Size and fit

The low-top Vans Old Skool GTX shoes are unisex sneakers available in men’s range. This Vans Vault update features a lace-up fastening system for an adjustable fit. The Ultracush sockliner, meanwhile, is inserted to provide flexible and lightweight insoles. This technology allows wearers to have a balance between board feel and damping while providing excellent cushioning.

Vans Old Skool GTX Style

The Vans Old Skool Gore-Tex skate shoe features a style faithful to its primary model that was updated with features that will allow its wearers to look fashionable even in wet seasons. This model is a part of the Vault line that was stirred from arts, music, and street fashion. 

The canvas upper is treated with the breathable and waterproof Gore-Tex technology, added with suede overlays and leather Sidestripe for a plush element. The vulcanized white midsole and the waffle-patterned rubber sole, also display the classic sporty vibe. Vans offers this kick in fashionable hues, and the most popular ones are the black/heliotrope, navy/burgundy, lemon tonic/white, and white/blue hues. 

On feet, the Vans Old Skool GTX looks fashionable when paired with denim jeans, tattered skinnies, loose baggy pants, or even with a pair of shorts. Ladies may also pair this sneaker up with their dresses, mini skirts, and even with their yoga pants or leggings.

Notable Features

Aside from its timeless profile, the Vans Old Skool GTX shoes turned many heads for its unique Gore-Tex applique. The canvas upper is dressed in the Gore-Tex fabric with repeating print of pill-shaped dots and the Gore-Tex logo. This material is used to convert this sneaker into a waterproof, durable, and breathable pair of footwear.

Vans Old Skool GTX History

Vans launched the rOld Skool in 1978 as the first-ever skate shoe that has leather panels and suede on the toe box. It was also the first to display the iconic Side Stripe trademark, or also known as jazz stripe, which was a result of a random doodle of Paul Van, one of the founders of the brand. 

Because of its versatility and timeless look, Vans Old Skool easily gained followers. In the 90s, it was seen worn by numerous skaters, singers, celebrities, and rock stars. This silhouette was also used as the parent model by several collaborations, which created a pivotal event in the sneakers’ history of partnerships. Currently, Vans Old Skool caters young and old generations. Various modifications were also applied on the Old Skool to give homage to the brand’s colorful skateboarding history.

Meanwhile, Vans has this premium label called the Vans Vault. This line releases silhouettes from the archives that have been modernized inspired by arts, music, fashion, street, and the world of skateboarding and surfing. In-house company designers will decide with Vans sneakers will be given a modern twist to offer to their fans.

To add another iteration to the growing list of sneakers under the Vans Vault is the retro Vans Old Skool GTX. Vans tweaked the iconic Old Skool with the breathable and waterproof material called Gore-Tex to provide comfort and protection to its users during harsh weather conditions.s, allowing for optimal climate comfort.

Nice to know

  • This skate shoe comes with an extra pair of Gore-Tex laces.
  • The Vans Old Skool GTX sneakers for men and women are made of gum rubber outsole that delivers superb grip and durability.
  • It has a rubber heel patch for added durability.

Facts / Specs

Base model: Vans Old Skool
Style: Retro, Sporty
Top: Low
Inspired from: Skate
Collection: Vans Old Skool
Closure: Laces
Material: Canvas, Suede, Rubber Sole, Vulc Sole, Gum Sole, EVA / Fabric

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Vans Old Skool GTX unboxing and on-feet videos

Author
Danny McLoughlin
Danny McLoughlin

Danny is a sports nut with a particular interest in football and running. He loves to watch sports as much as he loves to play. Danny was lead researcher on RunRepeat and The PFA’s report into Racial Bias in Football Commentary. His football and running research has been featured in The Guardian, BBC, New York Times and Washington Post.