Asics GT 2000 10 review and lab test

I don’t get too excited when a classic Asics shoe arrives on my doorstep, they all look the same, they all feel the same, and it’s just not my style. 

 

But, I have been insanely impressed with what Asics has done in the past two years, so I figured I’d give the GT 2000 10 an honest appraisal before I wrote it off. 

Asics GT 2000 10 Pieces.jpg

I’m impressed with the updates honestly. Asics moving away from their vintage plastic post system in their stability shoes is a great move. I was actually impressed with the Kayano 28 (that’s a monumental feat since I don’t care for the Kayano) and I’ve been impressed with their Lite series (Kayano and Nimbus). 

I also like the new midsole material, it’s a bit more bouncy and responsive, and the shoe feels like it has more dampening underfoot as you land. All positives. 

There are of course some downsides, but they don’t relate to the updates, just my opinion of classic Asics shoes, read on to see what those are. 

Who should buy the Asics GT 2000 10

The GT 2000 10 is ideal for runners on a budget or newer runners who need some arch or stability support. The shoe is comfortable, responsive, and won’t take any time to break in or get used to. 

It’s a classic, do-it-all type of training shoe that can fit a lot of different needs for a wide variety of runners. 

Who should not buy it 

Not everyone needs this shoe though. It’s pretty specific actually and there are other shoes out there to fill different needs. 

 

Don’t buy this shoe if:

Good lockdown but feels a touch long 

The GT 2000 10 feels a touch long on my foot. I may consider going a half size down if I were keeping this shoe in my rotation. 

The wide toe box and stretchy mesh upper feel amazing, they let my toes move a ton, but it’s almost too roomy up front and feels a touch sloppy on runs. 

There is good lockdown over the top however and the heel surprisingly doesn’t have any slip for me, which is unique on a classically styled Asics. The stiff heel counter and ample ankle padding usually don’t work for me, but my foot stayed put from the midfoot back. 

One thing Asics could do would be to gusset the tongue, all shoes need gussets in 2022, take note manufacturers! 

Classic Asics comfort in the GT 2000 10

Asics tend to be super comfortable, especially without a plastic post digging into your arch. This shoe has a super wide toe box which comfort-wise I love. 

The padded ankle and tongue are plush as hell as well. The tongue is 12.8mm thick! Average shoes are just 5.5mm thick in the tongue, and the ankle collar follows suit with what I would normally call “too much padding.” But it feels nice, I can’t lie.

Asics GT 2000 10 Cut.jpg

The dual-density foam design and LiteTruss system is a way better design than the old plastic Trusstic post system that Asics used in past iterations, giving this shoe a bit more flex underfoot and a softer landing.

Asics GT 2000 10 Midsole.jpg

And of course, it had the classic Gel heel that Asics is well known for, so plenty of padding for heel strikers that need plushness as they trot down the road. 

Asics GT 2000 10 Heel.jpg

Smooth and consistent ride

Thanks to the upgrade to FlyteFoam Propel in this dual foam construction, the shoe feels softer and more responsive underfoot than past iterations. 

 

It’s not super peppy, or overly mushy. It just falls in the middle. The shoe works, nothing fancy here, and if you need light stability it’s not a bad choice. 

But it’s a forgotten middle child I think. Neutral runners can snag the Nimbus or Nimbus Lite and stability runners can choose the Kayano or Kayano Lite. Both the “Lite” versions mentioned are better than this shoe in every regard in my opinion which puts the GT 2000 10 just out of my buying preference. 

It is lighter feeling and more responsive than most stability trainers, and can be used for daily runs, recovery days, some speed work (if needed), and I am sure you’ll see plenty of shoes like this out on race day too. It can kinda do it all in a Jack-of-all-trades, master-of-none style. 

I like that Asics didn’t ramp up the drop on these shoes. At 7.5mm (24mm in the forefoot and 31.5mm in the heel) it’s ideal for most runners and hard to be annoyed by if you like flatter shoes as it’s difficult to notice. 

In the end, it’s a no-fuss, smooth and stable ride. 

Open the GT 2000 10 box and go

No break-in period needed, or learning curve. This shoe feels and runs like the shoes you’ve had for decades albeit with a bit softer landing. 

