Hoka One One Anacapa Low GTX: Before you buy

Are you almost convinced to get the Anacapa Low GTX yet? Or perhaps you are having second thoughts? Read through the following and make up your mind once and for all.

Highlights:

  • The shoe’s fully waterproof upper (care of Gore-Tex) and gusseted tongue translate to watertight hikes, even in three-inch-deep puddles and the like.
  • Extra rearfoot comfort is yours thanks to the Anacapa Low GTX’s plush tongue-like heel padding.
  • Its stouter-than-most heel provides double the amount of cushioning and rearfoot support.
  • The same chunky heel also mitigates shock on impact and smoothens transitions.

Caveats:

  • It lacks a heel brake, so downhill negotiations in the shoe require some skill, particularly on slick slopes.
  • The Anacapa Low GTX is among the more expensive low-top hikers on the market.

The Anacapa Low GTX and the environment

Going green is a race many brands enthusiastically participate in these days. Hoka One One’s entry is, of course, the Anacapa Low GTX. The following are what make the featured shoe an exemplar of sustainability:

  • The shoe’s water-repellent upper went through a PFC-free process. PFCs or perfluorocarbons are like plastic—they do not break down easily.
  • The Anacapa Low GTX’s upper is partly made of recycled fabric, particularly polyester.
  • Its cushy footbed is made with 50% soybean oil, a more sustainable replacement for petroleum.

Rankings

How Hoka One One Anacapa Low GTX ranks compared to all other shoes
Bottom 44% hiking shoes
All hiking shoes
Bottom 20% Hoka One One hiking shoes
All Hoka One One hiking shoes
Bottom 45% day hiking hiking shoes
All day hiking hiking shoes

Popularity

The current trend of Hoka One One Anacapa Low GTX.
Compare to another shoe:
Author
Paul Ronto
Paul Ronto

Over the past 20 years, Paul has climbed, hiked, and ran all over the world. He has summited peaks throughout the Americas, trekked through Africa, and tested his endurance in 24-hour trail races as well as 6 marathons. On average, he runs 30-50 miles a week in the foothills of Northern Colorado. His research is regularly cited in The New York Times, Washington Post, National Geographic, etc. On top of this, Paul is leading the running shoe lab where he cuts shoes apart and analyses every detail of the shoes that you might buy.