyelets, with the bottom set made up of D-rings and the top batch comprised of open hooks. Its sturdy laces, on the other hand, are made up of synthetic cords interwoven together.

Nice to know

-For users who want black hiking boots, this is a product to consider.

-Other day hiking options from by the bootmaker: Danner Light and Danner Mountain 600.

Rankings

How Danner Mountain Pass ranks compared to all other shoes
Top 2% hiking boots
All hiking boots
Top 8% Danner hiking boots
All Danner hiking boots
Top 9% light hiking hiking boots
All light hiking hiking boots

Popularity

The current trend of Danner Mountain Pass.
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Author
Paul Ronto
Paul Ronto

Over the past 20 years, Paul has climbed, hiked, and ran all over the world. He has summited peaks throughout the Americas, trekked through Africa, and tested his endurance in 24-hour trail races as well as 6 marathons. On average, he runs 30-50 miles a week in the foothills of Northern Colorado. His research is regularly cited in The New York Times, Washington Post, National Geographic, etc. On top of this, Paul is leading the running shoe lab where he cuts shoes apart and analyses every detail of the shoes that you might buy.