Facts

  • Terrain

    Road

    Shoes best for road, track and light gravel. See the best road shoes.

    Trail

    Shoes best for trail, off road, mountains and other unstable surfaces. See the best trail shoes.

    Good to know

    As long as you stick to the road or path, and if you want just one running shoe, buy a road running shoe.

  • Arch support

    Neutral / cushion / high arch

    Shoes for runners who do not need any additional arch support (Around 50% of runners). Best for people with normal, high or medium high arches. See the best neutral shoes.

    Stability / overpronation / normal arch

    Shoes for runners who need mild to moderate arch support (Around 45% of runners). Best for runners with a low arch. See the best stability shoes.

    Motion control / severe overpronation / flat feet

    Shoes for runners who needs a lot of arch support. Best for runners with flat feet. See the best motion control shoes.

    Good to know

    - Rule of thumb: If in doubt, buy neutral shoes to avoid injuries.
    - More about arch support in this video.
    - Find your arch type by following steps from this video.

  • Use

    Daily running

    Cushioned shoes for your daily easy running. Great comfort. See best shoes for daily running.

    Competition

    Lightweight shoes good for races, interval training, tempo runs and fartlek. Here are the best competition running shoes.

    Good to know

    If you want just one pair of shoes, buy a shoe for daily running.

  • Price
    $120
  • Weight
    Men: 7.9oz
    Women: 6.7oz
  • Heel to toe drop
    Men: 4mm
    Women: 4mm

    The height difference from the heel to the forefoot, also known as heel drop, toe spring, heel to toe spring or simply drop.

    There are many opinions about what a good heel drop is. We do not recommend any in particular. Lean more in this video.

  • Heel height
    Men: 26mm
    Women: 26mm
  • Forefoot height
    Men: 22mm
    Women: 22mm
  • Width
    Men: Normal
    Women: Normal
  • Release date
    Unknown
Show more facts

Rankings

Expert Reviews

Experts are runners, who post reviews at youtube, directly at RunRepeat or at their own websites. Each expert is categorized from level 1 to level 5 based on expertise. See stats on expert reviews and how we calculate scores here.

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77 / 100 based on 3 expert reviews

  • 75 / 100 | Marijke van den Hamer

    Skechers MaxRoad 3 Ultra - Not as ultra as one might hope

    More photos

    The Skechers MaxRoad 3 has a bit of a complex history. Normally, if a shoe company has a successful model, they won’t change too much between the different versions.

    Take Nike for example, if they make a second version of a shoe they’ll change something about the upper or the sole, but not both at the same time. Thus, if they change something in the upper in version two, they’ll tweak the sole in version three. However, that isn’t the case with the Skechers Ultra series.

    They have changed quite a bit about this shoe in the last few years. The Skechers GORun MaxRoad 3 Ultra are, as the name suggests, the third model in the Ultra Road series.

    They have changed the name slightly, because they originate from the GORun Ultra Road and the GORun Ultra Road 2.

    And before that it used to be just the GoRun Ultra, before they split it into two separate models by making a road and trail version of the shoe. That the name now has Max and Ultra in the name, seems a bit unnecessary to me.

     

     

    The MaxRoad 3 Ultra is a neutral and maximalist running shoe. Like most of the Skechers Performance line it has a 4mm drop with a 26mm heel height and a 22mm forefoot height.

    It’s a light shoe, especially for a maximalist shoe, only weighing 224 grams. Slightly lighter than the Ultra Road, but it also has less stack height than the Ultra Road, so that’s probably how they reduced the weight.

     

     

    I’ve owned most of the previous versions of this shoe, including the GORun Ultra Road, but I abandoned that shoe because I really didn’t like the upper and I found that the sole wasn’t flexible and cushioned enough for a maximalist shoe.

    But the MaxRoad 3 is made with a different midsole material, or they just renamed it (I’m not entirely sure), so I decided to give it a go.

    Upper

    The upper is made out of a flat knit seamless upper, but around the toe box it isn’t a finely knit fabric like most knitted uppers and the fabric on the toe box isn’t very stretchy either.

     

     

    Although it is a knit upper, the lack of flexibility in the toe box creates a hotspot on top of my toes where the fabric creases during toe-off. The heel and collar are slightly padded, but the toe box is just a single layer of knit fabric.

    Midsole

    The midsole is made out of very light weight Ultra Flight material. It is quite plush, but the energy return isn’t that high.

     

     

    The MaxRoad 3 has the M-strike technology that helps you land more on your midfoot and together with the rocker shape of the sole it even pushes you a little bit more towards a forefoot landing.

    The midsole also has the same drainage technology as used in the Skechers GoTrail Ultra 4, which I found very effective.

    Outsole

    The outsole consists of a thin layer of rubber in a spider web pattern underneath the forefoot and underneath the heel.

