Who should buy The North Face Vectiv Exploris Mid Futurelight

The Vectiv Exploris Mid Futurelight promises ninja-like traversal prowess without sacrificing grip and protection. Buy it if:

  • You're interested in hiking boots that specialize in forward momentum.
  • Kicks that adapt quite well to shifting weather conditions are what you need.
  • You want a boot whose outsole bites into loose and rocky terrain effortlessly.

The North Face Vectiv Exploris Mid Futurelight buy

Who should NOT buy it

If you want a more durable boot, trade the featured hiker for the non-waterproof Altra Lone Peak Hiker. And with no reported issues concerning fit, the Danner Mountain 600 is a mighty fine alternative to the Vectiv Exploris Mid Futurelight.

The North Face Vectiv Exploris Mid Futurelight nobuya

10/10 tenacity in every pair

Numerous hikers are simply stunned by the stickiness of the Vectiv Exploris Mid Futurelight. Because of its high level of tenacity, one adventurer says that "going uphill saves your calves," whether you're negotiating rocky/icy slopes or grassy hills.

The North Face Vectiv Exploris Mid Futurelight gripa

Vectiv Exploris Mid Futurelight equals day-one comfort

From "It felt like some of my trail running shoes" to "the most comfortable boot I've ever worn," this kick from The North Face is hailed by many reviewers as immensely plush all over. And the even better news? The boot's generosity on the comfort front doesn't require a break-in period!

The North Face Vectiv Exploris Mid Futurelight comf

Keeps gait in check

There are those who are deeply impressed with the Vectiv Exploris Mid Futurelight's great support system (ankle + arch). It "absolutely decreases foot fatigue," says one of the testers. Another one says, "climbing up and down the trail was a breeze" in this TNF hiker.

The North Face Vectiv Exploris Mid Futurelight suppa

Questionable upper durability

Most reviewers who gave the featured kick lower ratings describe the boot's upper as "not reliable." According to them, the shoe's Cordura shell blows out way too soon at the seams. There are also those who say that "it's just not rugged enough," believing that TNF can "remake the Vectiv Exploris Mids into a beast" if they want to.

The North Face Vectiv Exploris Mid Futurelight dura

Doozy in the summer

Unlike most waterproof hiking boots, the Vectiv Exploris Mid Futurelight from TNF is "great on hot days," according to a decent number of trail-goers.

The North Face Vectiv Exploris Mid Futurelight breath

Lightness is the future

Experts and non-professional reviewers agree that this hiker is very lightweight. One of them even went as far as saying that it's "the best lightweight hiking shoe" in his collection. Their praises are also backed by data, as the Vectiv Exploris Mid Futurelight is 153 g lighter than the average weight of hiking boots, which is 539 g per piece.

The North Face Vectiv Exploris Mid Futurelight lightb

Cozy on chilly days

There are those who are quite floored by the boot's warming capability (despite it not having proper insulation). One tester among them says that, in sub-35°F temps, "it's surprisingly warm." There was also someone who went on a week-long trip to Iceland and got super-impressed with its coziness.

The North Face Vectiv Exploris Mid Futurelight warm

Cramped toes in The North Face Vectiv Exploris Mid Futurelight

About a handful of hikers find the Vectiv Exploris Mid Futurelight narrow in the toe area. According to one user reviewer, the shoe "puts severe pressure" on his left pinky toe every time he has the boot on.

Facts / Specs

Weight: Men 14.7oz / Women 12.6oz
Use: Day Hiking, Speed Hiking
Cut: Mid cut
Features: Lightweight / Eco-friendly / Orthotic friendly / Removable insole
Waterproofing: Waterproof
Width: Normal
BRAND Brand: The North Face

Compare popularity Interactive

Compare the popularity of another shoe to The North Face Vectiv Exploris Mid Futurelight:

The North Face Vectiv Exploris Mid Futurelight video reviews

Author
Paul Ronto
Paul Ronto

Over the past 20 years, Paul has climbed, hiked, and ran all over the world. He has summited peaks throughout the Americas, trekked through Africa, and tested his endurance in 24-hour trail races as well as 6 marathons. On average, he runs 30-50 miles a week in the foothills of Northern Colorado. His research is regularly cited in The New York Times, Washington Post, National Geographic, etc. On top of this, Paul is leading the running shoe lab where he cuts shoes apart and analyses every detail of the shoes that you might buy.