Size and fit

Sizes for both men and women are available for the low-top Adidas Deerupt Runner. According to Adidas, the shoe runs small, and it is recommended for buyers to go at least a half size up than their usual size. It has a flexible knit upper that molds to the foot for comfort. Ankle movement is unrestricted with the low-top collar.

Adidas Deerupt Runner Style

The neat look of the white grid that covers the Adidas Deerupt Runner makes it look futuristic and straightforward. It’s worn well with jeans or shorts, especially during the summer season. Dresses, leggings, skirts, and track pants are also good options. These kicks basically go with anything, adding a stylish accent that pops to any get-up.

Its "toe-down" look was explicitly designed with Instagram picture-taking in mind, making it as fashion-forward as it can be. For a throwback look, ankle socks can be worn with the sneaker, paired with shorts or skirts. The shoe stands out in any outfit and can be mixed and matched with neutral or different colors. It can also be used for any casual occasion, dressed up or down.

Notable Features

The Adidas Deerupt Runner features a minimally styled upper made up of sandwich mesh, which is covered in stretch grid webbing. As a result, the sneaker has a bold look that makes it stand out. It functions as a slip on but has a lace-up closure for added design.

Web wrapping is also incorporated on the simple midsole to continue the geometric look. Completing the elegant appeal of the shoe is the iconic Adidas Trefoil logo, which is stamped on the heel.

Adidas Deerupt Runner History

Adidas founder Adi Dassler was known for having developed spiked running shoes. He was also known for his passion for innovative kicks, traveling far and wide to meet athletes and find out what they needed the most. As a result, Adidas thrived throughout the years and remains an iconic brand with much to offer. Since its launch in 1949, the company has not stopped pursuing what's next in athletic and lifestyle footwear.

For its casual wear department, the brand has established the Adidas Originals line, introducing clothes, shoes, bags, and accessories for men and women. The series has a trademark retro appeal, taking inspiration from the sports styles of the 1940s up to the 1980s. It has the highly recognizable Adidas Trefoil as its primary logo, which is used on heritage products.  

Dipping into their archives again, Adidas introduced the Deerupt Runner in March 2018. Its name comes from the combination of “disrupt” and “erupt.” Its main attractive feature, the webbing that encases the shoe, is inspired by another notable Adidas creation: the grid. It’s a midsole design from the 1970s that was first applied on running shoes.

Back then, the net-like theme was used to stabilize sneakers meant for casual use, long-distance running, and basketball. For the Adidas Deerupt Runner, the net was reinvented and incorporated into an updated silhouette. With web covering, other design elements weren’t needed so that the sneaker could at once be simple and unique. It’s a visually arresting shoe, suited for modern casual wearers.  

Nice to know

  • The EVA midsole is made for lightweight support.
  • Molded into the sockliner is the zoned insole, which provides cushioning and keeps the foot secure.
  • OrthoLite technology is used in the cushioned sockliner for performance and comfort.
  • Subtle and lightweight compression is also offered by the grid webbing which covers the shoe.

Rankings

How Adidas Deerupt Runner ranks compared to all other shoes
Top 34% sneakers
All sneakers
Top 37% Adidas sneakers
All Adidas sneakers
Top 34% low sneakers
All low sneakers

Popularity

The current trend of Adidas Deerupt Runner.
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Author
Danny McLoughlin
Danny McLoughlin

Danny is a sports nut with a particular interest in football and running. He loves to watch sports as much as he loves to play. Danny was lead researcher on RunRepeat and The PFA’s report into Racial Bias in Football Commentary. His football and running research has been featured in The Guardian, BBC, New York Times and Washington Post.