Our verdict

The Wilson Rush Pro 4.0 is not a shoe for narrow feet or players who prefer a very snug, one-to-one fit on their tennis shoes. With that off the table, we can recommend this moderately priced Wilson model to athletes who want a very stable and durable shoe that doesn't feel heavy on the foot. We also promise that its plush cushioning is going to feel very different from a typical tennis shoe these days.

Pros

  • Amazingly soft cushioning
  • Excellent impact protection
  • High level of lateral stability
  • Impressive upper and outsole durability
  • Good grip-and-give balance
  • Very flexible for a tennis shoe
  • Accommodating fit
  • Doesn't drag the foot down

Cons

  • Awfully warm upper
  • Outsole feels too grippy at first
  • Webbed eyelets affect the lockdown
  • Not for narrow feet

Audience verdict

78
Good!

Who should buy

We can confidently recommend the Wilson Rush Pro 4.0 to tennis players who want:

  • a well-rounded shoe that is cushioned, stable, and not heavy
  • a stable shoe that's not too firm or rigid
  • a highly durable tennis shoe at a moderate price

Wilson Rush Pro 4.0 review

Who should NOT buy

The shoe's lack of breathability and webbed eyelets can be a deal-breaker for many tennis players.

As an alternative, we recommend looking into the K-Swiss Hypercourt Supreme. It is lighter, more breathable, and has a conventional (reliable!) lacing system with a great lockdown.

Another option is the Nike GP Challenge Pro which is heavier but has a more one-to-one fit and a wider, steadier platform.

Wilson Rush Pro 4.0 lab test

Breathability

This shoe from Wilson is impossibly stuffy! We think that everyone who plays tennis in warm weather should avoid the Rush Pro 4.0.

What the brand calls "minimally layered upper" couldn't be further from the truth.

We always double-check our own experience in the lab to stay as objective as possible. But even in our smoke-pumping machine test, the shoe's upper refused to let the smoke out! As you can see from the video, there is just a tiny streak coming out of the eyelet area.

Even when it's put against the light, this material fails to show any ventilation holes.

Wilson Rush Pro 4.0 microscope

We went further by investigating the fabric through our microscope. But it only confirmed our previous findings - it is a hella warm shoe.

Wilson Rush Pro 4.0 microscope upper

On a 1-5 scale, where 5 is the most breathable, we gave the Wilson Rush Pro 4.0 the lowest score of 1.

Test results
Rush Pro 4.0 1
Average 3.1
Compared to 25 all court tennis shoes
Number of shoes
1
Breathability
5

Durability

Toebox durability

On the bright side, the lack of breathability is very well compensated for by the shoe's impressively durable upper.

Wilson Rush Pro 4.0 toe drag guard

The Rush Pro 4.0 has a substantial toe drag guard on the medial side as well as an enlarged toe bumper and rubberized overlays on the high-wear areas. But apart from that, the shoe's mesh is incredibly wear-resistant by itself!

To test its durability, we applied a Dremel with a sandpaper tip to the fabric for 12 seconds. The speed (5K RPM) and pressure (3.2N) remained consistent for comparable results.

Wilson Rush Pro 4.0 Toebox durability test

As you can see, the tool didn't even get through the topmost layer of the mesh! This further convinced us that the Wilson Rush Pro 4.0 can be recommended to aggressive toe draggers out there.

On a 1-5 durability scale, we can readily give the shoe the highest score of 5!

Test results
Rush Pro 4.0 5
Average 4.1
Compared to 23 all court tennis shoes
Number of shoes
1
Toebox durability
5

Heel padding durability

Another sensitive area of every tennis shoe is the interior heel padding. Non-stop multi-directional movements of the game create a lot of friction in this part of the shoe, causing it to tear before any other part.

Of course, we are back here with a Dremel to test that out.

We applied the tool's tip to the fabric for only 4 seconds (because the material is THAT delicate) at the speed of 5K RPM.

As the photo below shows, the Rush Pro 4.0 didn't do so well here. Looking at the large tear in the lining, we had to rate the shoe's heel padding durability with the lowest score of 1.

Wilson Rush Pro 4.0 Heel padding durability test
Test results
Rush Pro 4.0 1
Average 3.3
Compared to 23 all court tennis shoes
Number of shoes
1
Heel padding durability
5

Outsole hardness

Even though the Wilson Rush Pro 4.0 is a moderately-priced tennis shoe, it doesn't skimp on the outsole rubber.

