Verdict from 9.3 hours of research from the internet

72
Decent!
111 users: 4 / 5

7 reasons to buy

  • Many wearers have lauded the comfortable nature of the Adidas CrazyTrain Pro.
  • Numerous people praised its breathable upper.
  • The shoe’s fashion-forward design received a myriad of compliments from reviewers.
  • Its versatility to handle both high-impact cardio workouts and weightlifting astonished most gym buffs.
  • A few buyers were impressed with the footwear’s affordable price and good quality.
  • Some fitness enthusiasts were astonished that it was lightweight yet still able to give enough support during workouts.
  • Those who have ankle injuries liked that it provided heel protection and support.

2 reasons not to buy

  • A majority of the purchasers reported that the sizing of the Adidas CrazyTrain Pro was bigger than usual.
  • A small number of discerning consumers have noticed that the upper’s material seemed flimsy and prone to losing shape.

Bottom line

The Adidas CrazyTrain Pro is a good-looking, comfortable, and breathable cross-training shoe that was generally lauded by the users. Its lightweight nature, versatility, heel protection, and support contribute to the athletic performance, as claimed by the reviewers. Its inexpensive price and good quality were valued by them as well. However, its big sizing and flimsy and easily deformed upper annoyed a majority of the purchasers. Overall, the footwear was deemed appropriate for both dynamic cardio-focused activities and heavy-duty weightlifting workouts.

Tip: see the best training shoes.

User reviews:

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The Adidas CrazyTrain Pro is specially designed to fulfill the demands of multifunctional training sessions. The women’s and men’s versions have different designs specific to each gender’s tastes and needs.

- The women’s model has an upper made of layered textile. This lightweight material enhances ventilation. It has a distinct padded collar that is tailored to fit the woman’s proportions. It is built to conform to the ankle. The adjustable medial and lateral flaps hug the midfoot for a truly customized fit. It also serves as forefoot and midfoot support.

- On the other hand, the men’s iteration has a synthetic and engineered textile with a sock-like forefoot fit. It locks down the foot and prevents it from moving around during workouts. The side panels and heel have been reinforced for additional support. Regardless of the differences, both of the uppers have the same lightness, comfort, and breathability.

The midsole uses the brand's proprietary Bounce technology to deliver responsive cushioning. It also cradles the foot to give a cozy underfoot sensation despite the strenuous foot movements involved in vigorous workouts.

The outsole also varies for the two versions. Both are made of rubber, but the men’s tread has a more compact micro-herringbone pattern for seamless multi-directional movements.  Meanwhile, the women’s version has a looser pattern that’s designed for improved traction and forefoot flexibility.

The Adidas CrazyTrain Pro comes in both men’s and women’s versions. It tends to run on the large side, so it may be necessary to order half-a-size to a full size down. The width measurement is D – Medium for the men’s version and B – Medium for the women’s version.

The Adidas CrazyTrain Pro has a non-marking outsole that is made of rubber for durability and sticky traction. This is where the similarities end for the two versions.

The men’s variant has a micro-herringbone tread pattern to allow for easier lateral and horizontal changes of direction. On the other hand, the women’s shoe has a multi-patterned tread that is specially designed to promote natural forefoot flexion and stronger grip.

The Bounce technology is utilized in the midsole of the Adidas CrazyTrain Pro. It provides a firm, responsive and bouncy cushioning. It also offers flexibility, impact protection, and responsiveness with every step. This type of cushioning can also be found on a more recent Adidas Alphabounce Trainer.

The Adidas CrazyTrain Pro has a differing upper for the men’s and women’s version. The men’s shoe has a lightweight and breathable upper made from synthetic and engineered textiles. It has a snug fit at the forefoot and fortified heel and side panels for a locked-down fit and optimal support.

An external heel counter is installed at the bottom for additional support during fast movements on agility drills. It prevents the accidental heel slippage by locking in the foot into the shoe.

The footwear is lined with a comfortable textile lining. It envelops the foot in its plush softness and wicks away sweat.

It uses a traditional lacing system with webbed eyelets that tightens the medial and lateral areas. Aside from adjusting the tightness of the shoe, it also delivers lateral support.

On the contrary, the women’s lightweight upper is made of layered textiles for maximum breathability. It is secured with an adjustable forefoot and midfoot support to ensure that the foot stays in place during medial and lateral movements.

It has a padded collar that is specially engineered for the woman’s contours. It conforms to the ankle for additional support.

Size and fit

True to size based on 22 user votes
Small (3%)
True to size (78%)
Large (17%)
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Same sizing as Adidas CrazyTrain Pro 3.0.

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How CrazyTrain Pro compares

This shoe: 72
All shoes average: 84
57 96
This shoe: £100
All shoes average: £90
£30 £300
Author
Nicholas Rizzo
Nicholas Rizzo

Nick is a powerlifter who believes cardio comes in the form of more heavy ass squats. Based on over 1.5 million lifts done at competitions, his PRs place him as an elite level powerlifter. His PRs have him sitting in the top 2% of bench presses (395 lbs), top 3% of squats (485 lbs) and top 6% of deadlifts (515 lbs) for his weight and age. His work has been featured on Forbes, Bodybuilding.com, Elite Daily and the like. Collaborating along the way with industry leaders like Michael Yessis, Mark Rippetoe, Carlo Buzzichelli, Dave Tate, Ray Williams, and Joel Seedman.

nick@runrepeat.com