Who should buy The North Face Vectiv Exploris Futurelight

Built with athleticism in mind, the Vectiv Exploris Futurelight from The North Face translates to bigger strides without too much effort. Purchase it if:

  • You're looking for a shoe that can help you transition from trail runners to hikers.
  • Pointy hazards (think gnarly roots and sharp rocks) are common on your go-to trail.
  • You wish to make your arches worry less about aches and pains after a long hike.

The North Face Vectiv Exploris Futurelight buy

Who should NOT buy it

If you want something less conspicuous looks-wise and not as expensive, check out the Salomon Outline GTX instead. Also, skip the Vectiv Exploris Futurelight for the Adidas Terrex Swift R3 GTX if balance is a big deal to you.

The North Face Vectiv Exploris Futurelight no

Supportive around the arch

The Vectiv Exploris Futurelight "does an excellent job minimizing fatigue," says a professional gear tester. She, someone who has weak arches, didn't feel the need to buy custom footbeds as the stock ones are already quite supportive.

The North Face Vectiv Exploris Futurelight suppa

The Vectiv Exploris Futurelight's brilliant grip

Footwear pundits are convinced that The North Face Vectiv Exploris Futurelight is "second to none" when it comes to grip. "Not once did I feel as though I was at risk," says one of them, referring to the outsole's tenacity in sloppy conditions (think slick wooden bridges and slippery roots) in the Washington Hoh Rainforest.

The North Face Vectiv Exploris Futurelight grip

Locks out wetness

Based on professional reviews, the Vectiv Exploris Futurelight is super waterproof. One of its testers emerged dry every time from shallow creeks and streams.

The North Face Vectiv Exploris Futurelight water

Could be more stable

One of the few criticisms about the TNF Vectiv Exploris Futurelight has something to do with the shoe's subpar stability. One professional reviewer blames it on the hiker's banana-shaped sole unit, calling it "slightly tippy," while another is more direct, saying that it's "hard to trust."

The North Face Vectiv Exploris Futurelight stab

The North Face Vectiv Exploris Futurelight equals outlandish

The shoe's "futuristic styling is polarizing" to a professional blogger. Another critic agrees, saying that it's not his "first choice for wearing around town."

The North Face Vectiv Exploris Futurelight outland

Boosted strides in every pair

"Well-tuned for fast-and-light hiking" is how a gear maven finds the Vectiv Exploris Futurelight. Another professional tester also describes the shoe as "unapologetically focused on forward propulsion."

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Comfy hikes in the Vectiv Exploris Futurelight

With comments like "surprisingly comfortable" and "ensures every footfall is cushioned," it is quite telling that reviewers are quite impressed with the featured shoe on the comfort front.

The North Face Vectiv Exploris Futurelight comf

Shield-like underfoot

The Vectiv Exploris Futurelight provides remarkable protection from sharp roots and rocks, based on professional reviews. "My feet felt very well-protected" on its springy-yet-resilient sole unit, said one expert.

The North Face Vectiv Exploris Futurelight protect

A demanding asking price

At $159 a pop, The North Face Vectiv Exploris Futurelight is quite expensive. Case in point: in the hiking world, anything beyond $140 is considered pricey.

The North Face Vectiv Exploris Futurelight pricey

Facts / Specs

Weight: Men 13.2oz / Women 11.3oz
Use: Day Hiking, Speed Hiking
Cut: Low cut
Features: Lightweight / Eco-friendly / Orthotic friendly / Removable insole
Waterproofing: Waterproof
Width: Normal
BRAND Brand: The North Face

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Author
Paul Ronto
Paul Ronto

Over the past 20 years, Paul has climbed, hiked, and ran all over the world. He has summited peaks throughout the Americas, trekked through Africa, and tested his endurance in 24-hour trail races as well as 6 marathons. On average, he runs 30-50 miles a week in the foothills of Northern Colorado. His research is regularly cited in The New York Times, Washington Post, National Geographic, etc. On top of this, Paul is leading the running shoe lab where he cuts shoes apart and analyses every detail of the shoes that you might buy.