Verdict from 6.9 hours of research from the internet

92
Great!
2305 users: 4.6 / 5

6 reasons to buy

  • Most users remarked that the Skechers Flex Appeal 2.0 - Break Free was comfortable for daily use.
  • Plenty of consumers appreciated its lightweight nature.
  • According to a plethora of reviews, the Memory Foam cushioning felt amazing and breathable.
  • Many thought that this pair of workout shoes was a good value for money.
  • People with wide feet appreciated the roomy width of the trainer.
  • It was commended for its casually stylish aesthetics by a few buyers.

3 reasons not to buy

  • A significant number of critics complained about the uncomfortable build of the shoe due to the lack of padding around the collar, insufficient cushioning, and pressure points on the forefoot.
  • A couple of naysayers found it inconvenient that the shoelaces were constantly getting untied.
  • Several complaints detailed the poor quality of the trainers, with reports that it wore out after a couple of weeks of use.

Bottom line

The Skechers Flex Appeal 2.0 - Break Free received a positive reception from the shoppers. Its standout features were the lightweight and comfortable construction, the cushy Memory Foam footbed, the affordable price, and the wide width profile. However, it also garnered negative reviews for causing discomfort in some sections. In conclusion, the flaws still did not deter the consumers from deeming this footgear a solid training shoe for various workouts.

Tip: see the best training shoes.

User reviews:

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  • The Skechers Flex Appeal 2.0 - Break Free is an updated version of the original Flex Appeal 2.0. It has a lot of similarities especially with the style, construction, and materials. However, the current iteration put a new twist to it by using a soft mesh fabric upper this time around. It is a lightweight, breathable, and flexible material that offers a barely-there feel. It also has more perforations than its predecessor to enhance the ventilation in the foot chamber.

The Skechers Flex Appeal 2.0 - Break Free allows the foot to flex as much as it could with its super flexible rubber outsole. It is also designed to provide multidirectional traction for a secure foothold.

A lightweight compound called the FlexSole 2.0 makes up the midsole of the Skechers Flex Appeal 2.0 - Break Free. It protects the foot from impact to prevent injuries.

The underfoot is kept fresh and cool by the Air Cooled Memory Foam. It also has memory retention properties, which make it conform to the contours of the foot to give equal coverage of cushioning.

The Skechers Flex Appeal 2.0 - Break Free maintains the lightweight form of the upper through its nearly seamless design. It is made of a soft mesh fabric that promotes flexibility, breathability, and comfort. The forefoot has a ventilation panel to allow air to circulate throughout the foot chamber.

The tongue and the collar are padded for a snug fit. They also protect the skin from chafing and irritations.

It uses a lace-up closure to lock the foot down. When tightened, it also fortifies the sides to boost lateral support.

A pull tab is connected to a heel stripe bearing the Skechers branding. It enables an easy wear-on action.

Size and fit

True to size based on 423 user votes
Small (5%)
True to size (93%)
Large (1%)
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How Flex Appeal 2.0 - Break Free compares

This shoe: 92
All shoes average: 84
57 96
This shoe: £70
All shoes average: £90
£40 £310
Author
Nicholas Rizzo
Nicholas Rizzo

Nick is a powerlifter who believes cardio comes in the form of more heavy ass squats. Based on over 1.5 million lifts done at competitions, his PRs place him as an elite level powerlifter. His PRs have him sitting in the top 2% of bench presses (395 lbs), top 3% of squats (485 lbs) and top 6% of deadlifts (515 lbs) for his weight and age. His work has been featured on Forbes, Bodybuilding.com, Elite Daily and the like. Collaborating along the way with industry leaders like Michael Yessis, Mark Rippetoe, Carlo Buzzichelli, Dave Tate, Ray Williams, and Joel Seedman.

nick@runrepeat.com