Who should buy the Merrell Moab 2 Ventilator

Merrell’s Moab 2 Ventilator is a perfect hiking shoe for those who:

  • wants a breathable pair ideal for summer hikes
  • wants a versatile piece of hiker designed to deliver comfort on the trails
  • wants sturdy shoes that can withstand challenges in day-long outdoor pursuits

Merrell Moab 2 Ventilator logo

Updates to Merrell Moab 2 Ventilator

The second iteration of the Moab Ventilator features:

  • an upper made of performance-grade suede leather with mesh panels. 
  • one less pair of eyelets
  • thicker overlays on the heel zone
  • Vibram TC5+ rubber outsole
  • the M.Select FIT.ECO+ footbed
  • toe bumper made of synthetic leather

Merrell Moab 2 Ventilator brand and  Vibram

Surface adherent Vibram TC5+ outsole of the Moab 2 Ventilator

The Merrell Moab 2 Ventilator is equipped with the Vibram TC5+ outsole to provide hikers with adequate surface adherence. The rubber compound used in its creation, TC5+, gives it the capability to stick to a variety of outdoor surfaces, be they wet or dry.

Merrell Moab 2 Ventilator Vibram outsole

It is engineered with multi-faceted lugs (with a depth of 5 mm), allowing it to bite into loose- or soft-soiled terrain. The space between these lugs is wide enough to help the outsole channel out water, thus preventing the foot from hydroplaning.

Merrell Moab 2 Ventilator toe lugs

Additional forefoot protection is made possible by having its front end extend all the way up to the tip of the upper’s toe box. 

Merrell Moab 2 Ventilator toe protection

The cupped design of its heel zone, on the other hand, gives the footgear even more structural integrity as well as improved support around the heel region.

Merrell Moab 2 Ventilator cupped heel zone

Stout yet springy midsole of Merrell’s Moab 2 Ventilator

This hiking shoe from Merrell uses a stout yet springy midsole to grant users a steady balance on the trail with as much comfort underfoot as possible.

Merrell Moab 2 Ventilator midsole

A molded nylon shank is embedded within the confines of its medial section, giving its wearers additional arch support and extra protection against sharp terrain hazards. Merrell engineers also furnished it with a company-exclusive air cushion technology at the heel to bolster the shoe’s ability to mitigate shock on every landing.

Merrell Moab 2 Ventilator footbed

Adding to the cushioning offered by the Moab 2 Ventilator’s protective midsole is the M Select FIT.ECO+ footbed. Its inclusion translates into not only bolstered comfort but also improved heel and arch support.

Moab 2 Ventilator’s part suede, part mesh upper

Merrell Moab 2 Ventilator upper

Housing the foot in the Merrell Moab 2 Ventilator is the footgear’s part performance suede leather, part mesh fabric upper. Its overall design lends the shoe a grounded look with a touch of modernity. 

The word “ventilator” in its moniker revolves around the hiker’s breathable mesh liner which wicks away moisture and promotes airflow for a cool and comfy in-shoe feel.

Merrell Moab 2 Ventilator toe cap

The toe area is reinforced with a rubber cap to protect users against knocks and bumps. Its bellows, closed-cell foam tongue prevents unwanted entry of trail debris.

Merrell Moab 2 Ventilator pull tab

 A heel pull tab makes on and off easy while the webbing and metal eyelets permit quicker closure.

Merrell Moab 2 Ventilator lacing system

Facts / Specs

Weight: Men 15.7oz / Women 13.6oz
Use: Day Hiking
Cut: Low cut
Features: Lightweight / Eco-friendly / Breathable / Orthotic friendly / Removable insole
Width: Normal, Wide, X-Wide / Normal, Wide
BRAND Brand: Merrell

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Author
Paul Ronto
Paul Ronto

Over the past 20 years, Paul has climbed, hiked, and ran all over the world. He has summited peaks throughout the Americas, trekked through Africa, and tested his endurance in 24-hour trail races as well as 6 marathons. On average, he runs 30-50 miles a week in the foothills of Northern Colorado. His research is regularly cited in The New York Times, Washington Post, National Geographic, etc. On top of this, Paul is leading the running shoe lab where he cuts shoes apart and analyses every detail of the shoes that you might buy.