Under Armour TriBase Reign 3: A minor step up from its well-loved predecessor

Like the rest of its lineage, this model is a CrossFit shoe revered for its performance and good looks. It lives up to its older siblings' good reputation and features several revisions.

The UA TriBase Reign 3 builds on the TriBase Reign 2's reported weakness by changing the upper and heel cup design to promote better fit, comfort, and lighter weight.

Head below for a more comprehensive comparison between the two shoes.

Who is it for? This trainer could satisfy fitness enthusiasts who look for the following attributes:

  • A more comfortable rendition of the UA TriBase Reign 2
  • Bootie upper design that's supportive and breathable
  • Excellent stability and ground contact for weightlifting
  • Versatile CrossFit shoe that adequately performs in most workouts

Under Armour TriBase Reign 3 vs. TriBase Reign 2

Below are the significant differences between the two UA trainers:

  • New upper design. The Reign 3 now employs engineered mesh upper and bootie design. This construction can accommodate wider feet and eliminates excess seam that could cause chafing compared to the Reign 2's regular mesh upper.
  • Improved heel cup design. The shape of the Reign 3's heel counter is revised for improved stability, and an added ridge provides grip during headstand pushups on the wall.

Apart from these, everything else stayed the same - from the responsive midsole to the UA TriBase's excellent stability and ground contact to the overall impressive performance during workouts.

Rankings

How Under Armour TriBase Reign 3 ranks compared to all other shoes
Top 10% crossfit training shoes
All crossfit training shoes
Top 7% Under Armour training shoes
All Under Armour training shoes
Top 3% cross-training training shoes
All cross-training training shoes

Popularity

The current trend of Under Armour TriBase Reign 3.
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Author
Nicholas Rizzo
Nicholas Rizzo

Nick combines 10+ years of experience in the health and fitness industry and a background in the sciences in his role as the Fitness Research Director. During his competitive powerlifting years his PRs have him sitting in the top 2% of bench presses (395 lbs), top 3% of squats (485 lbs) and top 6% of deadlifts (515 lbs) for his weight and age. His work has been featured on Bodybuilding.com, LiveStrong, Healthline, WebMD, WashingtonPost, and many more. Along the way, collaborating with industry leaders like Michael Yessis, Mark Rippetoe, Carlo Buzzichelli, Dave Tate, Ray Williams, and Joel Seedman.