Our verdict

Nike's updates can be unpredictable, but we can confidently say that the Pegasus 41 is a standout. We were particularly impressed by its features for heel strikers, enhanced by the new plush foam and rockered sole. The shoe maintains its renowned durability too. And despite the £10 price increase, we believe it's justified and well worth it. At the end of the day, although it's been quite some time since 1982—I wasn't even born then!—the Pegasus series is still kicking, and for good reason.

Pros

  • Enhanced for heel strikers
  • New ReactX foam!
  • Improved breathability
  • Plush upper
  • Good durability
  • Several stability enhancements
  • Newly designed rocker and bevel
  • Solid performance
  • Superior lockdown
  • Sustainable features

Cons

  • Not ideal for forefoot strikers
  • Price increased by $10
  • Worse than the v40 in cold temperatures

Audience verdict

91
Superb!

Who should buy

We've thoroughly tested the Pegasus 41 to its limits and are convinced it's a fantastic choice for:

  • Beginners to running seeking a reliable and versatile daily trainer for short, medium and even long runs.
  • Loyal Pegasus aficionados who upgrade annually, as they will find this version to be an exceptional update.
  • Runners who found the previous React midsole lacking in energy return, as they will appreciate the enhanced performance of the new ReactX foam.
  • Heel strikers in search of an affordable, durable, and reliable daily training shoe.

Nike Pegasus 41

Who should NOT buy

We've put the Pegasus 41 through rigorous tests and, based on our findings, we think it's not the best option for certain runners.

Specifically, the shoe's cushioning and high heel-to-toe drop make it less suitable for forefoot strikers who may find the design uncomfortable for their running style. For those runners, we recommend considering alternatives like the Saucony Ride 17 or the Hoka Clifton 9, which provide more cushioning in the forefoot.

Additionally, we believe the Pegasus 41 may disappoint those who prefer a lightweight running experience. The shoe's weight might feel cumbersome, particularly for runners accustomed to featherweight models.

Nike Pegasus 41 parts

We found in the lab that competitors like the ASICS Novablast 4 or the New Balance FuelCell Rebel v4 present a lighter design with similar pricing. These models are engineered for a lightweight experience—albeit with less durability—which we believe makes them better choices for runners seeking comfort without the bulk.

Breathability

One of the aspects we were less fond of with the Pegasus 40 was its tendency to run a bit warm due to its dense upper. However, when we first unboxed this update, it was clear that Nike had addressed this issue. The ventilation holes are now prominently featured throughout the toebox, a promising initial sign, yet we still needed to confirm their effectiveness here in the lab.

We began our testing with the smoke-pumping machine. There, we discovered a clear improvement; with a score of 4/5, this is a 1-point upgrade from the v40 (3/5).

Using a light, we also examined how Nike has refined the shoe’s ventilation structure. We found that they went all-in for breathability in the toebox while reinforcing the structure in other areas of the shoe—like the midfoot, heel, and even the toecap. This should improve stability and durability.

Nike Pegasus 41 toebox microscope

Our focus then shifted to the toebox, the main contributor to the excellent ventilation. To get a closer look at those tiny holes, we turned on the microscope.

Nike Pegasus 41 microscope mesh

Under magnification, we could see the engineered mesh featuring numerous holes that facilitate the escape of hot air and moisture. While there's a black layer beneath these holes, it's thin enough to ensure it doesn’t significantly hinder airflow too much.

Certainly, without that underlying layer, the shoe might have scored a perfect 5/5 for ventilation in our evaluations. However, removing it would compromise comfort and durability—trade-offs we’re not willing to make in a daily trainer.

Test results
Pegasus 41 4
Average 3.8
Compared to 235 running shoes
Number of shoes
1
Breathability
5

Durability

Toebox durability

After confirming its optimal breathability, it's now time to evaluate whether the engineered mesh upper also provides at least average durability. We were initially uncertain if the mesh would hold up due to its numerous ventilation holes.

