Updates to Northside Montero Mid Waterproof

  • Northside’s Montero Mid Waterproof allows hikers to tackle the outdoors in different weather conditions. Its leather upper uses a waterproof seam-sealed construction to provide protection on the trails.
  • The boot’s midsole and footbed, both made of ethylene-vinyl acetate or EVA, render comfort and cushioning underfoot. Its rubber outsole which features aggressive lugs, takes care of the boot’s traction.

Size and fit

The Northside Montero Mid Waterproof is a mid-cut hiker for men. It is available in medium (D) width and regular sizes. It reasonably runs true to size. User’s desired fit is achieved through the help of its lace-up closure.

Outsole

With its rubber outsole, the Montero Mid Waterproof affords grip on various terrain types, whether wet or dry. The space between its angled lugs is textured to prevent muck from building up, sustaining its adhesion on ground surfaces.

Midsole

The Northside Montero Mid Waterproof employs a lightweight ethylene-vinyl acetate (EVA) midsole. It makes each ride comfortable by absorbing ground impacts and providing rebound. Its removable insole is also made of EVA which enhances these benefits

Upper

This ankle-high leather hiker from Northside has a resilient suede upper with nylon inserts to promote breathability. Its waterproof seam-sealed construction prevents water intrusions while the moisture-wicking lining maintains a fresh feel. Comfort is enhanced with its padded tongue and collar.

For extra trail protection, it is designed with a scuff-proof toe guard. Its gusseted tongue keeps loose debris at bay. Assisting in fit management is the boot’s closure system which includes webbing eyelets and a pair of metal loops. Also, a pull strap at the heel aids in easy on and off.

Popularity

The current trend of Northside Montero Mid Waterproof.
Compare to another shoe:
Author
Paul Ronto
Paul Ronto

Over the past 20 years, Paul has climbed, hiked, and ran all over the world. He has summited peaks throughout the Americas, trekked through Africa, and tested his endurance in 24-hour trail races as well as 6 marathons. On average, he runs 30-50 miles a week in the foothills of Northern Colorado. His research is regularly cited in The New York Times, Washington Post, National Geographic, etc. On top of this, Paul is leading the running shoe lab where he cuts shoes apart and analyses every detail of the shoes that you might buy.