Our verdict

Sometimes, we just get tired of those flashy colours on outdoor shoes and just want something more elegant, something that looks more city-friendly. Well, the Teva Grandview GTX Low, proves to be just that with its partially leather upper and classic hues. Not to mention that it feels plusher than a typical hiking shoe. And if you also crave more toebox space, we believe this Teva shoe is a match made in heaven!

Pros

  • Excellent waterproofing
  • Softer than average cushioning
  • Great impact protection
  • Remains soft and flexible in low temps
  • Very stable and supportive
  • Deep lugs with top-notch grip
  • Comfortable in-shoe feel
  • Good wear resistance
  • A dream for wide feet

Cons

  • Heavier than average
  • Not for narrow feet
  • Heel lock is fiddly

Audience verdict

73
Bad!

Who should buy

We believe that the Grandview GTX Low is a must to consider if you are after the following:

  • an exceptionally wide and roomy toebox for wide feet
  • a more subdued, semi-casual look in a hiking shoe
  • soft cushioning that will support you all day

Teva Grandview GTX Low review

Who should NOT buy

If you prefer a more close-fitting shoe and a slightly taller collar, we highly recommend the Salomon X Ultra 4 GTX. For the same price, it ticks all of the same boxes as the Grandview GTX Low but does it even better.

And if you like everything about this Teva shoe but worry about stepping in the water too deep, do get the Grandview GTX Mid.

Teva Grandview GTX Low lab test

Breathability

With its waterproof membrane and dense leather upper, we didn't really expect breathability from the Grandview GTX Low.

However, it did turn out to be more ventilated than its mid-top version thanks to the low collar and gaps in between the tongue and the quarters. As you can see from our smoke-pumping test below, the smoke is able to come out freely from the mentioned area.

For that reason, we rated the shoe's breathability with a slightly higher score of 2 out of 5.

We also noticed that the woven fabric on the shoe's toebox didn't let any air out, so we turned to our microscope to take a closer look.

Teva Grandview GTX Low microscope

It is indeed a very densely woven material that adds reassurance in this Teva's impermeable nature. We also found it to be a pretty quick-drying and water-phobic material. It shed the drops instantly and never soaked them up.

Teva Grandview GTX Low microscope upper

Test results
Grandview GTX Low 2
Average 2.8
Compared to 15 hiking shoes
1
Breathability
5
Number of shoes

Waterproofing

The star of the shoe is of course the world-known Gore-Tex membrane. We found that it worked magnificently in the rain and light puddles, keeping our feet nice and dry.

However, do take into account the shoe's low-cut collar. If water happens to flood over its edges and into the shoe, it is going to stay there for a while. So, if you expect to step into some deep creeks and puddles, getting the mid-cut Grandview GTX boot is a better idea.

Teva Grandview GTX Low gore-tex

Durability

Toebox durability

At first, we were a bit concerned about the shoe's fabric toebox. But our worries evaporated the moment our Dremel began to drill.

After 12 seconds of applying the tool at consistent pressure (3.2N) and speed (5K RPM), we were amazed at how light the damage was! Where some shoes end up with a see-through hole, this Teva model stands strong and barely touched.

We believe that the Grandview GTX Low deserves praise and the highest toebox durability score: 5 out of 5!

Teva Grandview GTX Low Toebox durability test
Test results
Grandview GTX Low 5
Average 3.7
Compared to 9 hiking shoes
1
Toebox durability
5
Number of shoes

Heel padding durability

Unfortunately, we cannot say the same about the shoe's heel lining. Made of a pretty basic synthetic mesh, it lost a 4-second duel with our Dremel.

On a scale from 1 to 5, where 1 is the least durable, we rated the shoe's heel padding as 2. This is a bit concerning given the shoe's price.

Teva Grandview GTX Low Heel padding durability
Test results
Grandview GTX Low 2
Average 3.5
Compared to 8 hiking shoes
1
Heel padding durability
5
Number of shoes

Outsole hardness

Seeing "Vibram" on the shoe's rubber set our expectations high for the outsole from the start. However, we were soon to be brought back to earth.

