Summary

We spent 7.6 hours reading reviews from experts and users. In summary, this is what runners think:

4 reasons to buy

  • Most of those who have tried the Nike Free RN 2018 Wild considered it to be pleasing to the eyes.
  • The underfoot cushioning felt comfortable underfoot, based on several user reviews.
  • A few mentioned that the shoe is durable.
  • The upper of the Free RN 2018 Wild offers breathability, said some comments.

3 reasons not to buy

  • Several people complained that the Nike Free RN 2018 Wild was narrow across the midfoot and heel sections.
  • Some consumers considered the sizing scheme of this shoe to be inconsistent; for them, it was smaller than they anticipated.
  • According to some testers, wearing socks caused the in-shoe experience to be slippery and weighty.

Bottom line

The Nike Free RN 2018 Wild was mildly praised for its contemporary design and comfortable underfoot experience. But most of those who have tried on this neutral shoe were disconcerted with several of its components. The size and width options didn’t have many fans because the measurements were not on par with expectations while the upper unit felt restrictive and uncomfortable.

Facts

Rankings

A top rated Road running shoe
A top rated Nike running shoe
It has never been more popular than this May
  • Built for neutral pronators, the Nike Free RN 2018 Wild offers responsive cushioning in an eye-catching package. Suede covers the forefoot and midfoot sections, giving a premium, animal print-like façade. The heel features spandex for a stretchy and form-fitting fit.
  • A close-to-the-ground foam serves as the primary cushioning unit of this running shoe. Its purpose is to carry the foot responsibly throughout the activity and prevent the impact forces from causing any discomfort during the striking phase of the gait cycle.

This special version of the Nike Free RN 2018  was designed using the standard measurements, though it’s recommended for runners to try out the product first to get the most pleasant in-shoe experience. The available width profile is B – Medium as it is only available for women. The semi-curved shape of the last accommodates the curvature of the human foot.

Ground contact foam serves as the external portion of the Nike Free RN 2018 Wild’s platform. It has nodes and bumps that serve as traction centers for surface control.

The Auxetic design is made of three-pointed crevices that pockmark the midpoint of the outsole’s surface. These gaps are meant to lessen the weight of the platform while also encouraging flexibility.

Deep cuts make the external pad more adherent to the natural flexibility of the foot. These sipes help smoothen the transition from the heel to the toe.

Underfoot cushioning is the responsibility of the full-length foam midsole. It is the one that ensures active steps throughout the running session. It also attenuates the impact forces generated during the landing phase.

An insole with the words ‘Running’ emblazoned on it adds a bit more cushioning for the underside of the foot. It can be removed or replaced.

Going from the midfoot to the forefoot section of the Nike Free RN 2018 Wild’s upper unit is animal-print suede. It offers a premium look that’s not common in running shoes. It’s soft durable.

The back portion makes use of spandex. This stretchable material’s job is to accommodate the shape of the heel and lock it down securely.

A traditional lacing system graces this shoe. Flat shoelaces adjust the fit, giving a customized in-shoe experience to the wearer.

Flywire cables act as security lines in the midfoot. These wires are visibly seen on the instep part, connecting directly to the laces, but they’re embedded between the external and internal fabrics of the façade. They make sure to heighten the tightness or looseness of the coverage.

Author
Jens Jakob Andersen
Jens Jakob Andersen

Jens Jakob is a fan of short distances with a 5K PR at 15:58 minutes. Based on 35 million race results, he's among the fastest 0.2% runners. Jens Jakob previously owned a running store, when he was also a competitive runner. His work is regularly featured in The New York Times, Washington Post, BBC and the likes as well as peer-reviewed journals. Finally, he has been a guest on +30 podcasts on running.

jens@runrepeat.com