Size and fit

The Nike Drop-Type Mid is available in men’s sizing. It is a unisex shoe, so ladies can still grab a pair by sizing 1.5 down. With its mid-cut silhouette, it provides ankle protection than the low-top ones. The shoe’s traditional lacing system keeps the foot securely locked down. 

The shoe upper with holes at the medial and lateral sides allows adequate air ventilation, keeping the foot fresh and dry. It has a spongy tongue that gives support. Also, it has an EVA insole and double-layered midsole that provide cushioning and impact protection.

Nike Drop-Type Mid Style

From the NikeCourt family, the Drop-Type Mid is a tennis-inspired sneaker that showcases a somewhat like the Blazers Mid but with a deconstructed upper. It features tonal stitching. 

On the toe box is a sturdy rubber detailing that is borrowed from the All Court 2 sneaker, putting an experimental edge on the shoe’s design. The double-layered white midsole provides durability as well as an excellent contrast on the colored suede overlays.

Swoosh icons are accented on the vamp and tongue areas while the “N.354” is adorning just below the black eyestays. Also, it has a significantly fat tongue that showcases a unique style. 

Some of its colorways are:

  • Summit White/Black/Anthracite/Alabaster
  • Sail/Black/Bicycle Yellow/Habanero Red
  • White/Black/Anthracite/Legion Green
  • Dusty Olive/Summit White/Wolf Grey
  • Dark Obsidian/Summit White/Black
  • Summit White/Anthracite/White/Stone Mauve

With a versatile silhouette, the Nike Drop-Type Mid can quickly complement a variety of casual clothing like shorts, cargo pants, denim jeans, miniskirts, leggings, or jumpsuits. For a sportier vibe, joggers, track pants, and other sports outfits can work well too. 

Notable Features

Pushing the boundary of style, Nike introduced the Drop-Type Mid that exhibits subtle sophistication. It features a silhouette that looks like the Blazer Mid but with a deconstructed style. It also highlights a long and fat tongue, changing the game on the usual details and proportions. 

Inspired by the All Court 2 sneaker, it showcases a rubberized toe cap that gives significant toe protection and familiar vibe. Lastly, it has an autoclave construction that fuses the outsole and midsole for a graceful look and sleek design.

Nike Drop-Type Mid History

Nike Drop Type shoes, from low-top to mid-top silhouettes, are released in 2019. Some of the iterations are Drop Type, Drop-Type LX, Drop-Type Premium, and Drop-Type Mid. They all feature a hybrid design that displays a stripped-down character. 

Speaking of the Drop-Type Mid, it has a spongy tongue like the rest. On the back of the tongue is a mesh material to provide comfort while the front area is made of nylon. 

With a sleek construction, it has an upper made of nylon and suede materials that display an unfinished-like aesthetic. Printed on the soles are texts that say, “The DROP-TYPE’ DESIGN IS BASED ON A PROTOTYPE NIKE AIR MOWABB FROM 2001.”

Nice to know

  • The N.354 pertains to the mile time that Steve Prefontaine ran, a runner for Oregon. Bill Bowerman, the founder of Nike, coached him. Nike shoes were tested first by Prefontaine, who was known as the soul and cornerstone of Nike. 
  • The N354 shoes are dedicated to Steve Prefontaine.
  • On March 23, 2020, a patchwork version of the Nike Drop-Type Mid was released. 
  • It has a white rubber outsole for stability and traction.

Facts / Specs

Base model: Nike Drop-Type
Style: Sporty
Top: Mid
Inspired from: Tennis
Collection: Nike N354
Closure: Laces
Material: Rubber Sole, EVA, Nylon / Fabric

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Author
Danny McLoughlin
Danny McLoughlin

Danny is a sports nut with a particular interest in football and running. He loves to watch sports as much as he loves to play. Danny was lead researcher on RunRepeat and The PFA’s report into Racial Bias in Football Commentary. His football and running research has been featured in The Guardian, BBC, New York Times and Washington Post.