The first thing we noticed was how hard its Duralast rubber compound was. Based on our durometer measurement, its hardness comes in at 87 HC which is on par with the more expensive models.

Wilson Rush Pro 4.0 Outsole hardness
Test results
Rush Pro 4.0 87.0 HC
Average 85.8 HC
We use an average of four tests. The photo shows one of those tests.
Compared to 25 all court tennis shoes
Number of shoes
73.4 HC
Outsole hardness
92.0 HC

Outsole durability

But the only test that can convince us of a shoe's outsole durability is of course the Dremel test.

For the outsole, we set the Dremel speed higher (10K RPM) and hold it against the rubber for longer (22 seconds).

We were truly impressed that the Rush Pro's outsole only wore off by 0.72 mm! This is shallower than we expected and is a promising sign of long-term durability.

Wilson Rush Pro 4.0 Outsole durability test
Test results
Rush Pro 4.0 0.7 mm
Average 0.7 mm
Compared to 23 all court tennis shoes
Number of shoes
0.0 mm
Outsole wear
2.0 mm

Outsole thickness

We also measured the shoe's outsole thickness at 4.1 mm which is the same as the average of tennis shoes.

For added reassurance, Wilson also offers a 6-month outsole guarantee for the Rush Pro 4.0. That means you can get a replacement in case the outsole on your pair blows sooner than 6 months.

Wilson Rush Pro 4.0 Outsole thickness
Test results
Rush Pro 4.0 4.1 mm
Average 4.1 mm
Compared to 25 all court tennis shoes
Number of shoes
3.0 mm
Outsole thickness
5.1 mm

Weight

Playtesting the Rush Pro 4.0, we couldn't put our finger on its weight category. It is not really a heavy shoe but not a light one either.

Wilson Rush Pro 4.0 weight

Weighing the Wilson Rush Pro 4.0 in a men's US size 9, our scale showed 13.0 oz (367g). This is right in the middle of tennis shoes but on foot, the shoe feels quite light.

Wilson Rush Pro 4.0 Weight
Test results
Rush Pro 4.0 12.95 oz (367g)
Average 12.84 oz (364g)
Compared to 25 all court tennis shoes
Number of shoes
10.30 oz (292g)
Weight
14.71 oz (417g)

Cushioning

Heel stack

In terms of cushioning, the Rush Pro 4.0 feels very well-balanced. It is not too high off the court but not too grounded either. We have no complaints about the impact protection of this shoe.

Measuring its stack height in the heel, our calliper showed 29.1 mm. That's the average heel height across tennis shoes.

Wilson Rush Pro 4.0 Heel stack
Test results
Rush Pro 4.0 29.1 mm
Average 29.3 mm
Compared to 25 all court tennis shoes
Number of shoes
25.3 mm
Heel stack
33.0 mm

Forefoot stack

In the shoe's forefoot, our calliper returned 20.0 mm which is also the same as the average.

We felt enough support under the balls of our feet for split steps, quick sprints to the net, and explosive takes-offs.

Wilson Rush Pro 4.0 Forefoot stack
Test results
Rush Pro 4.0 20.0 mm
Average 19.7 mm
Compared to 25 all court tennis shoes
Number of shoes
17.0 mm
Forefoot stack
23.4 mm

Drop

We applaud Wilson's precision when it comes to the heel-to-toe drop!

In the official specs, the brand states that the Rush Pro 4.0 has a 9-mm drop. Our own measurements confirm this showing a 9.1-mm offset.

Wilson Rush Pro 4.0 Drop

It also happens to be the average heel-to-toe difference across tennis shoes. This setup is most optimal with just enough heel elevation to provide comfort and take the pressure off the Achilles without compromising stability.

Test results
Rush Pro 4.0 9.1 mm
Average 9.7 mm
Compared to 25 all court tennis shoes
Number of shoes
6.3 mm
Drop
12.4 mm

Midsole softness

Note: a low durometer measurement equals a soft material, whereas a high measurement means it's firm.

Stepping into the Wilson Rush Pro 4.0, we were amazed at the plushness that greeted our feet inside.

It is not common for tennis shoes to have soft cushioning these days. But Wilson found a way to mix it in without compromising the shoe's stability.

It is by far one of the softest tennis shoe midsoles we've tested in our lab!

