Who should buy the Nike In-Season TR 8

The Nike In-Season TR 8 is crafted to support movements of high-intensity interval training. More importantly, it is suited for anyone regardless of where they are in their fitness journey. This Nike pair is a solid choice if: 

  • Your day-to-day activities or your job requires you to be on your feet for several hours, and you need a shoe that offers comfort even after prolonged hours of use. 
  • You suffer from bunions and are after a pair that would not be bad for your foot condition. 
  • You prefer a shoe that could keep your foot cool and dry as you go about working out intensely in warn environments. 

Nike In-Season TR 8 Nike Logo

Updates to the Nike In-Season TR 8

  • The In-Season TR model saw a complete overhaul, starting with the silhouette of the trainer. 
  • The open-cell mesh of the previous iteration has been replaced with tightly-woven fabric.
  • Flyware cables are still present but have been moved to the middle of the midfoot for better lateral support.

Nike In-Season TR 8 Updates

The Nike In-Season TR 8's outsole

The sole unit of the Nike In-Season TR 8 is the same as the one used on the previous model. It features an exposed midsole, but high-wear areas are protected by rubber pods. The cuboidal traction pods are meant to provide multi-direction grip.

Nike In-Season TR 8 Outsole3

Flexible forefoot

Flex grooves are placed in the forefoot section. They enhance the pliability of the material and aids in the smooth heel-to-toe transition of the foot.

Nike In-Season TR 8 Outsole4

Shock-absorption

The heel of this workout shoe is concaved. The hollow portion helps dull the impact during heel landings.

Nike In-Season TR 8 Outsole6

Shock attenuation

The In-Season TR 8 uses a dual-density foam. The outer layer is rigid and durable to protect the softer core. This construction aids in attenuating shock and keeping the foot steady.

Nike In-Season TR 8 Midsole1

Anti-slippage

A soft foam insole lines the inside of the Nike In-Season TR 8. This layer cradles the foot, preventing in-shoe slippage and helps dull impact when it hits the ground.

Nike In-Season TR 8 Insole

Breathable upper

A tightly-woven mesh makes up the vamp and the heel of the Nike In-Season TR 8. This fabric helps with foot containment.

Nike In-Season TR 8 Upper1

Meanwhile, a different type of mesh is used on the midfoot panel of this training shoe. The material aids in keeping the interior fresh. The inside is lined with a soft textile. The fabric aids in wicking moisture and breathability. Synthetic overlays are used on the midfoot and heel section of the upper. They add style to the top, but they also serve in securing the foot.

Nike In-Season TR 8 Midfoot Upper

Snug lacing system

A traditional lacing system is used on this Nike trainer. It allows wearers to adjust the fit according to their needs.

Nike In-Season TR 8 Lacing System

Heightened support

Flywire cables are incorporated in the two middle sets of eyelets. The strings heighten the midfoot support when the shoestrings are cinched.

Nike In-Season TR 8 Flywire

The Nike In-Season TR 8's rearfoot section

The collar and the tongue are both lined with plush foam. The soft elements protect against abrasion and prevent excessive movement of the foot.

Nike In-Season TR 8 Collar

Facts / Specs

Weight: Women 7oz
Update: Nike In-Season TR 9
Use: Workout / Gym / Cross-training
Width: Normal / Normal, Wide
Release date: Jun 2018
Features: Lightweight

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Author
Nicholas Rizzo
Nicholas Rizzo

Nick combines 10+ years of experience in the health and fitness industry and a background in the sciences in his role as the Fitness Research Director. During his competitive powerlifting years his PRs have him sitting in the top 2% of bench presses (395 lbs), top 3% of squats (485 lbs) and top 6% of deadlifts (515 lbs) for his weight and age. His work has been featured on Bodybuilding.com, LiveStrong, Healthline, WebMD, WashingtonPost, and many more. Along the way, collaborating with industry leaders like Michael Yessis, Mark Rippetoe, Carlo Buzzichelli, Dave Tate, Ray Williams, and Joel Seedman.