Nike Air Force 1 React LV8: It’s squishy and it glows up 

Nike's Air Force 1 franchise has validated time and again its popularity among sneaker enthusiasts. At least one of the AF-1 variations tends to snag a spot among the top-selling sneakers across major brands. Adding to its already massive collection is the Nike Air Force React LV8. It’s one of the retro Nike sneakers meant to fire up attention with its striking components and spongy bottom. 

AF-1 React LV8’s bells and whistles and everything in between

  • It’s peppered with black light-sensitive materials that are reactive to flicker.
  • The Swoosh logo is outlined by a glow-in-the-dark detailing, which makes it stick out.
  • It's injected with a comfy React foam cushioning system that softens the impact.
  • For added shock-absorption, this sneaker is infused with Nike Air cushioning.

Nike Air Force 1 React shares the same midsole composition as the Air Force 1 React LV8. If you’re after a more glitzy style, the AF1 React LV8 might be the style for you. But if you prefer minimal colorways, you might consider grabbing the Air Force 1 React instead, which is also cheaper than the other shoe. 

Nike Air Force 1 07 LV8 belongs to the initial breed of elevated AF-1s with an elevated sole. Suppose you feel that the combination of React and Air units are squishy. Or if these are too much for your daily walking requirements, there’s the Air Force 1 07 LV8, that’s less pricey than the React LV8 variation. 

Nike Air Force 1 Travis Scott is worth adding to your Nike sneaker collection if you don’t mind its extremely high value. Travis Scott AF1, which is assembled with an upper consisting of suede, canvas, leather, and corduroy, comes with a price that’s way above the Air Force 1 React LV8. 

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The current trend of Nike Air Force 1 React LV8.
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Author
Danny McLoughlin
Danny McLoughlin

Danny is a sports nut with a particular interest in football and running. He loves to watch sports as much as he loves to play. Danny was lead researcher on RunRepeat and The PFA’s report into Racial Bias in Football Commentary. His football and running research has been featured in The Guardian, BBC, New York Times and Washington Post.