Who should buy the Salomon Alphacross 3

The Alphacross 3 from Salomon is a great choice for: 

  • runners new to trail running who want versatile traction 
  • seasoned trail runners who want a low-to-the-ground feel 
  • those who want an energetic ride 
  • medium to wide-footed runners who like a supportive fit and stable ride on uneven surfaces
  • trail runners who want a trail shoe that can double for hiking

Salomon Alphacross 3 salomon alphacross 3

Who should NOT buy it

If you're looking to set PRs, you might want to consider the speed-oriented Salomon Wildcross or the Salomon Sense Pro 4 instead of the Salomon Alphacross 3. 

And if you want a Salomon trail shoe that offers a snug fit, check out Salomon Ultra Glide.

Salomon Alphacross 3 salomon alphacross

Salomon Alphacross 3 vs. 2

Only the fit of the Alphacross is updated in the third iteration. It's made snugger for a more precise wrap. 

Salomon Alphacross 3 fit

Clings like claws

Whether it's on muddy, soft, steep ascents and descents, hard-packed trails, and hilly terrain, the Salomon Alphacross 3 has a solid grip, reported multiple experts. 

Salomon Alphacross 3 traction

Even during sharp turns, there are no missteps in the Alphacross. 

This shoe comes to life

"Bouncy" and "responsive" is how the majority find this shoe. According to them, it's energetic; they don't have to expend much energy to get to the next step. 

Salomon Alphacross 3 cushion

Just the right amount of cushion

It's neither too much nor too minimal that you lose the sense of the ground. Because of the ground feel it delivers, this shoe maximizes control, especially on uneven terrains. 

Salomon Alphacross 3 ground feel

On top of this, the midsole balances rigidity and softness very well; trail runners say that their feet and legs don't feel beat-up. 

It fits like a glove!

Runners with medium to wide feet all agree that the upper does a "great job" locking the foot in place. It's pliable and form-fitting; it mimics the shape the size of the foot. 

Salomon Alphacross 3 lockdown

The tongue and heel collar also sit higher than usual, meaning there's a lot of support around the ankles. So much so, there are no reports of slips even when cornering. 

Just enough space for the toes to splay

The forefoot is very spacious, as per various testers. Their toes can splay comfortably and the shoe doesn't feel constricting when the foot starts to swell. 

Salomon Alphacross 3 toe box

Doesn't tip the scales

Although very slightly above average at 10.6 oz in US M9 (vs. the average 10.5 oz in trail shoes), many still find the Salomon Alphacross 3 "lightweight." 

Salomon Alphacross 3 lightweight

Loyal Salomon trail runners even commend it for weighing less than its sibling — the Speedcross 5 (11.6 oz). 

The Salomon Alphacross 3 is pocket-friendly

For $90, it's on the roster of Salomon's cheapest trail shoes. On average, Salomon trail shoes retail for $140, while the cheapest ones fall in the sub $100 category. 

Not for narrow feet

Those with slim feet share that they had to cinch the laces down and tie them to the last eyelet to "feel secure" in the Alphacross 3. 

Salomon Alphacross 3 salomon

On top of this, they also find the forefoot "too roomy" for their liking. 

Durability is a miss

The tongue and the outsole are a bust in terms of strength. The tongue has poor sewing that made it rip after a couple of miles. Meanwhile, the outsole already has excessive wear after less than 100 miles. 

Salomon Alphacross 3 durability

Facts / Specs

Terrain: Trail
Weight: Men 10.6oz / Women 9oz
Drop: 10mm
Arch support: Neutral
Forefoot height: 24.3mm
Heel height: 34.3mm
Pronation: Neutral Pronation / Supination / Underpronation

Compare popularity Interactive

Compare the popularity of another shoe to Salomon Alphacross 3:
Author
Jens Jakob Andersen
Jens Jakob Andersen

Jens Jakob is a fan of short distances with a 5K PR at 15:58 minutes. Based on 35 million race results, he's among the fastest 0.2% runners. Jens Jakob previously owned a running store, when he was also a competitive runner. His work is regularly featured in The New York Times, Washington Post, BBC and the likes as well as peer-reviewed journals. Finally, he has been a guest on +30 podcasts on running.