Who should buy the Meindl Bellavista MFS

The Meindl Bellavista MFS exudes backpacking greatness minus the bulk. Add it to your to-buy list if:

  • Low-level boulder hopping is part of your pack adventures.
  • You're a fan of Memory Foam and the personalized comfort it provides.
  • Hiking boots that can effectively deal with muddy slopes are what you need.

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Who should not buy it

You might be better off with the La Sportiva Ultra Raptor II Mid GTX if you need something cheaper and without any issues concerning in-shoe slippage. And if a more breathable trekking shoe is what you need, check out the Nucleo High II GTX from La Sportiva

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Fits like a glove

Backpackers agree that the Meindl Bellavista MFS has a perfect fit. "The shoes fit like slippers," one of them says. Another one is super-impressed with its snugness with a little bit of wiggle room around the toes.

Meindl Bellavista MFS fit

Meindl Bellavista MFS equals break-in-free comfort

Through-the-roof and day-one plushness is what the Bellavista MFS has, according to numerous trekkers. The following remarks reflect their admiration for the boot comfort-wise:

  • "Done many mountain walks, without blisters."
  • "My feet didn't hurt." (This is from someone who walked in the boot for 15 km straight.)
  • "You'll never want to take them off again."

There was also another backpacker who went on a trip to Iceland. For 10 days, he walked and hiked in the boot without breaking it in first, yet he emerged with pampered feet!

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Stickiness that lasts

According to reviewers, the Meindl Bellavista MFS is quite tenacious, with one expert saying "the sole offers good grip on wet and dry." Another tester says that it "runs well on any surface," including packed snow and icy terrain.

Meindl Bellavista MFS grip

Try to get it on sale

"You'd better save up for it" is the advice from one of those who are not impressed with the Bellavista MFS' priciness. Another reviewer, however, is more forgiving, saying that the boot is worth it, but its price may not be for everyone, including those on a student-level budget.

Meindl Bellavista MFS pricey

The supportive Bellavista MFS

An expert is so floored by the boot's supportive collar that he said "trips with a sturdy backpack are no problem." Non-professional reviewers, on the other hand, find the Bellavista MFS quite reassuring underfoot, with one saying that it's "very stable and very comfortable with inlays."

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Not a clunky beast

With remarks such as "the weight of 1280 grams is neat" and "nice and light," it is quite obvious that the Meindl Bellavista MFS is a hit in the lightness department. FYI: 1280 g is its pair weight, making the boot only 640 g apiece—quite light indeed compared to the average weight of mountaineering boots, which is 866 g per kick.

Meindl Bellavista MFS light

Wanted: A clingier insole

There are those who find the Bellavista MFS' insole rather slick. One backpacker warns that your feet will easily slide forward on it, causing your toes to get squished against the front end of the boot. The same user even said that "closing the laces around the ankles won't change that."

Meindl Bellavista MFS clingy

Lacing up is a cinch in the Meindl Bellavista MFS

A footgear pundit is delighted by the boot's closure system, stating that its round laces "glide smoothly through the eyelets." A trekker agrees, saying that its metal rings make tying super easy.

Meindl Bellavista MFS lace

Can get stuffy in the summer

It has been reported that the Meindl Bellavista MFS struggles quite a bit in warm conditions. One backpacker likens the shoe to a pair of rubber boots for causing his feet to sweat profusely on one of his summer outings.

Facts / Specs

Weight: Men 22.6oz / Women 20.5oz
Use: Backpacking
Cut: High cut
Features: Lace-to-toe / Orthotic friendly / Removable insole
Waterproofing: Waterproof
Width: Normal
BRAND Brand: Meindl

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Author
Paul Ronto
Paul Ronto

Over the past 20 years, Paul has climbed, hiked, and ran all over the world. He has summited peaks throughout the Americas, trekked through Africa, and tested his endurance in 24-hour trail races as well as 6 marathons. On average, he runs 30-50 miles a week in the foothills of Northern Colorado. His research is regularly cited in The New York Times, Washington Post, National Geographic, etc. On top of this, Paul is leading the running shoe lab where he cuts shoes apart and analyses every detail of the shoes that you might buy.