Who should buy the Inov-8 Rocfly G 390

The Rocfly G 390 is a full-fledged hiker with some welcome characteristics from trail runners. Buy it if:

  • You need a combination of springiness, flexibility, and control in your step.
  • You've been searching for ultra-light boots that last long.
  • Breathable boots that get dry in no time are what you prefer.

Inov-8 Rocfly G 390 buya

Who should NOT buy it

At $140 a pair and with no negative feedback on its tongue, the Topo Athletic Trailventure is a nice alternative to the Rocfly G 390. Also, if you're skeptical about the featured boot's performance on mud, check out the Salomon Cross Hike Mid GTX.

Inov-8 Rocfly G 390 nob

Higher leaps in the lightweight Rocfly G 390

Thanks mainly to its springy and uber-flexible sole unit, the Rocfly G 390 makes each step feel guided and supercharged. Experienced hikers agree, praising it with the following remarks:

  • "Surprised at how bouncy the G-Fly foam felt."
  • "Provides acres of bouncy energy return."
  • "It was really propelling me forward."

The boot's lightness (390 g apiece) also deserves credit here, with a blogger saying that it's "unbelievably light for a hiking shoe." "It's as light as my slippers," or it's like a "moon boot," says another critic. FYI: the average weight of hiking boots is 568 g, making the Rocfly G 390 lighter by 178 g in comparison.

Inov-8 Rocfly G 390 light

Wow-level pampering in every box

With hot takes such as "it felt like I was standing on pillows" and "underfoot cushioning feels luxurious," the Inov-8 Rocfly G 390 truly has heavenly comfort. And the cherry on top? The boot's extreme level of comfiness is available straight out of the gate.

Inov-8 Rocfly G 390 comf

Sticky on virtually everything else except mud

Gear pundits are very impressed with the shoe's dry-ground stickiness (i.e., gravelly terrain, grass, and dirt tracks). "The traction of the Rocfly G 390 is superb," says one of them.

That being said, some footwear mavens aren't that impressed with the boot's performance on mud. One of them really struggled with the boot in one mucky area he had to cross.

Inov-8 Rocfly G 390 grippybut

The enduring Inov-8 Rocfly G 390

This speedster of a day hiker shines in the area of durability, according to experts. One of them says that its "graphene grip just won’t quit." Another one says that he is "extremely impressed with the lack of wear on the upper" after hiking for 350 miles in the shoe.

Inov-8 Rocfly G 390 dura

Always ready for warm adventurers

Professional reviewers are convinced that the Inov-8 Rocfly G 390 is remarkably breathable, with one saying that it's "ideal for hot weather hiking." They also applaud its quick-drying upper, which sheds off wetness a few hours after getting completely soaked.

Inov-8 Rocfly G 390 breath

Quite pricey for its kind

"Hard to swallow"—this is how one trusted blogger finds the Rocfly G 390's 210-dollar asking price. Compared with the average price of breathable hiking boots ($157), the hiker in question is $53 more expensive.

Inov-8 Rocfly G 390 price

Its fit rocks

It "molded to my feet like a pair of old slippers," says one of the experts who find the boot's fit glove-like. Speaking of fit, the Rocfly G 390 has a satisfyingly roomy toe box, and gear journalists love it.

Inov-8 Rocfly G 390 fit

The Rocfly G 390's unruly tongue

One of the minor misfires of the Rocfly G 390 is its shifting tongue. A professional footgear tester says that it has a habit of not staying centered.

Facts / Specs

Weight: 390g
Use: Light Hiking, Speed Hiking
Cut: Mid cut
Features: Lightweight / Orthotic friendly / Breathable / Removable insole
Width: Normal, Wide / Normal
BRAND Brand: Inov-8
Fit: Wide toe box

Compare popularity Interactive

Compare the popularity of another shoe to Inov-8 Rocfly G 390:

Inov-8 Rocfly G 390 video reviews

Author
Paul Ronto
Paul Ronto

Over the past 20 years, Paul has climbed, hiked, and ran all over the world. He has summited peaks throughout the Americas, trekked through Africa, and tested his endurance in 24-hour trail races as well as 6 marathons. On average, he runs 30-50 miles a week in the foothills of Northern Colorado. His research is regularly cited in The New York Times, Washington Post, National Geographic, etc. On top of this, Paul is leading the running shoe lab where he cuts shoes apart and analyses every detail of the shoes that you might buy.