Indeed, we found that it does. While the white mesh disappeared—as we anticipated—the secondary black layer remained intact, earning a 3/5 in our evaluation. This is reassuring, as most runners expect their Pegasus to endure not just for running, but also for multiple activities after their running days are over.

Nike Pegasus 41 Toebox durability
Test results
Pegasus 41 3
Average 2.4
Compared to 169 running shoes
Number of shoes
1
Toebox durability
5

Heel padding durability

Another common area of concern for many runners in terms of durability is the Achilles padding, which can sometimes degrade after just a few runs.

However, we think this won't be a problem with the Pegasus 41. Scoring a 4/5 in our second Dremel test, it's highly unlikely to see early damage in this area.

Nike Pegasus 41 Heel padding durability
Test results
Pegasus 41 4
Average 3.2
Compared to 165 running shoes
Number of shoes
1
Heel padding durability
5

Outsole hardness

Turning our attention to the iconic waffle outsole—a design still thriving since Bill Bowerman's 1974 patent—we began by assessing the hardness of the blown rubber compound.

Nike Pegasus 41 outsole

The outsole includes multiple holes in the forefoot and a large longitudinal groove, both of which are excellent for enhancing flexibility and water drainage.

With a hardness of 89.0 HC, Nike clearly took no risks here. Although not excellent, the traction is sufficient, suggesting that the harder rubber should also provide good durability, which is what we anticipate. Now, let's put it to the test!

Nike Pegasus 41 Outsole hardness
Test results
Pegasus 41 89.0 HC
Average 80.5 HC
We use an average of four tests. The photo shows one of those tests.
Compared to 286 running shoes
Number of shoes
52.1 HC
Outsole hardness
93.0 HC

Outsole durability

In our third and final Dremel test, we increased the tool's revolutions up to 10,000 to truly challenge the rubber.

What we found left us moderately satisfied. To be honest, given the rubber's hardness, we had hoped for slightly better durability. However, the presence of a 0.9-mm dent confirms that it should still offer a decent lifespan, even when used on a mix of asphalt, easy trails, or gravel roads.

Nike Pegasus 41 Outsole durability
Test results
Pegasus 41 0.9 mm
Average 0.9 mm
Compared to 147 running shoes
Number of shoes
0.0 mm
Outsole wear
2.0 mm

Outsole thickness

We also checked the thickness of the rubber, and at 3.0 mm, it should pose no problems at all. It’s an average design choice, which fits very well what we consider to be the "standard" running shoe after 41 editions.

Nike Pegasus 41 Outsole thickness
Test results
Pegasus 41 3.0 mm
Average 3.2 mm
Compared to 305 running shoes
Number of shoes
0.0 mm
Outsole thickness
6.6 mm

Weight

During our initial test runs, we didn't find the Pegasus 41 particularly heavy, and it seemed to us to be on par with the previous model and other workhorses. We later confirmed this on the scale, which showed a weight just under 10 oz—specifically, 9.9 oz (281g), a minor 0.2-oz bump from its predecessor.

While we consider this a decent weight, it's not fantastic by any means, especially since the market now includes many daily trainers that offer similar features but at a much lighter weight. We believe there's room for improvement in this regard for the next year's Pegasus.

Nike Pegasus 41 Weight
Test results
Pegasus 41 9.91 oz (281g)
Average 9.38 oz (266g)
Compared to 306 running shoes
Number of shoes
5.26 oz (149g)
Weight
12.56 oz (356g)

Cushioning

Heel stack

Running shoes have been growing, and in the last two or three years, we have yet to see an update that significantly reduces stack height. Instead, the trend is towards increasing the height of shoes and adopting a maximalist approach in several daily trainers.

The Pegasus 41 follows this trend, adding more than 3 mm to reach a heel height of 33.6 mm. This is still a very average figure that works well for heel strikers, offering substantial protection even for marathoners looking for a long run shoe. However, it's still outside the maximalist category.

