Who should buy the KEEN NXIS Speed Mid

The existence of the NXIS Speed Mid goes directly against the notion that hiking boots can't be nimble. Buy it if:

  • You're a strider who often negotiates hillsides and slopes.
  • Boots with extraordinary air circulation are what you're after.
  • You've been looking for a pair in which you can walk and stand all day pain-free.

KEEN NXIS Speed Mid buy

Who should NOT buy it

With zero negative reports about its heel pull loop, the Adidas Terrex Trailmaker Mid is a great alternative to the NXIS Speed Mid. Also, you're better off with the chunky-soled The North Face Vectiv Exploris Mid Futurelight if sharp rocks are everywhere on your go-to trail.

KEEN NXIS Speed Mid no

Comfort in excess

The NXIS Speed Mid is praised by many for its sky-high comfort level. Their hot takes are in the following:

  • "Exceptionally comfortable."
  • "These boots are like wearing pillows."
  • "Crazy comfortable."
  • "Gives an ethereal walking experience."

And as a sweet cherry on top, the boot's extreme plushness is available from the get-go, according to several hikers.

KEEN NXIS Speed Mid comf

The KEEN NXIS Speed Mid's mind-blowing lightness

"They feel like running shoes"—this is how an experienced adventurer describes the super light NXIS Speed Mid. One other reviewer was so floored by the boot's lightness that he asked himself this: "how on Earth were they so light?"

From a purely on-paper perspective, the shoe is indeed pretty weightless. Case in point: it's 228 g lighter apiece than the average hiking boot weight, which is 568 g per kick.

KEEN NXIS Speed Mid lighta

Support that keeps you going

With comments such as "comfortable for wearing 9 hours on concrete floor" and "they continue to feel great," the NXIS Speed Mid is among the most supportive out there. For context: the latter remark is from someone who stands 12+ hours all day at work.

KEEN NXIS Speed Mid suppa

Thrives in hot climates

Numerous trail-goers are greatly impressed with the KEEN NXIS Speed Mid's amazing breathability. It "keeps my feet from feeling clammy," says one of them. Another hiking enthusiast has no qualms calling the shoe "perfect for summer hiking."

KEEN NXIS Speed Mid breathe

Pray its heel pull loop lasts

One of the few negative things thrown at this kick is its allegedly weak pull loop at the heel. One adventurer shared that it broke after using the boot less than 10 times.

KEEN NXIS Speed Mid loop

NXIS Speed Mid: Excessively tenacious

Among the featured hiker's many draws is its stellar sticking prowess, and several reviewers agree. "The sole grip is outstanding," says one of them. And as a bonus, the outsole in question feels soft, making fast traversals on flat terrain not awkward at all.

KEEN NXIS Speed Mid grip

Won't give your toes a hard time

Experienced hikers appreciate the boot's spacious forefoot deeply. It's "like wearing slippers," says one of them, comparing the NXIS Speed Mid to a relaxing pair of slip-on kicks.

KEEN NXIS Speed Mid roomy

Keep off rubbly paths

It appears that there's a trade-off with the NXIS Speed Mid's soft and comfy sole unit: it has subpar poke protection. Because of this issue, an outdoorsy individual tells would-be owners to avoid hard, sharp rocks on it.

KEEN NXIS Speed Mid poker

Can make a few heads turn

There are those who are smitten by the NXIS Speed Mid's aesthetics. "Love the look of the shoe," says one of them. "They are cool looking," says another.

KEEN NXIS Speed Mid looks

Facts / Specs

Weight: Men 12oz
Use: Speed Hiking
Cut: Mid cut
Features: Lightweight / Orthotic friendly / Breathable / Removable insole
Width: Normal
BRAND Brand: KEEN
Fit: Wide toe box

Compare popularity Interactive

Compare the popularity of another shoe to KEEN NXIS Speed Mid:
Author
Paul Ronto
Paul Ronto

Over the past 20 years, Paul has climbed, hiked, and ran all over the world. He has summited peaks throughout the Americas, trekked through Africa, and tested his endurance in 24-hour trail races as well as 6 marathons. On average, he runs 30-50 miles a week in the foothills of Northern Colorado. His research is regularly cited in The New York Times, Washington Post, National Geographic, etc. On top of this, Paul is leading the running shoe lab where he cuts shoes apart and analyses every detail of the shoes that you might buy.