Our verdict

The Rush TRK GTX from Scarpa struck us as an exceptionally supportive boot that's capable of pulling off pretty challenging multi-day hikes. We discovered that it is fully equipped to ensure more daring strides on rocky, root-strewn, and even muddy terrain. Not only were ankle rolls out of the question but soaking wet feet too! As long as you give it a proper break-in before the trip, we promise that this Scarpa boot will deliver on every demand you have on a tough backpacking adventure.

Pros

  • Fantastic stability for backpacking
  • Extra secure ankle support
  • Reasonable weight given the shoe's design
  • Excellent underfoot protection
  • Great grip on soft and technical terrain
  • Warm and watertight upper
  • Spacious toebox (wide-foot friendly)
  • High-quality materials and craftsmanship

Cons

  • Not for narrow feet
  • Break-in needed

Audience verdict

89
Great!

Who should buy

We believe that the Scarpa Rush TRK GTX is an excellent choice for outdoor enthusiasts who need:

  • a stable and supportive high-cut boot for multi-day thru-hikes
  • a boot with deep lugs (4.0 mm) and solid grip to traverse wet or muddy trails
  • a sealed waterproof boot that keeps the feet dry and warm

Scarpa Rush TRK GTX who should buy

Who should NOT buy

At $249, the Rush TRK GTX isn't quite as light on our wallet as it felt on our feet. We suggest checking out the Salomon Quest 4 GTX which is cheaper by $20 but is just as technical and supportive. It is also our long-standing top pick among backpacking boots

While the Scarpa Rush TRK GTX is a comfy boot for its kind, we found that it took a while before we fully unlocked its true potential. As an alternative that isn't so rigid and more comfortable for all-day wear, have a look at the Lowa Renegade GTX Mid.

Scarpa Rush TRK GTX cut

Breathability

Having a Gore-Tex membrane normally doesn't bode well for breathability. A boot's ability to keep water from penetrating its interiors usually means that it's pretty airtight too.

As our smoke test shows, this is clearly the case with the Rush TRK GTX. Not even a wisp of smoke managed to escape the boot's upper throughout the 10-second test. 

The KEEN NXIS Speed's airy mesh upper, on the other hand, is much better suited for hot days.

The boot's well-insulated nature was further confirmed upon inspecting a backlit cross-section of the upper. We saw that it entirely blocked out the light below! Apparently, there are no potential areas for heat to escape the boot. 

The toastiness of the Rush TRK GTX can't be attributed solely to the Gore-Tex lining, however, as its upper is made of solid suede and leather overlays with no gaps in the materials for ventilation.

Scarpa Rush TRK GTX Breathability microscope

While this isn't ideal for hot summer hikes, it does mean that frost-bitten toes were the least of our concerns while testing this boot in more frigid conditions. 

Scarpa Rush TRK GTX Breathability material close up
Test results
Rush TRK GTX 1
Average 1.6
Compared to 25 hiking boots
Number of shoes
1
Breathability
5

Durability

Toebox durability

For what it lacks in breathability, the Rush TRK GTX's suede toebox turns out to be extremely tough.

We tested this with our Dremel which was set against the unprotected part of the boot's toebox with 3.2N of force spinning at 5K RPM. 

After 12 seconds of grinding, the Rush TRK GTX was left with a barely noticeable scuff at the point of contact. This excellent performance led us to give the Rush TRK GTX a perfect toebox durability score of 5 out of 5!

Add to that the boot's tough toe rand and you need not worry about any bumps or scrapes ruining the integrity of the toebox, even when traversing rough-and-ready terrains. 

Scarpa Rush TRK GTX Toebox durability damage
Test results
Rush TRK GTX 5
Average 4.4
Compared to 21 hiking boots
Number of shoes
1
Toebox durability
5

Heel padding durability

Next, we turn our attention to another potentially vulnerable portion of the boot - the heel collar lining.

But to our amazement, the Rush TRK GTX nailed our durability test even in such a delicate part of the upper!

Looking as if it was never touched with sandpaper, the boot's inner lining earned the highest durability score from us - 5 out of 5!

Scarpa Rush TRK GTX Heel padding durability damage
Test results
Rush TRK GTX 5
Average 4
Compared to 21 hiking boots
Number of shoes
1
Heel padding durability
5

Outsole hardness

The Rush TRK GTX features Scarpa's proprietary PRESA compound in the outsole, Even though it's not the industry-leading Vibram rubber, it showed pretty solid results in our durability tests.

Scarpa Rush TRK GTX Outsole hardness durometer

First of all, this rubber compound is hard. And that is usually synonymous with hard-wearing.