The Vibram rubber on this Teva shoe did not stand out as particularly hard. Based on our durometer measurements, it comes in at 82.5 HC, a little below average. This is not critical but nothing to write home about either.

Teva Grandview GTX Low Outsole hardness
Test results
Grandview GTX Low 82.5 HC
Average 83.6 HC
We use an average of four tests. The photo shows one of those tests.
Compared to 15 hiking shoes
65.0 HC
Outsole hardness
89.1 HC
Number of shoes

Outsole durability

The Vibram failed to impress us once again in the Dremel test. But it did fine, much like other hiking shoes.

Having drilled one of the shoe's lugs for long 22 seconds at 10K RPM speed, we saw a pretty typical damage for this test.

Our tread gauge showed that the dent was 1.4 mm deep on the Grandview's outsole. Not so different from the average.

Teva Grandview GTX Low outsole durability test

Test results
Grandview GTX Low 1.4 mm
Average 1.0 mm
Compared to 8 hiking shoes
0.0 mm
Outsole wear
2.0 mm
Number of shoes

Outsole thickness

This Teva hiking shoe also comes with a standard outsole thickness. Our caliper showed 2.5 mm minus the lugs.

Teva Grandview GTX Low Outsole thickness
Test results
Grandview GTX Low 2.5 mm
Average 2.5 mm
Compared to 15 hiking shoes
1.9 mm
Outsole thickness
4.0 mm
Number of shoes

Weight

If you are considering the low-cut Grandview GTX in the hope of getting a lightweight hiker, you might be disappointed.

Of course, it is lighter than the Grandview Mid but at 15.6 oz (441g), it is nearly 2 ounces heavier than the average hiking shoe.

But it's not a complete disaster either! This Teva shoe weighs the same as the popular Merrell Moab 3 GTX.

Teva Grandview GTX Low Weight
Test results
Grandview GTX Low 15.56 oz (441g)
Average 13.37 oz (379g)
Compared to 15 hiking shoes
6.49 oz (184g)
Weight
17.14 oz (486g)
Number of shoes

Cushioning

Heel stack

The Teva Grandview GTX Low packs a good amount of cushioning and we never felt like it was lacking on our hike test.

Our caliper recorded a measurement of 33.6 mm in the heel which is nearly the same as the average heel stack. We can readily recommend this Teva shoe for up to a full day of hiking. 

Teva Grandview GTX Low Heel stack
Test results
Grandview GTX Low 33.0 mm
Average 30.4 mm
Compared to 15 hiking shoes
9.9 mm
Heel stack
37.7 mm
Number of shoes

Forefoot stack

Upfront in the forefoot, we got 23.0 mm on the caliper. This is also an optimal amount of cushioning for a day hiking shoe.

Neither too tall nor too low, but offering just enough ground feel.

Teva Grandview GTX Low Forefoot stack
Test results
Grandview GTX Low 23.0 mm
Average 20.1 mm
Compared to 15 hiking shoes
10.7 mm
Forefoot stack
25.5 mm
Number of shoes

Drop

Calculating the difference in stack heights resulted in a 10.6 mm heel-to-toe drop. This is very typical for a hiking shoe and we didn't feel any discomfort related to our foot mechanics on the trail.

Teva Grandview GTX Low Drop
Test results
Grandview GTX Low 10.0 mm
Average 10.3 mm
Compared to 15 hiking shoes
-0.8 mm
Drop
15.9 mm
Number of shoes

Midsole softness

Note: a low durometer measurement equals a soft material, whereas a high measurement means it's firm.

If we had to name only one reason to choose the Grandview GTX Low over other hiking shoes, it would be softer-than-average cushioning.

Stepping into the shoe for the first time, we couldn't believe that we were actually wearing a hiking shoe!

Back in the lab, we pressed a durometer against the shoe's midsole foam. The tool returned 15.3 HA which is a whopping 100% plusher than average!

Cushioning-wise, this Teva feels a lot like a running shoe.

Teva Grandview GTX Low Midsole softness
Test results
Grandview GTX Low 15.3 HA
Average 27.3 HA
We use an average of four tests. The photo shows one of those tests.
Compared to 15 hiking shoes
13.5 HA
Midsole softness (soft to firm)
39.0 HA
Number of shoes

Difference in midsole softness in cold

To our great surprise, the shoe's foam characteristics didn't change much in low temperatures!

