What the KEEN Astoria West brings to the table

Versatility is core to the Astoria West’s existence. This means that you can seamlessly transition from wherever in the city to the well-maintained trails in the backcountry. That being said, having this KEEN sandal on translates to a few other things. The following are what we mean:

  • Cat-like grip. The Astoria West’s rubber outsole is siped or engineered with surgical incisions. This type of outsole construction delivers suction-like traction, particularly on wet rock (think mini boulders seen in rivers).
  • Lasting comfort. Its imposing heel and contoured arch work in tandem to give you sufficient cushioning and support throughout your adventures. The sandal also prevents premature leg and underfoot fatigue with its springy shank located around the midsection of the midsole.
  • Ready when you need it. The sandal’s eco-friendly upper dries quickly. It also sheds out water with each step, giving you a moisture-free sandal long before you call it a day.

Alternatives to the Astoria West sandal

Newport

If you are a fan of hiking sandals and KEEN, you should have heard of Newport. This slightly heavier offering is available in both men's and women’s variants. While it is similar to the Astoria West for having a closed-toe construction, the Newport’s rubber bumper is fuller and hardier.

Whisper

Do you need something sleeker and lighter? If so, the women-specific KEEN Whisper is for you. It is also a closed-toe affair like the Astoria West, but its low-profile sole unit makes hikes feel a bit more grounded. And have we mentioned that it comes in tons of different colorways?

Rankings

How KEEN Astoria West ranks compared to all other shoes
Top 36% hiking sandals
All hiking sandals
Top 48% KEEN hiking sandals
All KEEN hiking sandals
Top 17% urban hiking hiking sandals
All urban hiking hiking sandals

Popularity

The current trend of KEEN Astoria West.
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Author
Paul Ronto
Paul Ronto

Over the past 20 years, Paul has climbed, hiked, and ran all over the world. He has summited peaks throughout the Americas, trekked through Africa, and tested his endurance in 24-hour trail races as well as 6 marathons. On average, he runs 30-50 miles a week in the foothills of Northern Colorado. His research is regularly cited in The New York Times, Washington Post, National Geographic, etc. On top of this, Paul is leading the running shoe lab where he cuts shoes apart and analyses every detail of the shoes that you might buy.