Facts

  • Use

    Workout

    Shoes with optimum cushioning, lateral support, and flexibility for daily workouts and studio sessions. See workout shoes

    CrossFit

    Versatile, low-profile shoes for constantly varied exercises including plyometrics, sprinting, weightlifting, and rope climbing. See CrossFit shoes

    Weightlifting

    Heavy-duty shoes with a wedge and an elevated heel that create a sturdy platform and promote ankle mobility. See weightlifting shoes

    Walking

    Shoes for daily wear that ensure a smooth walking gait cycle. Check out walking shoes

  • Arch support

    Neutral

    For people with normal pronation. Also provide support for high-arched feet with underpronation (excessive outward rolling of the foot). See neutral training shoes

    Stability

    For people with low-arched or flat feet and moderate overpronation (excessive inward rolling of the foot). See stability training shoes

    Motion control

    Shoes feature stabilizing technologies for people with severe overpronation. See motion control training shoes

    Good to know

    Stability and motion control add-ons are uncommon for workout shoes and are never present in CrossFit or weightlifting footwear. They are mostly found in walking shoes where the gait is easier to correct.

  • Price
    $60
  • Weight
    Men: 12.1oz
    Women: 9.7oz

    Weight

    Training footwear typically weighs between 200g and 300g per shoe to accommodate agile workouts. Minimalist trainers go as low as 150g, while weightlifting shoes can go as high as 500g.

  • Width
    Men: X-Wide, Normal
    Women: Normal, Wide
  • Release date
    Unknown
Show more facts

Rankings

  • The Reebok Work N Cushion 3.0 is engineered to provide comfort and protection for people whose jobs involve long bouts of walking or standing. It has retained the key features of its predecessor while upgrading the underfoot experience through new additions.
  • This model still has a low-cut profile for ankle mobility. It also facilitates easier transitions during direction changes.
  • It employs the Memory Tech LT sockliner for cushioning. It is made to deliver bouncy responsiveness that helps propel the foot forward with every step.
  • An ethylene-vinyl acetate (EVA) foam midsole serves as a stabilizing platform. It also cushions against impact.

The Reebok Work N Cushion 3.0 has versions made for men and women to accommodate their specific foot shapes and sizes. It tends to run true to size and follows the standard shoe sizing scheme. It comes in two width options: D - Medium and 4E - Extra Wide for men and B - Medium and 4E - Extra Wide for women.

High abrasion rubber runs the entire length of the bottom of the Reebok Work N Cushion 3.0. This oil and slip-resistant material aims to enhance traction on different types of surfaces. It is also durable to shield the foot from feeling the rocks and other sharp objects on the ground.

The heel has been beveled to boost walking stride efficiency. It encourages the heel to roll forward smoothly during the walking gait cycle.

The Memory Tech LT sockliner cradles the foot. It conforms to the contours of the sole for even coverage of shock absorption and cushioning.

The shoe utilizes an EVA foam for the midsole. It is created to be shock absorbent to lessen the impact upon footstrike. This sole unit is also characterized by its responsiveness that springs the foot forward during the heel- to toe-off phase.

The Reebok Work N Cushion 3.0 has a low-cut design. It grants unrestricted ankle mobility that allows for quick multidirectional transitions.

A combination of leather and synthetic materials comprises the upper. It protects and supports the foot during side-to-side movements.

Mesh lines the walls of the foot chamber. It is breathable enough to allow the air to circulate through the interiors and wicks away moisture and sweat.

The trainer utilizes a traditional lacing system to secure the foot in place. It lets the wearers adjust the fit according to their preferences. On the other hand, the KC version has a hook-and-loop closure.

Comparison