Summary

We spent 6.7 hours reading reviews from experts and users. In summary, this is what runners think:

5 reasons to buy

  • The Saucony Triumph ISO 4 looked appealing, based on some consumers’ responses.
  • Several runners mentioned that the shoe is comfortable enough even when worn for long hours.
  • Some users mentioned that the shoe offers a good amount of breathability even on warm running conditions. 
  • The shoe feels light and fast, said a few wearers.
  • The shoe runs true to size.

2 reasons not to buy

  • Several testers complained that the fit was too narrow in the forefoot and midfoot sections.
  • The shoe is expensive.

Bottom line

The Saucony Triumph ISO 4 received mostly negative reviews from those who have tested it. People were shocked that it gave such a stiff ride and an uncomfortably narrow in-shoe experience. They expected more out of it as it’s an update to one of the up-and-coming series of footwear that’s garnered a fan base. The restructured design was welcomed by some, but that’s just about the only positive feedback about this road shoe.

Facts

Rankings

A top rated Road running shoe
A popular pick
Better rated than the previous version Saucony Triumph ISO 3

Expert Reviews

87 / 100 based on 6 expert reviews

  • 85 / 100 | Road Runner Sports | | Level 4 expert

    Overall, the Saucony Triumph ISO 4 provides your run with bounce and comfort.

  • 85 / 100 | SBRsport | Level 1 expert

    Saucony managed to create this with very very soft and yet the shoe is surprisingly stable.

  • 96 / 100 | Road Trail Run | | Level 5 expert

    It is supportive and stable, very well cushioned without being sloppy and mushy as some in the class, and has a comfortable upper that can accommodate many foot shapes.

  • 79 / 100 | Solereview | Level 5 expert

    If the Triumph ISO 3 was the equivalent of a cozy recliner, then the ISO 4 has the business-like personality of an office chair. The full-length Everun midsole is firmer and the upper has a snugger fit.

  • 100 / 100 | Running Shoes Guru | | Level 2 expert

    Overall, the Saucony Triumph ISO 4 is one of the best maximum cushioned shoes in which I have run. The combination of technologies mix to the point where these shoes feel like a true culmination of their designs.

  • 80 / 100 | TriathlonLars | | Level 2 expert

    After these initial first runs, I will be focusing more on using the Triumph [ISO 4] for slower and longer runs, as this is clearly where it is most capable. Both the narrow toe box and the arch support are issues I will follow up on and consider moving forward.

Become an expert
  • The Saucony Triumph ISO 4 is a running shoe that’s created for the neutral pronator. It features an updated design that moves away from the layered look of its predecessor, the Triumph ISO 3. Instead of using separate layers of overlays, this one has the printed variety. It’s directly fused with the cloth-like mesh upper, giving a smooth and seamless façade.
  • The midsole unit makes use of the EVERUN, a foam compound that aims to provide cushioning and shock attenuation. A Topsole that’s created from the same technology has the purpose of gracing the runner with a soft underfoot experience. Rubber compounds shield the sole unit from the abrasive nature of the asphalt.

The Saucony Triumph ISO 4 has a standard running shoe length. It comes in sizes that follow the preferences of consumers. For the men’s version, the available widths are D – Medium and 2E – Wide; for the women’s version, it’s B – Medium and D – Wide. Other wide running shoes are also offered by Saucony. The semi-curved shape of this product mimics the curve of the human foot.

XT-900 is made from carbon rubber. It’s created to provide responsible traction over the surfaces. It’s also made to last long because it acts as a shield against wear and tear. It’s placed throughout the length of the s Saucony Triumph ISO 4.

IBR+ or Injection Blown Rubber is a lightweight compound that’s added to the forefoot section. Its responsive nature allows it to give additional cushioning and springiness to each step. It’s flexible, as well.

The Tri-Flex design is a network of grooves and patterns on the outsole that permits the flexibility of the wearer’s foot.

EVERUN is a foam unit that runs the entire length of the Saucony Triumph ISO 4. It carries the foot throughout the running session, cushioning it with every step. It also aims to absorb impact shock and disperse the resulting energy, potentially maintaining comfort as the runner goes through the gait cycle. This midsole foam is also utilized in the Triumph ISO 5.

An EVERUN Topsole is placed right above the foam that is more substantial in thickness. Its purpose is to immediately cushion the underfoot, supporting it and energizing each step.

The High Elasticity Sockliner provides a little more cushioning and flexibility. It has tiny pores that allow air to circulate in the foot-chamber.

Engineered Mesh has the properties of woven cloth. It wraps around the foot like a sock, preventing or reducing irritation in the process. It has ventilation apertures that allow air into the foot-chamber to keep the wearer cool and dry when running.

ISOFIT is a system that uses stretchable mesh and thin synthetic overlays. They’re patterned across the midfoot and heel sections, with the goal of providing a snug and secure fit. They connect directly to the lacing system, so they adjust in conjunction with the tightening or loosening of the shoelaces.

The RUNDRY Collar Lining is made up of fabric that hugs the heel and ankles. It’s formed to have a soft and smooth disposition. It has a moisture wicking capacity that prevents odor and the buildup of bacteria.

The padded tongue and collar hold the foot in place and prevent it from wobbling inside the Saucony Triumph ISO 4 during the run. They also prevent unintentional shoe-removals.

Author
Jens Jakob Andersen
Jens Jakob Andersen

Jens Jakob is a fan of short distances with a 5K PR at 15:58 minutes. Based on 35 million race results, he's among the fastest 0.2% runners. Jens Jakob previously owned a running store, when he was also a competitive runner. His work is regularly featured in The New York Times, Washington Post, BBC and the likes as well as peer-reviewed journals. Finally, he has been a guest on +30 podcasts on running.

jens@runrepeat.com