Summary

We spent 6.5 hours reading reviews from experts and users. In summary, this is what approachers think:

5 reasons to buy

  • Almost every review about the Mammut Hueco Low GTX tells of the shoe’s astronomical level of comfort.
  • Design-wise, this approach shoe is phenomenal, according to several customers.
  • Based on a report, the Hueco Low GTX is outstanding when it comes to waterproofing.
  • It has an incredibly sticky outsole, says someone who has used the hiker numerous times.
  • This Mammut offering is exemplary in terms of stability, a convinced tester claims.

2 reasons not to buy

  • Based on a user review, this Mammut approach shoe has unruly laces.
  • An owner finds the Hueco Low GTX’s laces a bit too long.

Bottom line

Superbly comfortable—this is what many will likely call the Hueco Low GTX the moment they don it. That said, this piece of gear is more than just a comfort wonder. Indeed, it is also a looker with amazing surface traction and water protection to boot.

The Mammut approach shoe in question, however, might infuriate some with its problematic laces. Nevertheless, the Hueco Low GTX is a fantastic offering, thanks to its excellence in both form and function.

Facts

-The Mammut Hueco Low GTX, the waterproof sibling of the Hueco Low, is built for adventurers who need a combination of comfort, protection, and security in their travels. Its Strobel construction translates to giving the wearer a supportive ride with as much cushioning as possible.

-Its ability to fence out intrusive wet elements is courtesy of Gore-Tex. What capacitates it to provides enough grip over a variety of surfaces, on the other hand, is the Square Tech outsole from Michelin.

A below-the-ankle approach shoe for men and women is the Mammut Hueco Low GTX. It comes with heel stabilizers, which prevent the heel from slipping out of place. Its lace-up closure delivers a secure and personalized fit. This lockdown system has midfoot cords that grant hikers extra snugness around the instep zone.

The Hueco Low GTX can stick to virtually all sorts of backcountry surfaces thanks to its heavy-duty rubber outsole, called Michelin Square Tech. As it is built with low-profile lugs, approach enthusiasts can move across slippery terrain on it with multi-directional traction. Around its front end is the climbing zone—a common approach shoe feature that provides additional adhesive power during forefoot maneuvers, which include edging and smearing.

This approach-focused hiker from Mammut uses a wedge-type midsole for cushioning and stability. Its entirety is made of EVA or ethylene-vinyl acetate, a foam-like material widely known for its stress and crack resistance, as well as high rebound rate. Its stout construction delivers ample shock absorption, especially around the medial section of the foot.

Mammut designers paired this springy component with a textured footbed for extra cushioning underfoot. This stock insole also delivers additional support.

The foot is protected from the harshness of the elements in the Hueco Low GTX’s velours leather upper. Stitched securely to its heel is a synthetic pull cord for easier on and off. Its main bootie is lined with Gore-Tex’s Performance Comfort technology, which renders the shoe adequately breathable on the inside and sufficiently watertight on the outside.

This finely fuzzy component comes with a rubber toe cap and TPU (thermoplastic polyurethane) panels. The former deals with virtually everything that tries to assault the foot from the front, while the latter—the heel stabilizers—doubles down on rearfoot support.

The Mammut Hueco Low GTX’s upper comes full circle with the gear’s closure system. It is comprised of a thin yet hardy synthetic lace and reinforced eyelets with instep-locking cords.