     

     

    The midfoot does not contain any rubber and is just exposed Ultra Flight material. The outsole does provide enough traction on wet roads. Something I didn’t really expect due to the lack of profile on the outsole.

    Performance

    The sole is quite flexible, partially due to the flexibility grooves on the lateral and medial side of the forefoot, but the flexibility in the forefoot is actually limited by the stiffness of the knit fabric of the upper rather than by the stack height of this shoe.

     

     

    The first few kilometers in this shoe were a bit uncomfortable in this shoe, but over time the shoe became a bit more plush and comfortable.

    Every time I put this shoe on for a run I had trouble remembering why I didn’t like this shoe that much until I would hit the 10k point in my run and the hotspots would come back and I’d all of a sudden remember why I didn’t really like the shoe.

    In previous Skechers Performance models, the durability of the outsole could be an issue, but the rubber outsole of the MaxRoad 3 is pretty durable.

     

    Conclusion

    I didn’t have very high expectations of this shoe since I didn’t like the first version of this shoe, so I had my doubts about the third version.

    I had sort of hoped that since they’ve changed the shoe quite a bit that I would like the third version of this model, but I don’t. Although I do find the midsole to be quite plush, my biggest objection with this model is still there, the uncomfortable upper.

    However, I am looking forward to the 4th version of this shoe, since rumour has it that they will have the new Skechers Hyper Burst foam and hopefully they’ll fix the upper as well.

    This expert has been verified by RunRepeat. Reviews are neutral, unbiased and based on extensive testing.

  • 95 / 100 | AFS | Level 1 expert

    It's definitely less expensive and it's an incredibly high-quality shoe.

  • 68 / 100 | Doctors of Running | | Level 1 expert

    This shoe is definitely worth a look, especially to experience the ULTRA FLIGHT midsole.

  • First look | AFS | Level 1 expert

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  • The Skechers GOrun MaxRoad 3 Ultra is a running shoe that’s designed for those who appreciate the supportive benefits of max cushioning systems and configurations optimized for contests and extended running sessions. It serves as the successor to the GOrun Ultra Road series, employing a lighter and more streamlined design to appeal to modern tastes.
  • Underfoot cushioning is the responsibility of the full-length ULTRA FLIGHT™. This foam has a substantial thickness to support the foot properly and to receive the full brunt of the forces generated by the striking phase. A knitted fabric serves as the upper unit and it’s created to be more breathable than the ones used in other Skechers running shoes.

Standard sizing methods were used during the conception of the Skechers GOrun MaxRoad 3 Ultra. Runners are welcome to utilize their usual choices of size when making a purchase decision. However, it is generally recommended to test the shoe first to achieve a pleasant in-shoe hug.

When it comes to width, the available options are D - Medium and B - Medium for men and women, respectively. Low to medium foot volumes are the ones that are welcome to test this product.

The high-wear areas of the heel and forefoot of the Skechers GOrun MaxRoad 3 Ultra are covered with rubber. This layer serves as a protective shield against the abrasive nature of the surfaces. Also, rubber has a naturally grippy characteristic which allows it to adhere to the ground with ease.

Flex grooves line the forefoot section of the external pad. These shallow channels are designed to allow the natural movement capacity of the toe joints. The forefoot lift is the action that benefits the most from such inclusion as it is the part of the gait cycle that involves bending the most.

The midsole unit of the Skechers GOrun MaxRoad 3 Ultra is made of ULTRA FLIGHT™, a full-length cushioning unit that offers shock attenuation, energy transfer, and lightweight response. This foam also is also made to be durable enough to handle extended running sessions.

The M-Strike is a Skechers technology which entails a midfoot section that slightly curved outwards. Such a scheme encourages midfoot striking, a stepping method that is touted to be more efficient and less straining on the foot than the full heel-to-toe motion.

A knitted fabric serves as the upper unit of the Skechers GOrun MaxRoad 3 Ultra. This cloth-like material is tasked with hugging the foot and keeping it secure. It has small breathing holes to permit the flow of air into the interior chamber, thereby maintaining a cool and dry coverage. Knitted uppers are popular features that grace many of today’s running footwear, including the well-received Nike Epic React Flyknit line.

Synthetic prints reinforce the instep and the sides of this running shoe. These add-ons are meant to bolster the durability of the facade. They also help the lacing system when it comes to securing the foot in place and staving off in-shoe wobbling.

A traditional lacing system graces the instep. This feature adjusts the tightness or looseness of the wrap. Print-reinforced discreet eyelets are the portals through which flat laces crisscross. The familiarity of the fit modifying method can allow for precise customization.

A finger loop is stitched onto the back of the shoe. This tab helps the runner to widen the opening of the upper, thereby easily facilitating the foot into, and out of, the interior chamber.

The padded tongue and collar cushion the ankles, the heel and the bridge of the foot. These parts of the silhouette also aim to prevent the foot from slipping off the interior unintentionally.

Comparison