When we pressed our Shore C durometer against the boot's outsole, the tool recorded a high reading of 90.0 HC. It is even a touch harder than the average.

Test results
Rush TRK GTX 90.0 HC
Average 87.7 HC
We use an average of four tests. The photo shows one of those tests.
Compared to 25 hiking boots
Number of shoes
81.0 HC
Outsole hardness
92.1 HC

Outsole durability

In our next step, we felt hard on the rubber by setting our Dremel speed to 10K RPM and holding sandpaper against one of the lugs for 22 seconds.

Given Scarpa's stellar reputation for durability, we weren't even surprised with the result. Our tread gauge measured a shallow 0.9 mm indentation in the boot's outsole.

This confirmed our initial assumptions of the boot's potentially long shelf life.

Scarpa Rush TRK GTX Outsole durability damage
Test results
Rush TRK GTX 0.9 mm
Average 0.7 mm
Compared to 18 hiking boots
Number of shoes
0.0 mm
Outsole wear
2.0 mm

Outsole thickness

We also found the amount of rubber at the bottom of the Scarpa Rush TRK GTX to be sufficient for a backpacking boot.

Scarpa Rush TRK GTX Outsole thickness caliper

With a caliper measurement of 2.3 mm (excluding the 4.0 mm lugs), this Scarpa boot promises a good while before it starts to lose integrity.

Test results
Rush TRK GTX 2.3 mm
Average 3.0 mm
Compared to 25 hiking boots
Number of shoes
1.8 mm
Outsole thickness
5.6 mm

Weight

Even though the Scarpa Rush TRK GTX clocked in more ounces than the average hiking boot, we deem its weight as reasonable for a backpacking boot.

Scarpa Rush TRK GTX Weight

Our scale recorded 20.0 oz (567g) in a men's US size 9 which is on par with the brand's other boots like the Scarpa Terra GTX and the Scarpa Boreas GTX.

Scarpa Rush TRK GTX boot weight

For the amount of technologies and high-quality materials packed into the Rush TRK, we consider its weight to be fair.

Test results
Rush TRK GTX 20.00 oz (567g)
Average 18.48 oz (524g)
Compared to 25 hiking boots
Number of shoes
11.71 oz (332g)
Weight
28.29 oz (802g)

Cushioning

Heel stack

The Rush TRK GTX is a chunky beast that boasts a 41.8 mm heel stack. This is notably higher than our current lab average which leaves us with plenty of protective foam and rubber underfoot. As a result, our landings felt safe as our heels were kept high above the trail hazards like sharp rocks and sticking roots.

Scarpa Rush TRK GTX Heel stack caliper

The Rush TRK GTX almost entirely muted out any sense of the trail which really helped in staving off soreness and foot fatigue. That said, for hikers who prefer a more grounded boot when traversing difficult terrains, we suggest checking out the Scarpa Terra GTX as an alternative.

Test results
Rush TRK GTX 41.8 mm
Average 36.3 mm
Compared to 25 hiking boots
Number of shoes
26.2 mm
Heel stack
46.9 mm

Forefoot stack

The forefoot, on the other hand, isn't quite as elevated. At 22.3 mm, the Rush TRK GTX's stack falls more in line with the average.

Scarpa Rush TRK GTX Forefoot stack caliper

But that was still enough to protect our feet from impact or harsh objects underfoot while also giving us a fair amount of ground feel for intuitive toe-offs.

Test results
Rush TRK GTX 23.3 mm
Average 22.5 mm
Compared to 25 hiking boots
Number of shoes
17.0 mm
Forefoot stack
30.7 mm

Drop

The difference in our stack measurements leaves us with a rather drastic offset of 18.5 mm.

Scarpa Rush TRK GTX Drop

This higher-than-average drop elevated our heels above the toes, maximizing heel cushioning and ankle support.

We believe that most hikers with heavy backpacks will appreciate this setup on a multi-day hike because it engages foot and ankle muscles much less. This, in turn, helps to minimize fatigue in the long haul.

Test results
Rush TRK GTX 18.5 mm
Average 13.8 mm
Compared to 25 hiking boots
Number of shoes
2.6 mm
Drop
20.9 mm

Midsole softness

Note: a low durometer measurement equals a soft material, whereas a high measurement means it's firm.

Plush cushioning doesn't make sense in a backpacking boot as it could do more harm than good. You need a firmer platform to rely on when navigating tricky terrain.

Pressing our durometer against the shoe's primary cushioning foam returned 29.6 HA. This is about 10% firmer than average but is on oar with other backpacking boots we've tested in the lab.

