Summary

We spent 6.8 hours reading reviews from experts and users. In summary, this is what training geeks think:

5 reasons to buy

  • According to a majority of owners, the Nike In-Season TR 8 is comfy for gym use and long periods of standing and walking.
  • The top provides perfect lockdown and lateral support, as stated by many wearers.
  • The lightweight nature of this training shoe is appreciated by a bunch of people because their feet don’t feel dragged down at the end of a long day.
  • The sleek design of this footwear appeals to numerous shoppers.
  • Several individuals with bunions and other foot ailments claim that this product doesn’t aggravate their condition.

2 reasons not to buy

  • Some people have noted that the seams inside tore after two months of regular use.
  • The heel feels loose, says a few users.

Bottom line

The revamped look of the Nike In-Season TR 8 is much lauded by Nike fans. Owners enjoy using it for their daily workouts because of the support afforded by the Flywire. Though it may not be as durable as some have expected of Nike trainers, it still comes highly recommended as a workout shoe or even for running errands.

Facts

Rankings

A top rated Nike training shoe
Better rated than the previous version Nike In-Season TR 9

Expert Reviews

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The In-Season TR model saw a complete overhaul, starting with the silhouette of the trainer. 

The open-cell mesh of the previous iteration has been replaced with tightly-woven fabric.

Flyware cables are still present but have been moved to the middle of the midfoot for better lateral support.

Who is it for? This pair of Nike training shoes is suited for anyone, regardless of where they are in their fitness journey. 

What is it for? The Nike In-Season TR 8 is crafted to support movements of high-intensity interval training. It is also suitable for those doing light exercises or for quick runs.

Traction. The sole unit of the Nike In-Season TR 8 is the same as the one used on the previous model. It features an exposed midsole, but high-wear areas are protected by rubber pods. The cuboidal traction pods are meant to provide multi-direction grip.

Flexibility. Flex grooves are placed in the forefoot section. They enhance the pliability of the material and aids in the smooth heel-to-toe transition of the foot.

Shock-absorption. The heel of this workout shoe is concaved. The hollow portion helps dull the impact during heel landings.

Cushioning. The In-Season TR 8 uses a dual-density foam. The outer layer is rigid and durable to protect the softer core. This construction aids in attenuating shock and keeping the foot steady.

Comfort. A soft foam insole lines the inside of the Nike In-Season TR 8. This layer cradles the foot, preventing in-shoe slippage and helps dull impact when it hits the ground.

Coverage. A tightly-woven mesh makes up the vamp and the heel of the Nike In-Season TR 8. This fabric helps with foot containment.

Meanwhile, a different type of mesh is used on the midfoot panel of this training shoe. The material aids in keeping the interior fresh.

The inside is lined with a soft textile. The fabric aids in wicking moisture and breathability.

Design. Synthetic overlays are used on the midfoot and heel section of the upper. They add style to the top, but they also serve in securing the foot.

Lockdown. A traditional lacing system is used on this Nike trainer. It allows wearers to adjust the fit according to their needs.

Flywire cables are incorporated in the two middle sets of eyelets. The strings heighten the midfoot support when the shoestrings are cinched.

Fit. The collar and the tongue are both lined with plush foam. The soft elements protect against abrasion and prevent excessive movement of the foot.

Author
Nicholas Rizzo
Nicholas Rizzo

Nick is a powerlifter who believes cardio comes in the form of more heavy ass squats. Based on over 1.5 million lifts done at competitions, his PRs place him as an elite level powerlifter. His PRs have him sitting in the top 2% of bench presses (395 lbs), top 3% of squats (485 lbs) and top 6% of deadlifts (515 lbs) for his weight and age. His work has been featured on Forbes, Bodybuilding.com, Elite Daily and the like. Collaborating along the way with industry leaders like Michael Yessis, Mark Rippetoe, Carlo Buzzichelli, Dave Tate, Ray Williams, and Joel Seedman.

nick@runrepeat.com