Who should buy the Vibram FiveFingers V-Trail 2.0 

You will love the Vibram FiveFingers V-Trail 2.0  if you want an appealing minimalist shoe that is durable enough that it provides dependable tractions and protects your foot from aggressive trail paths.

Vibram FiveFingers V-Trail 2.0 Vibram

Updates to the Vibram FiveFingers V-Trail 2.0

  • Designed for the unpredictable nature of the off-road
  • It has a close-to-the-ground construction to simulate a barefoot running experience, as well as individual toe-chambers for versatile movements and positional balance
  • Upper now has a water repellant 3D Cocoon mesh for consistency in its protective capacity and confidence when traversing wet surfaces
  • A 2-millimeter insole serves as the cushioning unit of the V-Trail 2.0. It lightly supports the foot without sacrificing proprioception (the perception of the surface against the foot-pad).
  •  Shielding the thin underfoot platform is the Vibram® Megagrip, a rubber that is durable and ready to handle both dry and wet terrains

Vibram FiveFingers V-Trail 2.0 whole

Enhanced protection with the Vibram FiveFingers V-Trail 2.0 outsole

Vibram’s very own Megagrip compound is used for the outsole unit of the V-Trail 2.0. This full-length layer covers the entire external pad, encompassing even the individual toe sections of the forefoot. It protects against wear-and-tear while also ensuring traction.

Vibram FiveFingers V-Trail 2.0 megagrip

A heightened surface grip is afforded by the set of non-prominent traction nodes that are on the surface of the Megagrip compound. The triangle-shaped patterns also help in bettering the motion when on inclines and rough paths.

Vibram FiveFingers V-Trail 2.0 outsole 2

Though generously placed, the rubber outsole doesn’t hinder the natural flexibility of the foot. The lack of a traditional midsole unit also reinforces such a particularity.

Vibram FiveFingers V-Trail 2.0 vibram outsole

Vibram FiveFingers V-Trail 2.0 forefoot outsole

Vibram FiveFingers V-Trail 2.0 toes outsole1

Minimalist running experience with the Vibram FiveFingers V-Trail 2.0 midsole

A 2-millimeter ethylene vinyl acetate (EVA) is used as the midsole unit of the Vibram FiveFingers V-Trail 2.0. This full-length piece offers mild cushioning that doesn’t hinder the capacity of the foot to perceive the ground.

Vibram FiveFingers V-Trail 2.0 midsole

3D Cocoon mesh upper of the Vibram FiveFingers V-Trail 2.0

The upper unit of the Vibram FiveFingers V-Trail 2.0 is made of 3D Cocoon mesh, a stretchy material that extends to the flipside of the outsole unit. The wraparound characteristic of this technology ensures snugness and security. It is even able to repel splashes of water, thereby increasing confidence when tackling wet paths.

Vibram FiveFingers V-Trail 2.0 up

Printed overlays adorn the toe-chambers. These add-ons are meant to bolster the durability of these individual spaces, ensuring that the toenails or external debris won’t tear through the fabric.

Vibram FiveFingers V-Trail 2.0 toes overlays

A single-pull lacing system is used for the upper unit. Thin yet durable shoestrings loop through fabric eyelets and stitched-on overlays, ending in a pull-and-lock tab that adjusts the tightness or looseness of the fit.

Vibram FiveFingers V-Trail 2.0 laces

Stitched-on overlays cover the sides and the heel of this running shoe. These sheets are tasked with keeping the foot in place, preventing it from wobbling or exiting the interior unceremoniously.

Vibram FiveFingers V-Trail 2.0 heel overlays

Facts / Specs

Terrain: Trail
Weight: Men 6.4oz / Women 5oz
Drop: 0mm
Arch support: Neutral
Forefoot height: 5mm
Heel height: 5mm
Pronation: Neutral Pronation / Supination / Underpronation

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Vibram FiveFingers V-Trail 2.0 video reviews

Author
Jens Jakob Andersen
Jens Jakob Andersen

Jens Jakob is a fan of short distances with a 5K PR at 15:58 minutes. Based on 35 million race results, he's among the fastest 0.2% runners. Jens Jakob previously owned a running store, when he was also a competitive runner. His work is regularly featured in The New York Times, Washington Post, BBC and the likes as well as peer-reviewed journals. Finally, he has been a guest on +30 podcasts on running.