After spending 20 minutes in the freezer, we repeated the durometer measurement and couldn't believe that the cushioning softness barely changed at all!

With a reading of 16.9 HA, it only got 10.7% firmer and was still softer than most hiking shoes at room temperature. 

Teva Grandview GTX Low Difference in midsole softness in cold
Test results
Grandview GTX Low 10.7%
Average 19.1%
Compared to 15 hiking shoes
0%
Difference in midsole softness in cold
100%
Number of shoes

Insole thickness

Teva certainly didn't skimp on underfoot cushioning. The Grandview GTX Low received a nice padded insole that is 7.4 mm thick! We found it notably cushier than average.

Teva Grandview GTX Low Insole thickness
Test results
Grandview GTX Low 7.4 mm
Average 5.6 mm
Compared to 14 hiking shoes
2.6 mm
Insole thickness
8.6 mm
Number of shoes

Stability

Lateral stability test

We didn't find any glaring stability issues in the Teva Grandview GTX Low. It felt amazingly planted and supportive even when the trail got rocky and wobbly.

Torsional rigidity

The shoe draws most of its steadiness from a stiff nylon shank embedded into its midsole.

It gives the Grandview a lot of torsional stiffness to prevent any unwanted foot movements or, God forbid, ankle rolls.

In a manual test where we twisted the shoe sideways, we couldn't help but grant it the highest possible stiffness score - 5 out of 5.

Test results
Grandview GTX Low 5
Average 3.3
Compared to 15 hiking shoes
1
Torsional rigidity
5
Number of shoes

Heel counter stiffness

We found another source of stability in the shoe's very secure heel hold.

Pushing and squeezing the Grandview GTX Low's heel counter, we found it to be on the stiffer side. Easocially for a low-cut shoe!

On a 1-5 scale, where 5 is the stiffest, we rated it as 4.

Test results
Grandview GTX Low 4
Average 3.7
Compared to 15 hiking shoes
1
Heel counter stiffness
5
Number of shoes

Midsole width in the forefoot

As far as low-top hiking shoes go, the Teva Grandview offered a really wide platform to land on.

In the widest part of the forefoot, we got 116.6 mm on our caliper which is significantly wider than average! Even the massive Hoka Anacapa Low GTX fell short of a couple of millimeters here.

Teva Grandview GTX Low Midsole width in the forefoot
Test results
Grandview GTX Low 116.6 mm
Average 110.0 mm
Compared to 15 hiking shoes
103.0 mm
Midsole width in the forefoot
116.6 mm
Number of shoes

Midsole width in the heel

This Teva shoe also stood out with its immensely wide heel area. In the widest part, it returned 93.0 mm. It proved to be wider than the average again and even 1.6 mm wider than the popular KEEN Targhee III Waterproof.

There is no such thing as feeling off-balance in the Teva Grandview GTX Low.

Teva Grandview GTX Low Midsole width in the heel
Test results
Grandview GTX Low 93.0 mm
Average 86.9 mm
Compared to 15 hiking shoes
64.2 mm
Midsole width in the heel
93.1 mm
Number of shoes

Flexibility

Stiffness

Despite its sturdy and even stiff build, the Teva Grandview turned out to be pliable enough in the forefoot. Bending our feet throughout the walk, we didn't feel like we had to fight with the shoe.

To provide some context, we measured how much force it takes to bend this Teva shoe to a 90-degree angle. Our force gauge showed 27.3N which is 30% less than it takes a hiking shoe on average.

It felt nice to have both stiffness and flexibility in the areas where each is most needed.

Test results
Grandview GTX Low 27.3N
Average 30.0N
We use an average of four tests. The video shows one of those tests.
Compared to 15 hiking shoes
1.8N
Stiffness
54.0N
Number of shoes

Difference in stiffness in cold

Even in the cold, the Teva Grandview GTX Low managed to retain its flexibility!

Most hiking shoes get about 40-50% stiffer after sitting in the freezer for 20 minutes. But not the Grandview! The shoe barely changed, stiffening up by a mere 9.3%!