Measuring the R-DST+ foam in the heel, our durometer returned 22.1 HA. That's a whopping 35% softer than average! We absolutely loved the shock absorption it provided on hard landings.

Wilson Rush Pro 4.0 Midsole softness
Test results
Rush Pro 4.0 22.1 HA
Average 29.2 HA
We use an average of four tests. The photo shows one of those tests.
Compared to 25 all court tennis shoes
Number of shoes
21.5 HA
Midsole softness (soft to firm)
34.0 HA

Secondary foam softness

Note: a low durometer measurement equals a soft material, whereas a high measurement means it's firm.

For the forefoot cushioning, the Wilson Rush Pro 4.0 uses a lighter and even softer EVA foam.

Pressing our durometer against it, we got 21.0 HA which is 5% softer than the heel cushioning. We thoroughly enjoyed the bounce it provided when we stayed on our toes or pushed off the balls of our feet with maximum force.

The only drawback of such soft foam is that it tends to bottom out faster compared to other cushioning foams.

Wilson Rush Pro 4.0 Secondary foam softness
Test results
Rush Pro 4.0 21.0 HA
Average 25.5 HA
We use an average of four tests. The photo shows one of those tests.

Insole thickness

The cushioning of the Rush Pro 4.0 is elevated by the well-padded OrthoLite insole. It is a bit thinner than average at 4.1 mm but its moulded shape feels beautifully ergonomic underfoot.

Wilson Rush Pro 4.0 Insole thickness
Test results
Rush Pro 4.0 4.1 mm
Average 5.3 mm
Compared to 25 all court tennis shoes
Number of shoes
3.9 mm
Insole thickness
8.5 mm

Stability

Lateral stability test

The Wilson Rush Pro 4.0 looks like it's been meticulously engineered and packed with technologies and stabilising features.

And on foot... it feels exactly like that.

This tennis shoe has a good amount of stability to prevent ankle rolls very well. But we must warn you that it doesn't feel as secure as the flagship stability shoes out there - the ASICS Gel Resolution 9 or the Adidas Barricade 13.

Torsional rigidity

The mainstay of the shoe's stability is the 4D Support Chassis 2.0 which comprises two parts:

  • one piece is placed on the sides for lateral stability
  • the other runs underfoot for added propulsion on take-offs (think of a springboard at the pool)

Wilson Rush Pro 4.0 lateral support

Together these pieces add plenty of torsional rigidity to the Rush Pro 4.0. Stiffness makes this tennis shoe immune to awkward foot and ankle rolls on forceful multi-directional movements.

Wilson Rush Pro 4.0 chassis

In our manual test, we rated the shoe's torsional rigidity with the highest score of 5.

Test results
Rush Pro 4.0 4
Average 4.2
Compared to 25 all court tennis shoes
Number of shoes
1
Torsional rigidity
5

Heel counter stiffness

As part of the shoe's stabilising hassis, the Rush Pro 4.0 features a substantial heel counter.

We rated its stiffness with the highest possible score of 5 in our manual push-squeeze test. There is absolutely no give to the back of the shoe which kept our heels securely in place even during the most intense footwork.

Test results
Rush Pro 4.0 5
Average 3.9
Compared to 25 all court tennis shoes
Number of shoes
1
Heel counter stiffness
5

Midsole width in the forefoot

However, the platform of the Wilson Rush Pro 4.0 doesn't seem to be very wide. In fact, it is a bit narrower than average.

Measuring the widest part of the shoe's midsole in the forefoot, our calliper showed 110.1 mm. This is just enough width to create an outrigger which helps to stay steady and bounce back from lateral cuts.

Wilson Rush Pro 4.0 Midsole width in the forefoot
Test results
Rush Pro 4.0 110.1 mm
Average 111.7 mm
Compared to 25 all court tennis shoes
Number of shoes
105.3 mm
Midsole width in the forefoot
117.4 mm

Midsole width in the heel

In the widest part of the shoe's heel, our calliper showed 86.7 mm. Again, a couple of millimetres narrower than average but just enough to keep our feet stable.

Wilson Rush Pro 4.0 Midsole width in the heel
Test results
Rush Pro 4.0 86.7 mm
Average 89.7 mm
Compared to 25 all court tennis shoes
Number of shoes
82.4 mm
Midsole width in the heel
99.7 mm

Flexibility

Stiffness

Even though the Rush Pro 4.0 comes with a stiff shank in the midfoot, it doesn't seem to affect its flexibility at all!