Nike Pegasus 41 Heel stack
Test results
Pegasus 41 33.6 mm
Average 33.7 mm
Compared to 305 running shoes
Number of shoes
7.6 mm
Heel stack
45.7 mm

Forefoot stack

The forefoot measures just 22.2 mm, which may not be enough for forefoot strikers—except for lighter runners who prefer a more grounded, natural ride without much cushioning underfoot.

Nike Pegasus 41 forefoot

While we think that forefoot strikers can enjoy the Pegasus 41 for easy runs up to 15K, those planning longer distances might want to consider the Nike Vomero 17. We even refer to it as the "Pegasus Premium" because it includes better materials and a layer of ZoomX foam, plus more stack height in this area. And a higher price tag, too.

Nike Pegasus 41 Forefoot stack
Test results
Pegasus 41 22.2 mm
Average 25.0 mm
Compared to 305 running shoes
Number of shoes
7.6 mm
Forefoot stack
36.9 mm

Drop

We always measure the drop according to the consistent standards set by World Athletics, and we discovered that the actual offset of the Pegasus 41 remains in the high end of the spectrum at 11.4 mm, only slightly higher than the 10 mm Nike claims. We're happy with such a minor discrepancy.

Test results
Pegasus 41 11.4 mm
Average 8.7 mm
Compared to 305 running shoes
Number of shoes
-0.8 mm
Drop
16.1 mm

Insole thickness

We discovered that the insole has a thickness of 5.1 mm, which enhances the overall softness of the shoe, giving it a more luxurious feel than previous Pegasus.

Nike Pegasus 41 Insole thickness
Test results
Pegasus 41 5.1 mm
Average 4.5 mm
Compared to 301 running shoes
Number of shoes
1.5 mm
Insole thickness
7.3 mm

Midsole softness

Note: a low durometer measurement equals a soft material, whereas a high measurement means it's firm.

Speaking of a luxurious feel, the standout feature of the Pegasus 41 is the introduction of ReactX foam, which we previously encountered in the InfinityRN 4 but is now making its debut in Nike's best-selling series.

What's special about this foam? Essentially, it's a refined version of React that's softer, bouncier, and, according to Nike, more sustainable. We give a big thumbs up to all these improvements here in the lab, especially because React was starting to feel a bit outdated against most competitors.

To truly gauge the softness of the ReactX foam, we sliced the shoe in half and discovered that at 15.8 HA in our durometer, it matched our initial impressions—it's plusher than the React foam in the Pegasus 40, which measured 17.6 HA, though not by a huge margin.

Nike Pegasus 41 ReactX Foam

Nonetheless, it's a positive modification for us as the shoe also returns more energy with each stride, albeit not quite reaching ZoomX levels.

Test results
Pegasus 41 15.8 HA
Average 21.4 HA
We use an average of four tests. The photo shows one of those tests.
Compared to 233 running shoes
Number of shoes
8.5 HA
Midsole softness (soft to firm)
41.5 HA

Air Pods

Another classic feature of the Pegasus series is the Air Zoom technology, which has been a staple for over a decade and repeats in version 41 with two units—one in the heel and one in the forefoot.

Nike Pegasus 41 Air Zoom

While they don't make a significant difference over the foam itself, they certainly don't detract from the shoe's performance either. Air Zoom performs reliably and endures forever, but of course they are not as responsive as the units in the Alphafly 3.

Nike Pegasus 41 Air Pods

Difference in midsole softness in cold

While ReactX offers several improvements over React, we found that its performance in cold temperatures isn't one of them. In our lab tests, the Pegasus 40 became 19.1% firmer after 20 minutes in the freezer, whereas the v41 hardened by 37.1%.

Nike Pegasus 41 Difference in midsole softness in cold
Test results
Pegasus 41 37.1%
Average 25.5%
Compared to 232 running shoes
Number of shoes
0%
Difference in midsole softness in cold
100%

Rocker

We mentioned before that this is an outstanding Peg for heel strikers, and the rocker that we discovered only confirms this. This is definitely the most curved sole Nike has ever designed for a Pegasus, featuring a notable heel bevel and a more pronounced toe spring.

