Updates to Adidas Terrex Tivid Mid CP

  • Adidas Terrex Tivid Mid CP is created with versatility in mind. It is intended for use in easy hiking paths and city streets. Its textile upper is reinforced in the toe and heel area which optimizes protection on the trails. The brand’s very own Climaproof membrane keeps the foot dry even if it is pouring outside.
  • It employs an ethylene-vinyl acetate (EVA) midsole for cushioning and comfort. On the other hand, its Traxion outsole yields a grippy ride.

Size and fit

The Terrex Tivid Mid CP is a men’s-only hiking boot. It’s offered in medium width and comes in whole and half sizes. It reasonably runs true to size. A secure foot lockdown is granted by its lace-up closure.

Outsole

Enabling this hiking boot to grip on virtually all types of terrain is its Traxion outsole. Its profile includes boots that deliver multi-directional traction. The space in between the lugs keeps mud from building up and channels water out to prevent slippage.

Midsole

The Adidas Terrex Tivid Mid CP uses an ethylene-vinyl acetate or EVA for its midsole. This lightweight material provides durable cushioning. It is also to absorb shock from ground impacts which makes the user’s stride comfortable.

Upper

This hiking boot from Adidas wears a textile upper for a lightweight and breathable feel. It employs the Climaproof membrane which renders weather protection on the trails. It keeps the foot dry while allowing heat and moisture inside to escape.

Reinforcements are placed on the toe and heel areas while TPU welds run along the base of the upper. Aside from enhancing the boot’s durability, these features give extra security on the trails, especially in rock-strewn regions. Webbing loops and metal hooks form part of its lacing system which helps in managing fit. The pull tab at the back of the foot facilitates easy on and off.

Popularity

The current trend of Adidas Terrex Tivid Mid CP.
Compare to another shoe:
Author
Paul Ronto
Paul Ronto

Over the past 20 years, Paul has climbed, hiked, and ran all over the world. He has summited peaks throughout the Americas, trekked through Africa, and tested his endurance in 24-hour trail races as well as 6 marathons. On average, he runs 30-50 miles a week in the foothills of Northern Colorado. His research is regularly cited in The New York Times, Washington Post, National Geographic, etc. On top of this, Paul is leading the running shoe lab where he cuts shoes apart and analyses every detail of the shoes that you might buy.