Scarpa Rush TRK GTX Midsole softness durometer
Test results
Rush TRK GTX 29.6 HA
Average 27.1 HA
We use an average of four tests. The photo shows one of those tests.
Compared to 25 hiking boots
Number of shoes
15.4 HA
Midsole softness (soft to firm)
53.3 HA

Difference in midsole softness in cold

Gladly, that foam doesn't get much harder in cold conditions!

Scarpa Rush TRK GTX Difference in midsole softness in cold

After keeping the Rush TRK GTX in the freezer for 20 minutes and retaking the durometer measurement, we recorded a mere 9.3% difference! It is notably lower than the average of hiking boots.

Test results
Rush TRK GTX 9.3%
Average 19.3%
Compared to 25 hiking boots
Number of shoes
0%
Difference in midsole softness in cold
100%

Secondary foam softness

Note: a low durometer measurement equals a soft material, whereas a high measurement means it's firm.

But if the Scarpa Rush TRK is so firm, where does all that comfort and impact protection come from? The secret lies in the boot's dual-density midsole.

Scarpa Rush TRK GTX Secondary foam softness durometer

Those red inserts under the heels and balls of the foot are made of much softer foam, a whopping 74% softer, to be precise!

This component is a much-needed touch of responsiveness to the otherwise pretty unforgiving setup.

Test results
Rush TRK GTX 17.0 HA
We use an average of four tests. The photo shows one of those tests.

Insole thickness

Another important component of the boot's underfoot experience is a well-padded insole.

Scarpa Rush TRK GTX Insole thickness

Measuring its thickness with a caliper, we got 5.8 mm in the heel. This is similar to the other hiking boot insoles we've checked.

Test results
Rush TRK GTX 5.8 mm
Average 6.1 mm
Compared to 25 hiking boots
Number of shoes
3.7 mm
Insole thickness
10.7 mm

Stability

Lateral stability test

We were amazed at the incredible side-to-side containment of the Rush TRK GTX as well as the confidence it inspires for backpacking adventures on challenging terrain.

Coming from a brand that is obsessed with technical footwear for the mountains, this Scarpa boot has met all of our high-set expectations in terms of lateral support and stability.

Torsional rigidity

The boot's ultra-rigid construction leaves no chance to ankle rolls. Attempting to twist it in our manual test, we felt no give whatsoever!

That was the easiest 5 out of 5 score for torsional rigidity this week!

The Rush TRK's high-cut collar, stiff upper, firm sole, and sturdy plastic DST (Dynamic Stabilizer Torsion) frame all created cast-like support that never once allowed our ankles to buckle.

Scarpa Rush TRK GTX DST (Dynamic Stabilizer Torsion) frame

Test results
Rush TRK GTX 5
Average 4.3
Compared to 25 hiking boots
Number of shoes
1
Torsional rigidity
5

Heel counter stiffness

The stiff and structured heel counter of the Scarpa Rush TRK GTX further enhanced a death grip around our heels and ankles.

On a 1-5 scale, where 5 is the stiffest heel counter among hiking boots, our manual push-and-squeeze test returned a clear 5!

But that's not all...

Scarpa Rush TRK GTX 3D Auto-fit Ankle Collar

If you look at the boot's half-cut upper, you will see a bumpy area where the ankle bone sits inside the boot. That is Scarpa's so-called 3D Auto-fit Ankle Collar or molded foam. It complements the boot's rigid heel collar with plush and padded support from inside the Rush TRK.

Test results
Rush TRK GTX 5
Average 3.5
Compared to 25 hiking boots
Number of shoes
1
Heel counter stiffness
5

Midsole width in the forefoot

Compared to most other rugged backpacking boots, the Scarpa Rush TRK GTX has a rather moderate platform width.

Scarpa Rush TRK GTX Midsole width in the forefoot

It doesn't extend past the average, showing a typical 110.3 mm measurement on our caliper. For reference, the Salomon Quest 4 GTX comes in at 116.5 mm, and the Hoka Kaha 2 GTX showed 117.0 mm in the same area.

Test results
Rush TRK GTX 110.3 mm
Average 111.6 mm
Compared to 25 hiking boots
Number of shoes
96.3 mm
Midsole width in the forefoot
124.6 mm

Midsole width in the heel

The heel portion of the Rush TRK GTX's sole does not go past the average either. The boot checked in at the standard 87.0 mm in the widest part of the heel.

Scarpa Rush TRK GTX Midsole width in the heel

We found that the boot's slimmer profile did not compromise stability at all but instead helped the Rush TRK shave off some bulk!