Teva Grandview GTX Low Difference in stiffness in cold
Test results
Grandview GTX Low 9.3%
Average 37.5%
Compared to 15 hiking shoes
0%
Difference in stiffness in cold
100%
Number of shoes

Grip / Traction

Lug depth

According to our caliper measurements, the lugs are exactly 4.0 mm deep on the Grandview GTX Low.

Teva Grandview GTX Low Lug depth

In addition, these lugs have a triangular multi-directional shape which offered a very hard bite on unfriendly terrain. From wet rocks around the river to muddy stretches under the rain, this Teva helped us feel surefooted.

Teva Grandview GTX Low outsole

Test results
Grandview GTX Low 4.0 mm
Average 4.0 mm
Compared to 15 hiking shoes
2.1 mm
Lug depth
5.0 mm
Number of shoes

Size and fit

Toebox width at the widest part

In a crowd of hiking shoes from different brands, Teva must be the easiest to spot. Priding itself in extra spacious toeboxes, this is the go-to brand for hikers with wide feet.

We measured the Grandview Low's toebox in two areas to show you exactly how roomy we're talking.

In the widest part of the forefoot, our caliper showed 103.8 mm which is only a few millimeters wider than average.

Teva Grandview GTX Low Toebox width at the widest part
Test results
Grandview GTX Low 103.8 mm
Average 100.6 mm
Compared to 15 hiking shoes
95.4 mm
Toebox width at the widest part
107.7 mm
Number of shoes

Toebox width at the big toe

But when it comes to the tip of the toebox, that's where it makes all the difference.

At the big toe mark, the Grandview shows a truly impressive width of 87.0 mm! About a centimeter wider than average! The only other hiking shoe in our catalog that has similar parameters is the KEEN NXIS Speed.

On the downside, people with narrow or even medium-width feet may lack a secure foothold inside this Teva shoe. Actually, if we were wearing thinner socks, we would probably experience some heel slippage too!

If this sounds concerning to you and you prefer a more close-fitting shoe, the Salomon X Ultra 4 GTX will provide a better experience.

Teva Grandview GTX Low Toebox width at the big toe
Test results
Grandview GTX Low 87.0 mm
Average 81.6 mm
Compared to 15 hiking shoes
68.8 mm
Toebox width at the big toe
108.6 mm
Number of shoes

Tongue: gusset type

As befits a waterproof hiking shoe, the Teva Grandview GTX Low features a semi-gusseted tongue.

We found that it nails its job of protecting the interiors from water. And in addition, it also prevents any unwanted tongue shifting and holds the foot more securely in place than a non-attached tongue.

Teva Grandview GTX Low Tongue: gusset type
Test results
Grandview GTX Low Both sides (semi)

Heel lock

To tell the truth, we found this Teva shoe's heel lock system a bit fiddly. It's not very practical and tends to fall off the lace when we are trying to lace up the shoe. This is especially annoying when you have to adjust the laces quickly in an outdoor setting.

Teva Grandview GTX Low Heel lock

Comfort

Tongue padding

The tongue of this Teva shoe is lightly yet sufficiently padded. Our caliper shows a thinner-than-average thickness of 5.9 mm.

But we never experienced lace bites here!

Teva Grandview GTX Low Tongue padding
Test results
Grandview GTX Low 5.9 mm
Average 9.6 mm
Compared to 15 hiking shoes
5.0 mm
Tongue padding
17.0 mm
Number of shoes

Heel tab

The shoe features two finger loops, one on the tongue and one on the heel collar. Both are very handy to hold onto when sliding inside the Grandview GTX Low.

Teva Grandview GTX Low hiking
Test results
Grandview GTX Low Finger loop

Removable insole

You can always remove the shoe's stock insole and replace it with a custom insert. But do take into account this shoe's roomier-than-average toebox.

Teva Grandview GTX Low Removable insole
Test results
Grandview GTX Low Yes

Misc

Reflective elements

There are no reflective elements to be found on the Teva Grandview GTX Low.

Teva Grandview GTX Low Reflective elements
Test results
Grandview GTX Low No