Who should buy the Merrell Moab Speed Mid GTX

The Merrell Moab Speed Mid GTX is a comfortable and vegan hiking shoe best suited for:

  • experienced and discerning trail-goers who want only a reliable, lightweight and eco-friendly shoe for their next adventures
  • day hiking, speed hiking, and other outdoor pursuits

Merrell Moab Speed Mid GTX merrell

Almost weightless yet supportive

Moab Speed Mid GTX is a hiking shoe that goes against the grain. From just a spectator’s point of view, the Moab Speed Mid GTX can appear just like most high-quality hiking boots on the market, albeit possessing a bit more spunk.

Merrell Moab Speed Mid GTX Almost weightless yet supportive

However, if you dig a little deeper, you will discover two things that make the featured shoe somewhat of a rebel. We are talking about its noticeable lightness (considering it is a supportive gear) and the boot’s focus on sustainability.

Moab Speed Mid GTX offers a cushy-yet-tough platform

The former quality is straightforward, being that compared with other kicks from the same category, the Moab Speed Mid GTX is significantly lighter.

Merrell Moab Speed Mid GTX offers a cushy-yet-tough platform

This shaved-off weight, combined with the hiker’s cushy-yet-tough underfoot platform, translates to upped mobility.

Unruly laces can be an issue

The latter, on the other hand, goes against the flow of the ill effects of modernization. Indeed, having several components—laces, liners, outsole—being made with recycled materials (whether completely or partly) is something to celebrate about.

Merrell Moab Speed Mid GTX Unruly laces can be an issue

But an owner is not impressed with the boot’s laces for not staying tied, attributing the problem to their inclination to stretch too much.

Offers instant comfort

Dozens of adventurers are floored by the day-one plushness of the Merrell Moab Speed Mid GTX. One of them even called it a “no buyer’s remorse” kind of purchase.

Merrell Moab Speed Mid GTX Offers instant comfort

Many hikers find this shoe, which does not go beyond 750 grams a pair, extremely light.

Provides ankle support and breathability

With its unrelenting collar, the Moab Speed Mid GTX is mighty supportive around the ankle, say numerous trail-goers.

Merrell Moab Speed Mid GTX Provides ankle support and breathability

Secure, no-slip rides over tricky terrain await you in this propelling boot from Merrell. It comes with a removable PU footbed for improved responsiveness and breathability. Its high impermeability is among the shoe’s irresistible draws.

The frail outsole is a disappointment

The Vibram outsole is designed with 30% recycled rubber that provides solid grip on wet and dry surfaces.

Merrell Moab Speed Mid GTX The frail outsole is a disappointment

Yet again, it has been reported that the front tip of the shoe’s outsole is prone to peeling off way too soon.

Merrell Moab Speed Mid GTX is a protective hybrid shoe

This hiking shoe is a truly lightweight, protective hybrid designed to give trail-goers confidence to tackle any trail.

Merrell Moab Speed Mid GTX a protective hybrid shoe

If you are someone who prefers to work your ankles more than you need them supported, gear up with the Moab Speed GTX. A non-waterproof Moab Speed is also in existence, which should be the ideal shoe for moisture-free hikes.

Facts / Specs

Weight: 10.6oz
Use: Day Hiking, Speed Hiking
Cut: Mid cut
Collection: Merrell Moab
Features: Lightweight / Lace-to-toe, Vegan, Eco-friendly / Orthotic friendly / Removable insole
Waterproofing: Waterproof
Width: Normal

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Author
Paul Ronto
Paul Ronto

Over the past 20 years, Paul has climbed, hiked, and ran all over the world. He has summited peaks throughout the Americas, trekked through Africa, and tested his endurance in 24-hour trail races as well as 6 marathons. On average, he runs 30-50 miles a week in the foothills of Northern Colorado. His research is regularly cited in The New York Times, Washington Post, National Geographic, etc. On top of this, Paul is leading the running shoe lab where he cuts shoes apart and analyses every detail of the shoes that you might buy.