Test results
Rush TRK GTX 87.0 mm
Average 87.9 mm
Compared to 25 hiking boots
Number of shoes
71.7 mm
Midsole width in the heel
106.1 mm

Flexibility

Stiffness

If you only approve of the stiffest boots for traversing rocky trails with a heavy load, the Scarpa Rush TRK GTX proved to be one of the least flexible options on our roster!

It takes 60% more force than average to bend this Scarpa boot to a 90-degree angle! Our force gauge returned 70.6 while the average hovers around 40-45N.

Scarpa Rush TRK GTX stiff sole

Test results
Rush TRK GTX 70.6N
Average 44.9N
We use an average of four tests. The video shows one of those tests.
Compared to 25 hiking boots
Number of shoes
16.6N
Stiffness
84.7N

Grip / Traction

Lug depth

The Scarpa Rush TRK GTX is studded with deep 4.0 mm lugs which proved its effectiveness in the most demanding trail conditions.

Scarpa Rush TRK GTX Lug depth caliper

Hiking on rocky paths and gravel, squelching through mud, and stepping on moss-covered logs all felt very secure thanks to the boot's grippy outsole.

Scarpa Rush TRK GTX Lug depth tread
Test results
Rush TRK GTX 4.0 mm
Average 4.2 mm
Compared to 25 hiking boots
Number of shoes
3.0 mm
Lug depth
5.8 mm

Size and fit

Toebox width at the widest part

The Rush TRK GTX's toebox is quite spacious compared to the average hiking boot, measuring 104.3 mm wide at its widest point according to our caliper. As such, the Rush TRK GTX should comfortably accommodate most hikers, especially those prone to swelling during long hikes or those with broad feet. 

Scarpa Rush TRK GTX Toebox width at the widest part

That said, this extra internal real estate isn't as suitable for narrow-footed hikers as their feet might shift around within the boot, especially during descents on uneven terrain. This can lead to discomfort and/or blisters so we highly recommend trying on the boot as sizing down might be necessary.

Scarpa Rush TRK GTX Toebox width at the widest part standing

Alternatively, the La Sportiva Ultra Raptor II Mid GTX is a better option for those in need of a more snug and locked-in fit for their outdoor adventures. 

Test results
Rush TRK GTX 104.3 mm
Average 101.8 mm
Compared to 25 hiking boots
Number of shoes
95.5 mm
Toebox width at the widest part
110.2 mm

Toebox width at the big toe

The Rush TRK GTX's toebox tapers quite significantly towards the big toe, becoming 78.8 mm wide in this part of the boot according to our caliper measurements. This is still on par with our current lab average and gives us a good amount of room to splay out without feeling too constricted within the boot. 

Scarpa Rush TRK GTX Toebox width at the big toe
Test results
Rush TRK GTX 78.8 mm
Average 78.4 mm
Compared to 25 hiking boots
Number of shoes
67.6 mm
Toebox width at the big toe
91.1 mm

Tongue: gusset type

As is typically the case with waterproof hiking boots, the Rush TRK GTX's tongue is fully gusseted on both sides. Not only does this prevent water from seeping in, but it also protects our feet from any bits of grit or debris that might make their way into the boot. 

Scarpa Rush TRK GTX Tongue: gusset type
Test results
Rush TRK GTX Both sides (full)

Comfort

Tongue padding

Using our caliper, we measured the Rush TRK GTX's tongue to be 9.5 mm thick. While this is a little shy of our current lab average, it still leaves us with plenty of a buffer between our feet and the laces.

Scarpa Rush TRK GTX Tongue padding caliper

As such, it feels very comfortable across our instep, with lace bite never being an issue during our test hikes no matter how tightly we cinched up the boot. 

Scarpa Rush TRK GTX Tongue padding laces
Test results
Rush TRK GTX 9.5 mm
Average 11.0 mm
Compared to 25 hiking boots
Number of shoes
5.9 mm
Tongue padding
22.3 mm

Heel tab

The Rush TRK GTX has a convenient finger loop at the heel that makes sliding the boot on feel a little quicker and smoother. 

Scarpa Rush TRK GTX Heel tab
Test results
Rush TRK GTX Finger loop

Removable insole

The insole isn't glued in so replacing it with an aftermarket alternative or a custom orthotic is possible if necessary. 

Scarpa Rush TRK GTX Removable insole
Test results
Rush TRK GTX Yes

Misc

Reflective elements

The Rush TRK GTX doesn't feature any reflective elements in its construction. We, therefore, recommend using additional high-vis gear for better night-time visibility in situations where it is required. 

Scarpa Rush TRK GTX Reflective elements
Test results
Rush TRK GTX No