Summary

We spent 5.7 hours reading reviews from experts and users. In summary, this is what runners think:

7 reasons to buy

  • The lightweight construction of the Adidas Adizero Boston 8 is welcomed by most consumers.
  • ‘Comfortable’ is a word that many have used to describe their time wearing this product.
  • The Boost™ cushioning unit is welcomed as a responsive underfoot piece for all-day activities.
  • A handful of testers have noted that the forefoot section has a roomy construction that accommodates natural toe-splay.
  • Push-off power is appreciated because the midsole apparently balances firmness and flexibility.
  • The upper unit of this running shoe is considered secure and breathable.
  • The traction provided by the outsole unit is welcomed as it is deemed precise and well-balanced.

2 reasons not to buy

  • A few people have stated that the Adidas Adizero Boston 8 has a stiffness that calls for a few break-in periods.
  • A couple of purchasers have reported some discomfort caused by the padding and shape of the heel collar.

Bottom line

The overall reaction towards the Adidas Adizero Boston 8 has been mostly positive. People consider this running shoe an approachable update for their daily activities. The lightweight structure, comfortable build, spacious toe-box, and traction-ready outsole are highlighted as the best parts of the design. On the other hand, the irritating heel part of the upper and the need for a break-in period make up the negative points.

Fans of road running shoes are the market of the Adidas Adizero Boston 8.

Facts

Rankings

A top 2% best Road running shoe
Top 1% most popular running shoes
It has never been more popular than this August

Reviews from around the internet

Expert reviews:

User reviews:

Zappos, REI and 19 other shops don't have user reviews

Video reviews and unboxing

  • The Adidas Adizero Boston 8 is a neutral running shoe that’s designed for those who like to take to the roads. This product features a relatively lightweight build to cater to extended running sessions like fun runs, speed training, and contests.
  • The visual aspect of this Adidas running shoe is what mainly sets it apart from its predecessor, the Adizero Boston Boost 7. While a helping of stitched-on overlays graced the sides of the progenitor, a few synthetic prints that are merely stitch-reinforced are the ones that adorn the Boston 8. Such a configuration, along with a minimalist look, makes it lighter than ever.
  • Continental™ rubber still serves as the external pad. This layer now has a redesigned tread-pattern to heighten flexibility on all areas of the platform. Horizontal traction pads ensure grip on the asphalt.

The standard measurements were used in the making of the Adidas Adizero Boston 8. People are encouraged to get a pair using their usual sizing expectations. When it comes to width, the available options are D – Medium and B – Medium for men and women, respectively.

Consumers are generally advised to try on the shoe first before making a purchase decision to achieve an in-shoe experience that is pleasant and form-accommodating.

This road running shoe has a semi-curved shape which allows the naturally curved outline of the human foot to acclimatize well inside the interior compartment.

The outsole unit of the Adidas Adizero Boston 8 features the Continental™ rubber, a compound that’s used for the tires of vehicles. This layer generously surrounds the base of the midsole, shielding it from the debilitating effects of continued use. Horizontal protrusions are responsible for doling out grip over the surfaces.

Flex grooves adorn the external pad. These shallow trenches are designed to make the platform flexible, thereby enabling the natural bending capacity of the foot as it goes through the gait cycle.

Boost™ serves as the base of the Adidas Adizero Boston 8’s cushioning system. This technology is made up of thermoplastic polyurethane (TPU) pellets that have been amalgamated and made into one cohesive piece. The result is a feature that is ready to absorb impact shock and distribute energy back to the foot, giving a reactive ride that lasts. Boost™ is a licensed technology that graces many of Adidas’ popular models, including the Ultra Boost.

The Energy Rail is a top layer that acts as the platform that supports the foot. This foam piece is meant to maintain the structural integrity of the whole midsole, delivering consistent cushioning for the runner.

The Torsion System is a thermoplastic sheet that is placed between the midsole and outsole. This feature prevents the sagging of the midsole while also helping with the quality of the heel-to-toe transitions.

The upper unit of the Adidas Adizero Boston 8 makes use of a multilayered mesh. This material has a light and stretchy build which accommodates the natural shape and motion of the foot. Breathing holes permit environmental air into the interior chamber, thus giving a cool and dry experience.

Thin prints grace the sides, bolstering the structural integrity of the textiles and heightening the foot-security.

The heel part has a stitched-on fabric counter that is also buttressed by printed overlays. This layer is designed to support the back of the foot, staving off in-shoe quivering or accidental shoe removals.

Some stitch-reinforcements motivate the robustness of the sides and the instep. Even the eyelets of the lacing system are bolstered to avert tearing or loosening of the threading.

A traditional lacing system fills the bridge of the silhouette. Flat laces crisscross through discreet eyelets that run from the throat to the collar. These elements adjust the tightness or looseness of the cover system.

Author
Jens Jakob Andersen
Jens Jakob Andersen

Jens Jakob is a fan of short distances with a 5K PR at 15:58 minutes. Based on 35 million race results, he's among the fastest 0.2% runners. Jens Jakob previously owned a running store, when he was also a competitive runner. His work is regularly featured in The New York Times, Washington Post, BBC and the likes as well as peer-reviewed journals. Finally, he has been a guest on +30 podcasts on running.

jens@runrepeat.com