Size and fit

The Nike Air Max Plus TN Ultra is in men’s sizing. It has an upper made up of mesh, which is supported by the model’s characteristic piping. The result is a breathable, lightweight, and supportive feel. Adjusting the fit is convenient and easy with the shoe’s lace-up closure. Meanwhile, ankle mobility is unrestricted due to the sneaker’s low-cut silhouette.

Nike Air Max Plus TN Ultra Style

Two colors are available for the low-top Nike Air Max Plus TN Ultra: black/anthracite/university red/volt and pure platinum/cool grey/racer blue. These modern color schemes gives the shoe a smooth and futuristic appeal, with just the right touch of retro. The look is perfect for a street-ready everyday style.

Like most Nike sneakers, this sneaker can add an edgy touch to any outfit. Pants, jeans, or joggers paired with a t-shirt or sweatshirt will go well with the model's stylish flair. For a dressy yet casual look, the kick can be paired with slacks or chinos along with a button-down and jacket. Meanwhile, for those days when one wants to relax, hang out or walk around, the shoe can easily be worn with shorts and a t-shirt.

Notable Features

Featuring an iconic silhouette, the Nike Air Max Plus TN Ultra comes in black or grey, showcasing an upper made with lightweight and breathable mesh. This is enclosed in the shoe’s signature TPU piping, which offers additional support and bold styling. The sneaker also has an inner sleeve construction which delivers a supportive and sock-like fit.

Locking down the foot is the model’s webbing lacing system, complemented by pull tabs located on the heel and tongue for convenient on/off access. A flashy touch is added by the reflective detailing on the upper. The shoe features retro Tuned Air branding, along with the subtle Swoosh logos on the sides. Lastly, the iconic Nike Air units are visible in the forefoot and heel.

Nike Air Max Plus TN Ultra History

The Nike Air Max dynasty began with the first model's release in 1987. It was created by the legendary Tinker Hatfield, while aeronautical engineer M. Frank Rudy developed the iconic Air midsole. Today, the shoes from the Air Max line are highly sought-after for their retro appeal and fresh perspectives.

  The Nike Air Max Plus Series

One of the most enduring shoes from the collection is the Nike Air Max Plus, introduced in 1998 as the Air Max Plus Tuned. It featured the brand's Tuned Air system, later becoming known as the Air Max TN. The sneaker was designed by Sean McDowell, who took inspiration from palm trees for the upper’s wavy design. 

Additionally, the prominent shank on the arch is inspired by a whale’s tail. The Nike Air Max Plus TN was initially released in a hyper blue colorway, but it has since been introduced in many different colors, including new iterations.

  Enter the Nike Air Max Plus TN Ultra

Among the modern additions to the Air Max Plus series is the Nike Air Max Plus TN Ultra. It updates the iconic running-inspired design with even more features for comfort. This model modifies the original with a slimmer and sleeker profile, reducing weight without sacrificing the legendary Air unit, which is still seen in the forefoot and heel.

Aside from the slimmed-down sole, the upper has been updated with an inner-sleeve system wrapped with lightweight mesh. The signature TPU piping remains, resulting in a smooth look. Support and a sock-like fit are also delivered by this design.

Just like its predecessor, the sneaker is one of the most unique and eye-catching shoes that one can sport on their feet. The Nike Air Max Plus TN Ultra, in black or grey, is another instant running-inspired classic that can turn heads with its bold retro finish.

Additional Info

  • The sneaker’s rubber outsole is designed with a waffle tread for the ultimate traction and durability.
  • Lightweight cushioning is provided by the Phylon foam midsole.

Popularity

The current trend of Nike Air Max Plus TN Ultra.
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Author
Danny McLoughlin
Danny McLoughlin

Danny is a sports nut with a particular interest in football and running. He loves to watch sports as much as he loves to play. Danny was lead researcher on RunRepeat and The PFA’s report into Racial Bias in Football Commentary. His football and running research has been featured in The Guardian, BBC, New York Times and Washington Post.