Summary

We spent 7.6 hours reading reviews from experts and users. In summary, this is what training geeks think:

5 reasons to buy

  • Users agree across the board that the shoe provides a solid and stable base for weightlifting exercises.
  • Its elevated heel helps to improve ankle mobility and achieve deeper squats, according to many wearers.  
  • Some avid weightlifters enjoy the shoe’s flexible forefoot because it helps them get a better ground feedback. 
  • The new textile upper allows the toes to splay more easily in this model, which was lauded by the experts.
  • Multiple buyers admire the new minimalist design of the trainer.

2 reasons not to buy

  • More than a few athletes think that the forefoot flexibility detracts from stability, especially for heavier lifts.
  • One user complained that the eyelets snapped off after several times of use.

Bottom line

Adidas decided to make Adipower 2 a step closer to a versatile CrossFit trainer by using a softer textile upper and a more flexible toe box. While many users enjoy the improved responsiveness, some still find themselves more comfortable wearing a stiffer and more solid shoe like Reebok Legacy Lifter

Facts

Rankings

A popular pick
It has never been more popular than this July

Expert Reviews

91 / 100 based on 3 expert reviews

  • 96 / 100 | As Many Reviews As Possible | | Level 5 expert

    I really like the Adipower 2s. But, as a lot of you guys know, I do CrossFit. So, for me, if you were to give me one pair of weightlifting shoes to use for everything I did, they'd probably be the Adipower 2s.

  • 90 / 100 | BarBend | | Level 5 expert

    All-in-all, the Adidas Adipower 2 is pretty much an entirely new shoe compared the Adidas Adipower. It performed well across the board, but there are a few caveats. There are some positive construction changes for performance when it comes specific populations. For example, this model is much more comfortable and maneuverable, so it could benefit the recreational lifter and functional fitness athlete a bit more compared to the Adidas Adipower. On the other hand, the dedicated weightlifter may not like the overall flexibility and responsiveness of this model.

  • 86 / 100 | BarBend | | Level 5 expert

    If you want the Adipower 2, then expect a shoe that feels very much different to its previous model. This isn’t necessarily a bad thing, but it’s something to keep in mind at all times.

Become an expert

If it weren’t for the name of the shoe, even the most die-hard fans of Adidas lifters would have a hard time recognizing the successor to the legendary Adipower trainer. The brand has rethought the construction of the shoe from the ground up, leaving nothing but the heel height of 20.1 mm.

The new textile upper material is designed to give a more precise, sock-like fit than the previously used synthetic leather.

Traction. The Adipower 2 features a brand new traction pattern. One can say that it looks like barbell knurling, which goes very much in tune with the purpose of the shoe. The tiny diamond-shaped lugs grip the floor when the wearer performs a weightlifting exercise, eliminating the chance of slippage. These lugs are much shallower than what you would find on regular workout shoes. That’s because a flat and firm lifting platform helps athletes push off the floor more effectively.

Elevated heel. Just like any other weightlifting shoe, the Adidas Adipower 2 offers a solid TPU platform with a raised heel. The elevation is meant to help athletes release the pressure off the Achilles tendon as they go down into a squat. It may seem like a small adjustment, but it makes a considerable impact on the athlete’s lifting posture. The trainer retains the 20.1-mm heel height of its predecessor, which is an average height among current lifters. 

Firm wedge. The new design no longer features the visible pillars of the first Adipower but has a more clean and streamlined look. Still made of a solid TPU material, it does not compress even under heavy load. That way, no power gets lost between the athlete and the ground.

Flexible forefoot. Shoe experts have already described this trainer as one of the most flexible lifting shoes ever. The recent trend of making weightlifting shoes as versatile as possible to fulfill the demands of CrossFit has not passed by even such an iconic lifter. A pliable forefoot allows the foot to bend a bit more freely when the wearer walks around the gym. It also gives a chance to incorporate exercises like burpees into one’s training session.

Simple design. In contrast to the robust original shoe, the Adidas Apidower 2 introduces a more minimalist, basic design. Its use of monochromatic colorways also contributes to the clean look. The enlarged three stripes on the side make the branding a bit more apparent but do not overload the shoe. Many users have already noted the similarity between this style and the Adidas Powerlift 4.

Textile material. Based on several recent lifters from Adidas, there has been a trend of using less leather and more textile. The new Adipower also features an all-textile upper in place of the old synthetic leather one. This alteration aims to create a flexible, sock-like fit for a more comfortable in-shoe experience. Breathability is enhanced by six ventilation holes on the toe box and wide pores on the tongue.

Medial strap. A fabric hook-and-loop strap wraps around the midfoot. It runs through a sturdy steel loop and helps to tighten up the fit. The length of the strap has been accurately measured, so it doesn’t drag on the floor even when pulled to the fullest.

The original Adipower was designed and released in time for the Olympic Games in London in 2012. It was worn by the Olympic weightlifting participants.

Author
Nicholas Rizzo
Nicholas Rizzo

Nick is a powerlifter who believes cardio comes in the form of more heavy ass squats. Based on over 1.5 million lifts done at competitions, his PRs place him as an elite level powerlifter. His PRs have him sitting in the top 2% of bench presses (395 lbs), top 3% of squats (485 lbs) and top 6% of deadlifts (515 lbs) for his weight and age. His work has been featured on Forbes, Bodybuilding.com, Elite Daily and the like. Collaborating along the way with industry leaders like Michael Yessis, Mark Rippetoe, Carlo Buzzichelli, Dave Tate, Ray Williams, and Joel Seedman.

nick@runrepeat.com