Updates to Timberland Euro Sprint Hiker

  • The modern style of the Timberland Euro Sprint Hiker boot allows it to be worn on casual walks around town and backcountry hikes. Its leather upper has a lining made of 50% PET or recycled plastic bottles.
  • The brand designers equipped this mid-cut day hiking boot with an ethylene-vinyl acetate (EVA) midsole for lightweight cushioning. For a grippy and stable ride, it sports a rubber outsole partially made of recycled materials.

Size and fit

A men’s-only Timberland hiking boot, the Euro Sprint Hiker comes in full and half sizes. It is offered in standard width and reasonably runs true to size. It has a traditional lace-up closure that allows users to customize the fit.

Outsole

The outsole of this mid-cut hiking boot is made of 15% recycled rubber. The large lugs on the sides provide stability while the circular boots on the center provide 360-degree traction. Its textured appearance prevents muck build-up.

Midsole

The Timberland Euro Sprint Hiker boots have an ethylene-vinyl acetate or EVA midsole. This foam is a rubber-like material which grants shock absorption and cushioning.

Upper

The nubuck leather upper of this day hiking boot protects hikers from outdoor obstacles. It has a breathable lining which helps keep a fresh, in-shoe feel. Comfort is enhanced through its cushioned tongue and collar.

For fit management, its lacing system includes a round lace and metal loops. Additionally, a lace keeper maintains the upright position of the tongue to prevent unwanted friction.

Rankings

How Timberland Euro Sprint Hiker ranks compared to all other shoes
Top 5% hiking boots
All hiking boots
Top 8% Timberland hiking boots
All Timberland hiking boots
Top 4% day hiking hiking boots
All day hiking hiking boots

Popularity

The current trend of Timberland Euro Sprint Hiker.
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Author
Paul Ronto
Paul Ronto

Over the past 20 years, Paul has climbed, hiked, and ran all over the world. He has summited peaks throughout the Americas, trekked through Africa, and tested his endurance in 24-hour trail races as well as 6 marathons. On average, he runs 30-50 miles a week in the foothills of Northern Colorado. His research is regularly cited in The New York Times, Washington Post, National Geographic, etc. On top of this, Paul is leading the running shoe lab where he cuts shoes apart and analyses every detail of the shoes that you might buy.