Asics GT 2000 10 Freezer.jpg

Unbox and go thanks to its soft flexing design. At 22.1N the shoe is below average (37N) for stiffness. Just beware that in cold temps the softer foams do stiffen up considerably. This shoe measured 34.5N in cold temps, an increase of 56.1% in overall stiffness.  

Light for a stability shoe 

At 9.9 ounces (281g) it’s a decent weight for a stability shoe. But in the grand scheme of things, nearly 10 ounces is no featherweight. 

Asics GT 2000 10 Weight.jpg

Respectable for its category, but there are lighter shoes out there. 

Grip and durability

The GT 2000 10 has a pretty standard Asics outsole, which is a good thing. The AHAR compound is long-lasting with more dense rubber placed strategically to ensure long wear in the right places and plenty of flex in other areas. 

Asics GT 2000 10 Outsole.jpg

Grip is solid as well. I have yet to feel like these outsoles from Asics wear down prematurely or struggle on road runs in any condition. 

Asics GT 2000 10 runs hot

The mesh upper is breathable, but mostly just in the toe box. There’s a lot of layers of fabric in this shoe, and a ton of foam padding all around. 

Asics GT 2000 10 Upper.jpg

It makes for a plush feeling shoe, but a warm one. Runs a bit hot in my opinion. 

Asics GT 2000 10 Logo.jpg

Price is decent

At $130, the GT 2000 10 is cheaper than the Kayano and Kayano Lite and may be a good option to save a few bucks compared to the Kayano. 

Asics GT 2000 10 Pieces (2).jpg

Personally, I think the Kayano Lite is a bit snazzier and more fun to run in than either of the classic gel-totting stability shoes, but I like shoes from the future not the past! 

Night running is kinda a go

Asics did a decent job on the heel of this shoe with some highly reflective elements, but the sides of the shoe lack any visibility in the dark. Be careful. 

Asics GT 2000 10 Reflective.jpg

Asics GT 2000 10 Reflective (2).jpg

Conclusion 

If you’re looking for a decent daily trainer that has some nice updates the GT 2000 10 may fit the bill. 

Asics GT 2000 10 Single.jpg

For those that need a bit of stability control without anything too fancy or distracting check out this trainer. 

Complete lab-specs overview 

  GT 2000 10 Average
Whole shoe
Weight (g) 281 264
Drop (mm) 7.5 8.3
Flexibility of the shoe (N) 22.1
37.0
Flexibility of the shoe (Freezer 20 min) (N) 34.5 48.2
Flexibility of the shoe (% of change) 56.1 37.2
Lace slip test with the knot (N) 15.6 23.1
Longitudinal flexibility (1-5 scale, 5 being the stiffest) 3 3.2
Torsional flexibility (1-5 scale, 5 being the stiffest) 3 3.3
Upper
Thickness - Tongue (mm) 12.8 5.5
Width Upper - Forefoot (mm) 99.7 98.6
Width Upper - Heel (mm) 80.5 75.9
Lace Stretch (1-5 scale, 5 being the most stretchy) 4 2.9
Flexibility of the heel counter (1-5 scale, 5 being the stiffest) 4 3.2
Tongue: gusset type None -
Heel: pull tab No -
Midsole
Width Midsole - Forefoot (mm) 111.7 112.6
Width Midsole - Heel (mm) 92.3 89.6
Stack - Forefoot with insole (mm) 24.0 24.6
Stack - Heel with insole (mm) 31.5 32.7
Durometer Midsole Heel (Room temperature) (HA) 27.0 21.9
Outsole
Outsole thickness (Heel) (mm) 3.5 3.5
Lugs Depth (mm) N/A 3.3
Durometer Outsole Heel (Room temperature) (HC) 85.5 80.2
Insole
Insole Heel Thickness (mm) 5.3 4.3
Insole: removable Yes  

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Author
Paul Ronto
Paul Ronto

Over the past 20 years, Paul has climbed, hiked, and ran all over the world. He has summited peaks throughout the Americas, trekked through Africa, and tested his endurance in 24-hour trail races as well as 6 marathons. On average, he runs 30-50 miles a week in the foothills of Northern Colorado. His research is regularly cited in The New York Times, Washington Post, National Geographic, etc. On top of this, Paul is leading the running shoe lab where he cuts shoes apart and analyses every detail of the shoes that you might buy.