Five Ten Freerider Pro review

The Five Ten Freerider Pro is a stability cycling shoe designed for those who want a high grip and who crave a cushioned ride. It is a versatile shoe that hikes well while carrying a bike and looks just as good as it performs.

Unfortunately, the top of the shoe forms an uncomfortable crease into the foot and toes when walking or perching on the pedals. Maybe it will soften with continued use. 

Who should buy it

This is an ideal shoe for people seeking increased rigidity and power transfer while riding over obstacles and climbing hills.

Who should NOT buy it

The Five Ten Freerider Pro can have an unnatural walking feel due to the stiff sole. The stiffness of the sole is not ideal for people who find themselves off the bike for some distance while hiking steep lines. For a more flexible shoe, consider the Five Ten Freerider Elements.

The Five Ten Freerider has a similar grip as the Pro version, but will better suit those who want increased sole flexibility and an easier time readjusting on the pedals.

If you want a breathable cycling shoe, the Five Ten Trailcross LT is worth checking out.

The Five Ten Freerider Pro is a fit-ready shoe right of the box

The shoe fits true to size in length, with a roomier toe box for the toes to curl and stretch. This could be a problem for riders with narrow feet because the shoe is difficult to lace tightly.

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It will help you ride-all-day

It takes a special shoe to forget your wearing them, and that’s what it feels like with the Five Ten Freedrider Pro.

I was surprised by the cushioning around the entirety of the shoe. If you are looking for a stiff cycling shoe that doesn’t rub around your ankles and the top of your foot, then the Five Ten Freerider Pro is for you. Even while wearing thin and low socks, the Five Ten Freerider Pro was soft and left me blister-free. The lace knots were undetectable thanks to the cushioned tongue.

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Keep your footing with the Five Ten Freerider Pro

The moment you step onto the bike pedal while wearing the Five Ten Freerider Pro you can feel the sole grip onto the pedal. It’s a clipped-in sensation with a clipless shoe. I expected the stiff sole to cause fatigue in the arches of my foot, but surprisingly the Five Ten Freerider Pro has excellent bounce and support.

I hit plenty of rocks hidden beneath the fallen leaves, but the shoe quickly absorbed the impact for a smooth ride while my feet stayed secured to the pedals.

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I, unfortunately, experienced awkward creasing near the toebox when perching on the pedals. This is problematic if you prefer a shoe with a more flexible upper.

Be ready to ride with the Freerider Pro

Out of the box, the Five Ten Freerider Pro is ready to go. The shoe was snug without feeling too tight. The extra room in the toebox took some time to get used to, but I enjoyed the extra room. 

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The Five Ten Freedrider Pro won’t weigh down

The Five Ten Freerider Pro is the lightest mountain biking shoe I ever tried. I had an older model a few years ago, but the newer Five Ten Freerider Pro feels lighter but more reinforced. A very light 14-ounce shoe will keep you light on your feet for hours. 

It is not fancy but seems long-lasting

The good old design makes me think the Five Ten Freerider Pro can handle it all. The shoe is pretty standard so there aren’t any straps to break or ratchets that will loosen. The sole maintained its stiffness and the materials displayed no wear. 

The synthetic upper carried no staining and were easily wiped clean. I estimate the Five Ten Freerider Pro will still look new in a few years, but the tread will diminish. 

No-slip grip with the Five Ten Freerider Pro

The Five Ten Freerider Pro held a tremendous grip on the pedals. This remained consistent even walking through wet leaves before mounting the bike. If the grip is what you seek, the Five Ten Freerider Pro is what you need. However, this will be problematic for rides that warrant more foot mobility.

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Not for hot rides

The Five Ten Freerider Pro has multiple perforations for ventilation, but this show does not breathe. Even during a cool fall day, my feet felt toasty. If I ride during a warm or hot day, this might not be the shoe I use. 

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Lockdown 

The wide tongue helps to keep the Five Ten Freerider Pro in place and cups the top of the foot. The laces are basic but have plenty of lengths to tie your knots however you please. The extra room in the toebox made me worried that I would experience heel-lift, but the shoe felt fitted to my foot even when being perched on the pedals. 

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A smart buy

I would consider the Five Ten Freerider Pro to be affordable (cycling shoes have an average price of $210) There are more expensive mountain biking shoes on the market, but this is a smart buy for those who want to experience a clipped-in feel without upgrading their pedal system. 

Conclusion 

If you're looking for a skate shoe style, I would recommend  The Five Ten Freerider Pro. It will offer complete control of your down-stroke, but I would not recommend this shoe for people who get easily warm from performance. 

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The stiff crease on the top of the shoe put pressure on the top of my foot and became uncomfortable after a couple of hours. I am unsure if after a few months of wear if the upper sole would soften. 

Facts / Specs

Weight: Men 340g / Women 300g
Base model: Five Ten Freerider
Use: Mountain
Cleat design: Flat
Closure: Lace
Collection: Five Ten Stealth Rubber
Material: Synthetic upper

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Author
Christina Dalton