Don’t get us wrong—it’s still a shoe that delivers a classic, natural ride, nothing like the Hoka Cielo X1 at all. However, in our view, those who appreciate rockered running shoes that help launch them forward when landing on the heel will find this to be the best Pegasus yet, without a doubt.

Stability

Lateral stability test

Besides the ReactX foam upgrade, another significant improvement in the Pegasus 41 over most of its predecessors is stability, especially for heel strikers.

Right from the start, we found this model to be much more supportive than earlier versions, achieving this through subtle changes that we will discuss in a moment, and some interesting enhancements such as midsole sidewalls and midfoot guidance in the outsole.

Torsional rigidity

Thanks to the full-length longitudinal groove running through the outsole, the torsional rigidity of the Pegasus 41 stays low, even with the addition of a few extra millimetres of foam in the midsole. We gave it a rating of 2 out of 5.

Test results
Pegasus 41 2
Average 3.3
Compared to 284 running shoes
Number of shoes
1
Torsional rigidity
5

Heel counter stiffness

Conversely, the heel counter undergoes a significant change. We rated the Pegasus 40 at 2 out of 5, but for the Pegasus 41, we've increased the score to 4 out of 5. This adjustment clearly aims to trade a bit of comfort for increased stability, similar to what Adidas achieved with the Supernova Rise, particularly benefiting heel strikers.

If rigid heel counters tend to irritate your Achilles, you might want to consider a shoe with an ultra-pliable heel like the On Cloudsurfer 7.

Test results
Pegasus 41 4
Average 2.8
Compared to 268 running shoes
Number of shoes
1
Heel counter stiffness
5

Midsole width in the forefoot

The Pegasus 41 is noticeably larger compared to its predecessors, a change that positively enhances the stability of the shoe. It now provides a wider landing base suitable for every runner, regardless of their footstrike.

In the forefoot, we measured 115.6 mm, which puts it in the same class as the Vomero series, known for its wider design.

Nike Pegasus 41 Midsole width in the forefoot
Test results
Pegasus 41 115.6 mm
Average 113.8 mm
Compared to 306 running shoes
Number of shoes
100.5 mm
Midsole width in the forefoot
126.5 mm

Midsole width in the heel

If there was any significant drawback for heel strikers in the Pegasus, it was the narrow heel width, which has now been effectively addressed.

Measuring at 89.2 mm, the heel width is now truly comparable to most running shoes, offering a very standard design in this area, yet the shoe maintains its agility.

Nike Pegasus 41 Midsole width in the heel
Test results
Pegasus 41 89.2 mm
Average 90.5 mm
Compared to 306 running shoes
Number of shoes
74.9 mm
Midsole width in the heel
106.6 mm

Flexibility

Stiffness

Despite its slightly more rockered design, we discovered during our test runs that the Pegasus 41 is still a classic running experience, largely due to its flexibility. The outsole design required only a minimal force of 19.2N to bend it to 90 degrees in our lab.

We're pleased with this outcome. In an era where some daily trainers have become super stiff, it's refreshing to see that some dependable, traditional daily trainers continue to provide comfort underfoot, promoting foot strength and remaining suitable for everyday activities beyond running.

Test results
Pegasus 41 19.2N
Average 29.1N
We use an average of four tests. The video shows one of those tests.
Compared to 288 running shoes
Number of shoes
2.2N
Stiffness
94.4N

Difference in stiffness in cold

Based on our initial findings with the foam, we had low expectations for this test, and unfortunately, we were correct.

Upon re-evaluating the stiffness after another 20 minutes in the freezer, we observed a 40.4% increase, which is excessive and likely to make the shoe noticeably stiffer for runners in very cold temperatures.

Test results
Pegasus 41 40.4%
Average 35.9%
Compared to 288 running shoes
Number of shoes
0%
Difference in stiffness in cold
148%

Size and fit

Besides the ReactX foam upgrade, another significant improvement in the Pegasus 41 over most of its predecessors is stability, especially for heel strikers.

