Who should buy the Merrell Moab 3 Mid

The Moab 3 Mid is a no-frills yet pretty essential warm-weather hiking boot. Purchase it if:

  • You wish to give your feet a break from sweatiness and the stink it entails.
  • Summer hiking boots that provide multi-directional grip are what you're after.
  • You're on a mission to convince your friends that great durability doesn't always equal priciness.
  • Being able to hike long distances minus the achy arches sounds fantastic to you.

 Merrell Moab 3 Mid buyd

Who should NOT buy it

If you find the women's Moab 3 Mid (400 g) a bit heavy, check out the super-light Altra Lone Peak Hiker, which weighs 281 g per kick. Also, you might be better off with the Salomon Quest 4 GTX—a boot with a more solid sole unit.

Merrell Moab 3 Mid noa

Dreamy confines on day one

According to numerous hikers, the Moab 3 Mid feels super-comfy minus the lengthy break-in period. "It felt like I was walking on clouds," says one of them. Another one says that it's "extremely comfortable on long hikes." Yet another reviewer says that their Moab 3 Mids "feel better and better" with repeated use.

Merrell Moab 3 Mid comfa

The Merrell Moab 3 Mid's 10/10 support

Both its ankle cuff and arch zone are mighty supportive, many trail-goers say. The following are their raves about it:

  • "Solid ankle support."
  • "Best support on my ankles and arch."
  • "Feet didn’t hurt at the end of the day."

Merrell Moab 3 Mid supp

Super-clingy steps in every pair

A considerable number of adventurers are impressed with the sticking prowess of the Moab 3 Mid. "The Vibram sole is fantastic," says an experienced adventurer. One other outdoorsy individual is also hyped about the boot's outsole, saying that its "deep treads have a strong grip."

Merrell Moab 3 Mid cling

Needs extra lightness

One of its very few criticisms, which can be considered a nitpick, is the women's version's could-be-lighter weight. A female trail-goer would've loved the Moab 3 Mid more had it been a touch lighter. FYI: the featured kick is 32 g heavier than the average weight of women's breathable hiking boots, which is 368 g apiece.

Merrell Moab 3 Mid light

Moab 3 Mid: A budget-friendly tank

With comments such as "boots are super sturdy" and "well-made with strong eyelet loops," the inexpensive Merrell Moab 3 Mid is one tough-as-nails summer hiker. An experienced nature traveler is among those who are floored by the boot's tank-like durability, saying that it's "still holding up," even after hiking in it for over 70 miles.

The shoe's toughness is matched by its affordability, too. Indeed, at $120 a pop, the mid-collared Moab 3 undercuts most hiking boots by a whopping $76! For more budget-friendly boots, click here.

Merrell Moab 3 Mid durafford

Fresh and funk-free feet

Reviewers have no doubts that the Merrell Moab 3 Mid has superb ventilation. They are "great at allowing my feet to breathe," says one of them. Another one among them was just happy that his feet felt fresh the entire time and didn't get stinky at all.

Merrell Moab 3 Mid fresh

Wanted: A firmer midsole (toe zone)

A female hiker finds the toe end of the Moab 3 Mid's midsole a little too soft. Because of her foot condition—where her right big toe gets too painful on squishy midsoles—she had to let go of her Moab 3s, saying: "I wish I could have kept them." Apparently, she loved everything about the boot, except for that one unique flaw.

Facts / Specs

Weight: Men 500g / Women 400g
Use: Day Hiking
Cut: Mid cut
Features: Eco-friendly, Lace-to-toe / Orthotic friendly / Breathable / Removable insole
Width: Normal, Wide
BRAND Brand: Merrell
Construction: Eco-friendly, Lace-to-toe

Compare popularity Interactive

Compare the popularity of another shoe to Merrell Moab 3 Mid:

Merrell Moab 3 Mid video reviews

Author
Paul Ronto
Paul Ronto

Over the past 20 years, Paul has climbed, hiked, and ran all over the world. He has summited peaks throughout the Americas, trekked through Africa, and tested his endurance in 24-hour trail races as well as 6 marathons. On average, he runs 30-50 miles a week in the foothills of Northern Colorado. His research is regularly cited in The New York Times, Washington Post, National Geographic, etc. On top of this, Paul is leading the running shoe lab where he cuts shoes apart and analyses every detail of the shoes that you might buy.