Adidas Terrex Skychaser LT notable features

The Adidas Terrex Skychaser LT is a footgear capable of delivering a combination of breathable comfort (just like the Terrex AX2R) and versatility on the trail. Its minimalist upper is engineered to withstand abrasive elements.

Its springiness comes from its proprietary midsole, called Boost. This particular midsole allows wearers to make efficient strides thanks to its enhanced energy-return feature.

Size and fit

A fairly true-to-size, low-top everyday shoe for hiking is the Adidas Terrex Skychaser LT. It is offered in regular width in full and half sizes. Users can adjust its fit to their preference thanks to the hiker’s ghillie lacing.

Outsole

With the Terrex Skychaser LT’s Continental rubber outsole, owners are given the ability to plant their feet securely over tricky terrain. It is built capable of producing enough grip on different types of surfaces, be they wet or dry. The C-shaped lugs it comes engineered with allow day travelers to dig deep into loose soil, thereby achieving enhanced footing security.

Midsole

An Adidas-exclusive midsole called Boost is what gives hiking folks ample cushioning underfoot and ground balance in the Terrex Skychaser LT. It is made of thermoplastic polyurethane, a material that is both hardwearing and flexible. Adidas designers topped it with a molded sockliner to give users even more comfort on the trail.

Upper

This Adidas hiker houses the foot in its low-cut upper made of abrasion-resistant mesh fabric. Soft textile lines its interior walls. It comes built with an EVA frame for extra support. Strips of synthetic overlays cover its sides for additional protection against scuffs and scrapes.

The shoe’s lace holes are a combination of fabric loops and plated eyelets. Through them is a heavy-duty lace made up of synthetic cords.

Additional Info

Popularity

The current trend of Adidas Terrex Skychaser LT.
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Author
Paul Ronto
Paul Ronto

Over the past 20 years, Paul has climbed, hiked, and ran all over the world. He has summited peaks throughout the Americas, trekked through Africa, and tested his endurance in 24-hour trail races as well as 6 marathons. On average, he runs 30-50 miles a week in the foothills of Northern Colorado. His research is regularly cited in The New York Times, Washington Post, National Geographic, etc. On top of this, Paul is leading the running shoe lab where he cuts shoes apart and analyses every detail of the shoes that you might buy.