Brooks Trace review

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Upper/Heel/Laces of the Trace

The Brooks Trace has an accommodating upper with lots of flex to form to your foot. It’s breathable with almost no welded overlays. 

The tongue and ankle collar, meanwhile, are nicely padded. There’s medium stiffness in the heel counter and no heel slip even without any special lacing. 

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Midsole/Outsole/Weight

The Trace is engineered with the BioMoGo DNA midsole with a full-length rubber outsole, which provides a decent grip. At 9.2 oz, which is not insanely light but respectable, it feels light and nimble on the foot. 

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I like gusseted tongue better

The seam at the bottom of the laces bothered me. It’s tighter there across the top of my foot and I keep noticing it. 

There are no gussets in the tongue. This is a feature I really like so I was sad not to see it on this shoe. 

I want a little more bounce

Unfortunately, I’m just not a fan of Brooks’ DNA LOFT. Don’t get me wrong, it’s not bad, there’s no problem here. It rides fine, it’s just that I find myself wanting it to be more exciting. I want a little more bounce out of it. 

Given how comfortable the lineup is and its cool designs, I wish I loved the ride. But in my opinion, it’s just okay. 

Brooks Trace heel drop 

At 12mm drop, they could be flattened a bit for my liking. 

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A very affordable price

It retails for $100, and yes, I love the price! 

Facts / Specs

Terrain: Road
Weight: Men 261g / Women 224g
Drop: 12mm
Arch support: Neutral
Forefoot height: 12mm
Heel height: 24mm
Collection: Brooks BioMoGo

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Author
Paul Ronto
Paul Ronto

Over the past 20 years, Paul has climbed, hiked, and ran all over the world. He has summited peaks throughout the Americas, trekked through Africa, and tested his endurance in 24-hour trail races as well as 6 marathons. On average, he runs 30-50 miles a week in the foothills of Northern Colorado. His research is regularly cited in The New York Times, Washington Post, National Geographic, etc. On top of this, Paul is leading the running shoe lab where he cuts shoes apart and analyses every detail of the shoes that you might buy.