Summary

We spent 6.3 hours reading reviews from experts and users. In summary, this is what runners think:

5 reasons to buy

  • The runners who have tested the Inov-8 F-Lite 245have noted that it has a lightweight build that accommodates all-day wear.
  • According to some users, gym workouts can be enjoyed because of the steady platform design that welcomes lateral movements.
  • The knitted upper unit of this Inov-8 running shoe is appreciated because it has a stretchy and form-welcoming structure.
  • Based on a handful of reviews, the outsole is able to deliver responsible traction at all times.
  • Some runners have noted that the forefoot has a broad construction that encourages balance.

2 reasons not to buy

  • A few people have claimed that the in-shoe experience is a bit restrictive.
  • Some runners lament the too-close-to-the-ground midsole, stating that it doesn’t offer a lot of cushioning.

Bottom line

The overall reaction towards the Inov-8 F-Lite 245 has been positive. This versatile running shoe is welcomed because it can apparently handle speed training sessions and gym workouts. Traction and foot balance are traits that can be appreciated from this product, as well.

Fans of neutral running shoes that can handle both running and gym training can enjoy the Inov-8 F-Lite 245.

Facts

Versatile performance on the roads is the name of the game when it comes to the Inov-8 F-Lite 245. This product is configured to offer freedom of motion while also accommodating speed and the foot’s natural capacity to get its own balance. A minimalist design governs this shoe, with a knitted textile upper and close-to-the-ground midsole accentuating the aim for a lightweight and agreeable ride.

The standard sizing scheme was used when the Inov-8 F-Lite 245 was made. Runners can get a pair with their usual choices of size in mind. Still, it is worth mentioning that testing this product personally prior to purchase can potentially enhance the perception of comfort and security throughout its viable usefulness.

The quality of the sideways fit is affected by the semi-curved shape of the platform, as well as the stretchy nature of the knitted textile. The inherent curvature of the human foot serves as the outline of this product’s shape.

The outsole unit of the Inov-8 F-Lite 245 features a rubber compound that is sticky in construction. The purpose of this layer is to protect the midsole foam from the potentially abrasive nature of the surfaces. It also adheres to the ground, offering a grip that is agreeable and consistent.

Meta-Flex is a flex groove near the ball of the foot that is meant to permit the natural bending of the toe joints and tendons. The forefoot lift is the part of the step that benefits the most from this feature as it is the part that involves the flexing of the foot.

The midsole unit of the Inov-8 F-Lite 245 is made of EXTEROFLOW. This material offers high-tier shock absorption in a relatively thin package. The close-to-the-ground nature of this full-length piece encourages proprioception or the perception of natural balance that comes with being able to feel the ground beneath the sole unit of the shoe.

The upper unit of the Inov-8 F-Lite 245 is made of a knitted textile. This stretchy material offers a seamless wrap that is similar to a woven cloth. Its job is to hug the foot and secure it without sacrificing natural movement. Some sections have close-weave patterns to mimic the reinforcing purpose of traditional overlays. Knitted textiles are featured in many running shoe series, including the well-known Pure Boost line.

A traditional lacing system permits the wearer to adjust the tightness or looseness of the fit. Thin, flat shoelaces snake through discreet overlays, and they’re meant to stave off hot spots and chafing when adjusting the fit.

Author
Jens Jakob Andersen
Jens Jakob Andersen

Jens Jakob is a fan of short distances with a 5K PR at 15:58 minutes. Based on 35 million race results, he's among the fastest 0.2% runners. Jens Jakob previously owned a running store, when he was also a competitive runner. His work is regularly featured in The New York Times, Washington Post, BBC and the likes as well as peer-reviewed journals. Finally, he has been a guest on +30 podcasts on running.

jens@runrepeat.com