Right from the start, we found this model to be much more supportive than earlier versions, achieving this through subtle changes that we will discuss in a moment, and some interesting enhancements such as midsole sidewalls and midfoot guidance in the outsole.

Toebox width at the widest part

We often hear that all Nike shoes are really narrow, but this hasn't been the case for a few years. Fortunately for you, we go beyond speculation in the lab; we meticulously measure shoes. And we discovered that the Pegasus 41, with 101.4 mm at the widest part of the upper, offers a generously wide upper in this area.

However, we must also warn you that the Peg 41 toebox now sits a bit lower, so those who prefer uppers with high vertical volume might not be happy with this change.

Conversely, runners who favour a secure, locked-in fit will find this adjustment to be perfect.

Nike Pegasus 41 Toebox width at the widest part
Test results
Pegasus 41 101.4 mm
Average 98.4 mm
Compared to 306 running shoes
Number of shoes
89.5 mm
Toebox width at the widest part
109.1 mm

Toebox width at the big toe

It's impossible to capture the full story of the toebox with a single measurement, which is why we conduct two. Our second measurement is taken in the big toe area, where we've noted that the Pegasus continues to taper quite aggressively, as usual.

Nike Pegasus 41 toebox

For an ultra-spacious, foot-shaped toebox, we recommend the Altra Torin 7. Alternatively, the Brooks Glycerin 21 offers a slightly wider but still average toebox design.

Nike Pegasus 41 Toebox width at the big toe
Test results
Pegasus 41 77.3 mm
Average 78.2 mm
Compared to 180 running shoes
Number of shoes
60.4 mm
Toebox width at the big toe
92.5 mm

Heel feel

While we often encounter shoes priced over £150 with a tongue that shifts around and drives us crazy in our test runs, we are thrilled to confirm that the Pegasus 41 keeps its fully-gusseted tongue.

This design ensures it's securely attached to the sides, significantly improving the shoe's fit, so it didn't bother us even at fast paces. Another box checked!

Tongue: gusset type

While we often encounter shoes priced over £150 with a tongue that shifts around and drives us crazy in our test runs, we are thrilled to confirm that the Pegasus 41 keeps its fully-gusseted tongue.

This design ensures it's securely attached to the sides, significantly improving the shoe's fit, so it didn't bother us even at fast paces. Another box checked!

Nike Pegasus 41 Tongue: gusset type
Test results
Pegasus 41 Both sides (full)

Comfort

Tongue padding

At the end of the day, the Peg aims to satisfy everyone, and the best way to do that in a running shoe is by adding just the right amount of padding in the tongue.

Nike Pegasus 41 tongue laces

The "Peg XLI" detail is a nice touch. As for the flat laces, they're again perfectly adequate—really, there’s nothing to worry about here!

That's exactly what Nike accomplished. With 6.6 mm of padding in a single slab of foam, we found it provides ample cushioning—even for those who tighten their laces with Hulk-like strength. We also appreciate that it features slightly less padding than its predecessor's 8.6 mm, which felt a bit excessive to us.

Nike Pegasus 41 Tongue padding
Test results
Pegasus 41 6.6 mm
Average 5.6 mm
Compared to 303 running shoes
Number of shoes
0.5 mm
Tongue padding
14.2 mm

Heel tab

We discovered that the Pegasus 41 maintains the same Achilles design as previous models, such as the Pegasus 40, marking yet another year without a finger-loop heel tab.

Nike Pegasus 41 Heel tab
Test results
Pegasus 41 None

Removable insole

We were able to remove the insole and, thanks to the shoe's standard last, we easily replaced it with some aftermarket footbeds.

Nike Pegasus 41 Removable insole
Test results
Pegasus 41 Yes

Misc

Reflective elements

Achieving an A grade in every aspect also means including reflective elements for us, and the Peg 41 delivers with three reflective pieces—one inside and two outside.

It would be easy for them to overlook these tiny details and save a bit of money on each pair—similar to the famous American Airlines olive story—but we believe that such a choice would have been far less beneficial for Nike.

Test results
Pegasus 41 Yes