Wilson Rush Pro 4.0 flexibility

We were able to bend our feet most naturally in this Wilson tennis shoe. Perhaps this is also thanks to its softer midsole foam? Anyway, this is what makes this tennis shoe feel so different from the rest of the market.

To measure exactly how pliable the Rush Pro 4.0 is, we used a force gauge to bend the shoe to a 90-degree angle.

The tool showed that this Wilson shoe requires as little as 23.9N to do that! This is 30% more flexible than the average tennis shoe.

Test results
Rush Pro 4.0 23.9N
Average 30.1N
We use an average of four tests. The video shows one of those tests.
Compared to 25 all court tennis shoes
Number of shoes
20.6N
Stiffness
44.9N

Grip / Traction

Expect the Wilson Rush Pro 4.0 to feel a bit tacky during the first few sessions. Its lug pattern needs a little breaking in before it allows you to slide out of shots easily.

Wilson Rush Pro 4.0 outsole

Once we were past the initial stage, the shoe offered a nice balance of grip and give.

Size and fit

Toebox width at the widest part

The Wilson Rush Pro 4.0 treated us to an accommodating fit straight from the box. Unlike many tennis shoes we've tested, this one required zero breaking-in.

Wilson Rush Pro 4.0 fit

We found this surprising because our calliper measurements of the shoe's toebox weren't different from the average. In the widest part of the forefoot, the tool showed 101.9 mm which is standard for a tennis shoe in a men's US 9.

Perhaps this is because the Rush Pro 4.0 doesn't have the same thick and sturdy upper overlays as other tennis shoes do.

Wilson Rush Pro 4.0 Toebox width at the widest part
Test results
Rush Pro 4.0 101.9 mm
Average 101.2 mm
Compared to 25 all court tennis shoes
Number of shoes
98.2 mm
Toebox width at the widest part
105.0 mm

Toebox width at the big toe

This Wilson shoe also has a standard amount of space near the tip of the toebox. Measuring it where the big toe ends, our calliper showed 76.8 mm.

Wilson Rush Pro 4.0 Toebox width at the big toe
Test results
Rush Pro 4.0 76.8 mm
Average 76.8 mm
Compared to 25 all court tennis shoes
Number of shoes
74.8 mm
Toebox width at the big toe
79.8 mm

Tongue: gusset type

We were happy to discover that the Rush Pro 4.0 comes with a fully gusseted tongue. The brand itself calls it Endofit, or a full inner sock.

This setup really contributed to the lockdown as the shoe's lacing system turned out to be somewhat lacklustre.

Wilson Rush Pro 4.0 Tongue: gusset type
Test results
Rush Pro 4.0 Both sides (full)

Lockdown

We firmly believe that Wilson should've gone for the standard eyelet system in the Rush Pro 4.0.

Not only are these thin webbed eyelets more prone to tearing, but they also mess with the shoe's fit. We can see how people with narrower feet (or those who prefer a very tight fit in their tennis shoes) would want to crank down the laces a lot in this model.

Wilson Rush Pro 4.0 laces

This will result in more pressure around the midfoot and quicker deterioration of the eyelets and laces.

Comfort

Tongue padding

But if you need to cinch up the laces real tight, you would want a well-padded tongue, right?

Unfortunately, the Rush Pro 4.0 doesn't have much to offer. Measuring the shoe's tongue thickness at 5.7 mm, we found it to be thinner than average.

Wilson Rush Pro 4.0 Tongue padding
Test results
Rush Pro 4.0 5.7 mm
Average 7.8 mm
Compared to 25 all court tennis shoes
Number of shoes
2.5 mm
Tongue padding
13.1 mm

Heel tab

In the absence of a pull tab, you will need both hands to get your foot inside the Wilson Rush Pro's inner sleeve. And if you don't want to ruin the shoe's heel padding too soon (it is quite fragile in this shoe), we recommend using a shoehorn.

Wilson Rush Pro 4.0 Heel tab
Test results
Rush Pro 4.0 None

Removable insole

You have the option to swap the shoe's stock insole with your own custom orthotics. But we don't see the need to do so given the high quality of this molded OrthoLite insert. 

Wilson Rush Pro 4.0 Removable insole
Test results
Rush Pro 4.0 Yes