Who should buy the Tretorn Nylitehi

This vintage Tretorn Nylitehi could be a great match for you if:

  • You are looking for a versatile pair that features an EcoOrtholite insole that provides underfoot comfort.
  • You want a shoe that blends beautifully with almost anything that you wear.

Tretorn Nylitehi Logo

Style of the Tretorn Nylitehi

Nylite sneakers would not be a Nylite if not for the iconic bicycle stitching along a Tretorn silhouette’s upper. The Tretorn Nylitehi is one of those who indeed extended that construction all the way up to the bottom of the shin. To say the least, it kind of resembles SK8-His from Vans with a more streamlined appeal.

Tretorn Nylitehi Upper material

Gentlemen and the ladies are gifted with the opportunity to sport these Swedish-hailed sneakers. The vintage white or black colorways of the women’s version can be partnered up with leggings and skinny jeans. 

Tretorn Nylitehi High top

Notable Features

If one noticed it, there are numerous high-top versions of the Nylite surfacing the market. The Tretorn Nylitehi is perhaps the fundamental model that other colorways or revamps were based upon.

Tretorn Nylitehi Midsole

This sneaker fulfills the legacy of the Swedish brand by proudly employing the Gullwing logos in a leather component. The collars are also padded with a bit of a folding feature to add to its flair.

Tretorn Nylitehi Insole

History of the Tretorn Nylitehi

The company named Tretorn came a long way from manufacturing rubber cleats to selling hip tennis-inspired footwear. Its roots can be traced down from their first settlement in Helsingborg, Sweden during the cusp of the industrial revolution. It was founded by Johan Dunker which eventually passed it on to his son named Henry.

Tretorn Nylitehi Collar

Henry was the pinnacle catalyst of the brand and can roughly be assumed to be the reason behind Tretorn’s century-old success as of date. Giving free health care and an option for day care services was one of the heartwarming feats that the Swedish man offered his workforce. After decades, the galosh market crept its way into the sports scene, which then focused on tennis.

Tretorn Nylitehi Toe box

The Nylite has initially been a low top tennis sneaker released in 1967. Not only was it classy and stylish, but it also proved its worth when it comes to court flexibility and function. During its prime, it was considered as a luxury sports shoe which was highlighted in Wimbledon 1976.

Tretorn Nylitehi Outsole

Including the Nylite into the Official Preppy Handbook during the 80s was a significant turning point for the model’s prominence in the fashion platform. Soon after, teens and party-goers rooted for the shoe as their staple option for everyday wear. Heck, even pop idol Billy Joel flexed a piece in his 52nd Street album cover.

Tretorn Nylitehi Heel

So many years have passed yet the Nylite remains present in the fashion scene thanks to its persistent cult following. Though its presence cannot be compared to those sportswear giants like Nike and Adidas, fans kept its fire burning which Tretorn responded dearly by introducing more colorways and versions of the Nylite.

Tretorn Nylitehi Laces

One of the vintage renditions of the classic sneaker is the Tretorn Nylitehi--the high top brother of the flagship model. Oozing with nostalgia, the sneaker replenishes the long lost love for the high top Nylite which, fortunately, is now available in numerous colorways starting with black and white.

Tretorn Nylitehi Print

Facts / Specs

Top: High
Inspired from: Tennis
Collection: Tretorn Nylite
Colorways: Black / Blue / White
SKUs: MTNYLITEHI1 / MTNYLITEHI710 / WTNYLITEHI001 / WTNYLITEHI150

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Author
Danny McLoughlin
Danny McLoughlin

Danny is a sports nut with a particular interest in football and running. He loves to watch sports as much as he loves to play. Danny was lead researcher on RunRepeat and The PFA’s report into Racial Bias in Football Commentary. His football and running research has been featured in The Guardian, BBC, New York Times and Washington Post.