Verdict from 7.5 hours of research from the internet

7 reasons to buy

  • The seamless construction and a plush inner sleeve take the runner for miles and miles of comfort in the Air Max 2015.
  • One of the best-looking shoes in the market, according to most runners.
  • There is a noticeable smoothness in the transition, based on several reviews.
  • It is significantly lighter than the previous model.
  • A good number mentioned that the midfoot wrap is better than the earlier version of the Air Max.
  • Reflective materials in the logos for low-light running.
  • The 2015 version of the Air Max has gender-specific flex grooves.

3 reasons not to buy

  • Nike’s most expensive shoe.
  • Durability is not enough considering the price range, as mentioned in many comments.
  • Traction could certainly be a lot better noted a handful.

Bottom line

The iconic Air Max line remains to be a yardstick in the 2015 model where great aesthetic appeal and decent performance go. Nike never fails to stretch the boundaries between performance and lifestyle, particularly in this model. While it is undeniably a great-looking shoe, it offers decent cushioning and responsiveness only. The arch support is moderate with a less than average traction. It lacks the performance of a shoe carrying a $200 price tag.

Tip: see the best running shoes.

Expert reviews:

User reviews:

  • Nike focused the changes in the Air Max 2015 in the upper. Making an appearance in this model is the engineered mesh that has a combination of large and small holes in the upper. It is an extremely light mesh that greatly helps with the significant weight reduction. This is a softer mesh and feels plush to the feel for added comfort.
  • The biggest change in the upper is the presence of the Flywire cables. These are clearly seen outside of the upper just around the midfoot. Nike uses the technology to improve midfoot fit as these cables are directly connected to the laces and the midsole.
  • The final update in the upper is the new inner sleeve. This version of the Air Max offers better next to skin feel because of the sleeve. The inner sleeve enhances fit and comfort as well.

The main difference in fit compared to last year’s model is the snugger fit in the midfoot due to the presence of the Flywire cables. Otherwise, runners should still get excellent heel security that is not constrictive and a forefoot that has generally adequate room for the toes to naturally splay. Medium is the only available width while sizing is accurate in this shoe.


The Waffle outsole is almost flat with numerous small square nubs. It is made of translucent rubber. As the underfoot is almost flat, this helps with the stability of a high offset shoe and with the transition from heel to toe. Nike uses deep flex grooves for enhanced forefoot flexibility.


A full-length blown air bag that Nike patently calls as the Air Max is made of very thick air units. It creates a firmer ride and is ably supported by Cushlon foam, Nike’s regular compression-molded EVA. Providing some support and protection against puncture on the air units is a rubber sheet.


The new engineered mesh offers lightweight and breathable coverage. In this model, Nike almost does away with any sort of overlay, except for a seam around the toe box that is fused on. Logos on both sides of the shoe have reflective materials. The heel has more substantial fused on overlay for better support and structure. As always, the tongue and collar are both very well-padded. The aforementioned inner sleeve, also works with a plush insole for plush comfort.

Size and fit

True to size based on 450 user votes
Small (11%)
True to size (85%)
Large (4%)
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Same sizing as Nike Air Max 2017.

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How Air Max 2015 compares

This shoe: 87
All shoes average: 86
53 98
This shoe: $190
All shoes average: $119
$40 $350
This shoe: 13.2oz
All shoes average: 9.5oz
3.5oz 16.2oz
Author
Jens Jakob Andersen
Jens Jakob Andersen

Jens Jakob is a fan of short distances with a 5K PR at 15:58 minutes. Based on 35 million race results, he's among the fastest 0.2% runners. Jens Jakob previously owned a running store, when he was also a competitive runner. His work is regularly featured in The New York Times, Washington Post, BBC and the likes as well as peer-reviewed journals. Finally, he has been a guest on +30 podcasts on running.

jens@runrepeat.com