Verdict from 9.8 hours of research from the internet

6 reasons to buy

  • The upper of the Under Armour Charged Escape 3 is praised for being secure and form-fitting.
  • Several testers report that the midfoot area of the platform is able to provide support for the arch.
  • A handful of purchasers believe that the midsole unit offers a ride that is similar to walking on clouds.
  • The durability of the materials is confirmed by some users who have worn this running shoe for extended periods.
  • Some people say that the weight of this product is relatively light and suitable for all-day use.
  • The aesthetics of this product are welcomed by casual shoe enthusiasts and those with active lifestyles.

3 reasons not to buy

  • A few consumers claim that the in-shoe experience is a bit stifling.
  • Some testers report that the Under Armour Charged Escape 3 needed a break-in period to be fully comfortable.
  • A number of purchasers were disappointed with the pricing of the shoe.

Bottom line

The overall reaction towards the Charged Escape 3 has been positive. People are mostly happy with what this Under Armour running shoe has to offer. The highlights include the upper’s accommodating construction, the midsole’s reactive and cloud-like experience, and the versatile configuration of the aesthetics. On the other hand, the warm in-shoe hug and the required break-in period became areas of criticism.

Fans of neutral running shoes ideal for the roads are the ones who are likely to enjoy the Under Armour Charged Escape 3.

Tip: see the best running shoes.

User reviews:

  • Consumers who desire a mix of fashion and performance are welcome to test the Under Armour Charged Escape 3. This update to a relatively new series of athletic shoes aims to deliver the same comfort and quality given by its predecessors but in a more durable and secure construction.
  • The changes that this model employs are on the upper. The toe box now has a protective print to heighten durability while the collar enjoys the presence of a stitched-on reinforcement that seeks to lock the foot inside the interior chamber. A heel counter is still present, but it has a discreet design to blend with the rest of the silhouette.

The standard measurements were used when the Under Armour Charged Escape 3 was made. When it comes to size, runners can use their regular choices. However, getting the best of the in-shoe experience can be affected by personally testing the product in a physical store or by studying user feedback from a variety of sources.

Elements like the form-fitting fabrics of the upper and the semi-curved shape of the platform influence the way the shoe wraps the foot and give security. The overall design still follows the natural curvature of the human foot.

The external pad of the Under Armour Charged Escape 3 is made using two types of rubber. The first one is a lightly spongy layer that covers the majority of the contact points. This piece is meant to dole out traction throughout the running session.

High-abrasion rubber is the material that’s used for the areas of the outsole that are more susceptible to wear-and-tear, namely the rear and forefoot. It is durable enough to maintain even its own structure, even after many runs.

Shallow flex grooves line the forefoot section of the external pad. These channels allow the foot to move naturally through the gait cycle, bending in conjunction with the toe joints and tendons as the step is being done.

This technology offers energy-return and responsiveness that the brand touts as consistent and steady. The heel part is firmer than the forefoot to ensure steadiness and proper shock attenuation. Energized liftoffs are the bread-and-butter of the soft forefoot section.

The comfort sockliner is placed right on top of the primary cushioning unit. This add-on offers an extra oomph to the quality of the cushioning, with its soft surface blocking the rugged nature of the shoe-last. It even has a curved midfoot to cushion the arch, an area that isn’t usually given any attention.

A cloth-like mesh is used for the external part of the upper unit. This fabric is designed to accommodate the shape of the foot while also maintaining a lightweight and breathable frame. Its seamless construction aims to prevent a bulky look while enabling an irritant-free coverage. Uppers that resemble woven cloth are used by many brands for popular shoe-series like the Mizuno Wave Inspire and the New Balance Fresh Foam 1080.

The inner sleeve is composed of a smooth textile, which wraps the foot in a secure yet non-irritating hug. It has tiny holes to preserve the breathable purpose of the facade.

The forefoot section of the upper features a printed bumper to improve durability. It prevents debris and rugged paths from ripping through the mesh.

Resting on the left and right sides of the silhouette are prints of the Under Armour logo. These seemingly aesthetic-only elements actually help in securing the foot.

The rear has a thermoplastic counter to help with the lockdown of the Achilles region. It fundamentally prevents in-shoe wobbling and accidental shoe removals.

Stitched on the external perimeter of the collar is the Comfort Collar, a layer that has padded textures for extra security and snugness. Eyelets rest on the front ends to allow the shoelaces to tighten or loosen them as needed.

A traditional lacing system graces the instep of this running shoe. Flat laces snake through print-reinforced eyestays, giving a custom wrap.

How Charged Escape 3 compares

This shoe: 93
All shoes average: 86
53 98
This shoe: $90
All shoes average: $119
$40 $350
This shoe: 9.8oz
All shoes average: 9.5oz
3.5oz 16.2oz
Author
Jens Jakob Andersen
Jens Jakob Andersen

Jens Jakob is a fan of short distances with a 5K PR at 15:58 minutes. Based on 35 million race results, he's among the fastest 0.2% runners. Jens Jakob previously owned a running store, when he was also a competitive runner. His work is regularly featured in The New York Times, Washington Post, BBC and the likes as well as peer-reviewed journals. Finally, he has been a guest on +30 podcasts on running.

jens@runrepeat.com