Summary

We spent 9.4 hours reading reviews from experts and users. In summary, this is what runners think:

9 reasons to buy

  • Comfort stands out in the Hexaffect Run 3 as noted by quite a number of runners.
  • The budget-friendly price is one big reason why the shoe is such a great option for runners of all levels.
  • Reebok’s Hexaffect Run 3.0 lasts for a reasonably long time, according to several comments.
  • A sizeable number of runners coveted the trendy style and design as it is a superb choice for casual wear.
  • A new mesh upper makes the shoe more breathable than ever.
  • It is very flexible.
  • The Hexaffect Run 3.0 is lighter than past versions.
  • Reebok designed the shoe with a low-cut feature for maximum mobility.
  • The removable insole can be swapped for custom orthotics.

2 reasons not to buy

  • A few runners found the grip on wet surfaces a bit of a challenge.
  • Some runners wished for better cushioning in a moderately light trainer.

Bottom line

The Hexaffect Run 3.0 is Reebok’s way of showing that budget-friendly shoes can also be exceptional. Most runners agree that this is a fantastic shoe in almost every way, particularly its comfort, arch support, breathability, and flexibility. While this is originally designed for entry-level runners, even seasoned ones can easily fall in love with this shoe.

Facts

Update:
Terrain: Road
Arch support: Neutral
Weight: Men: 9.7oz | Women: 9.2oz
Heel to toe drop: Men: 8mm | Women: 8mm
Pronation: Neutral Pronation
Arch type: High arch
Use: Jogging
Strike Pattern: Midfoot strike
Distance: Daily running | Long distance | Marathon
Brand: Reebok
Type: Low drop
Width: Men: Normal | Women: Normal
Price: $70
Colorways: Blue, Grey, Orange
Size
Small True to size Large
See more facts

  • Reebok does a major facelift in the upper of the Hexaffect Run 3.0. The latest model features a new honeycomb mesh upper with bigger holes to take breathability to another level. Runners will enjoy cool and sweat-free runs every time they take the road.
  • The major overlays are replaced by a midfoot cage that features loops where the laces now go through. These loops can be clearly seen as connected to the sole to enhance cinching or for a more secure fit.
  • The tongue is now more padded, which should improve the shoe’s already great comfort while rounded and textured laces take the place of the flat ones of the past version. Reebok guarantees that these laces are more handy when getting the right fit and will not come undone midway into the run.

The Hexaffect Run 3.0 is a great fit for runners with regular foot width like the past model. It has sufficient space in the heel and forefoot without feeling sloppy while the midfoot is very snug. The standard widths of D for the men’s and B for the women’s are available. The shoe length is true to size. 6 to 13 are the options for the men while the women can choose sizes from 4 to 11.


The outsole is made up largely of standard carbon rubber for proven durability. It also features nodes built in hexagonal patterns for enhanced support and flexibility, hence the name Hexaffect. The nodes also do their part in helping in the cushioning and the shock attenuation abilities of the shoe.


The Memory Tech foam is the main feature in the midsole. It is primarily designed to handle the cushioning and shock-absorbing features of the Hexaffect Run 3.0.


The upper is covered in new honeycomb mesh for the large part. It makes the shoe very breathable. A heel pull tab allows easy on and off maneuver. The new rounded laces go through the loops of a new rib cage. This will enhance the personalized fit and security of the foot. A Memory Tech removable insole enhances comfort and can be exchanged for customized orthotics.

Comparison

Author
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Jens Jakob Andersen

Jens Jakob is a fan of short distances with a 5K PR at 15:58 minutes. Based on 35 million race results, he's among the fastest 0.2% runners. Jens Jakob previously owned a running store, when he was also a competitive runner. His work is regularly featured in The New York Times, Washington Post, BBC and the likes as well as peer-reviewed journals. Finally, he has been a guest on +30 podcasts on running.

jens@runrepeat.com