Updates to Nike Air Max 2017

  • Nike made several changes in the flagship model of the Air Max series. In the 2017 Nike Air Max, the most visible change is the removal of the Flywire cables. The loop-to-the-laces technology is replaced with a more traditional structure.
  • By removing the Flywire cords, Nike made some changes in the heel and midfoot to provide excellent fit and support. This shoe offers a new molded foam in the said areas. In lieu of the cords, the foam provides adequate hold, support, and a more comfortable feel.
  • Nike sculpted the Cushlon foam in the midsole to provide better flexibility. As the Air Max unit is quite thick, the flexibility of the midsole foam gives it a little more balance and spring.

Outsole

The outsole of this Nike running shoe is basically that of the earlier version. It uses the plastic-like construction with countless small nubs placed all over the underfoot. The nubs of the Waffle design provide the much-needed traction from an outsole of this type. There are also a couple of flex grooves in the forefoot for flexibility.


Midsole

The biggest attraction in the midsole and basically the entire shoe is the full-length Air Max cushioning. It is made of Cushlon foam together with Nike’s innovative gas technology for a more bouncy and shock-absorbing combination. On top of the Air Max cushioning is the standard Cushlon foam for more responsiveness and durability.


Upper

The new Flymesh upper is needed to provide more structure as the 2017 Nike Air Max does away with the reliable Flywire cables. It is very breathable and has the right combination of flexibility and firmness. Besides the molded foam in the heel and midfoot for a foot-hugging support, there is also a partial inner sleeve that wraps the foot like a glove. Nike uses reflective elements in the upper for low-visibility running.

Popularity

The current trend of Nike Air Max 2017.
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Author
Jens Jakob Andersen
Jens Jakob Andersen

Jens Jakob is a fan of short distances with a 5K PR at 15:58 minutes. Based on 35 million race results, he's among the fastest 0.2% runners. Jens Jakob previously owned a running store, when he was also a competitive runner. His work is regularly featured in The New York Times, Washington Post, BBC and the likes as well as peer-reviewed journals. Finally, he has been a guest on +30 podcasts on running.